17 Results

Results per Page
Layout List | Grid | Facets
  • Girl's Dress, 1840-1850

    This is a party or special occasion dress, the light washable fabric probably meant for summer wear. The workmanship is exquisite, the gauging tight and beautiful, the hem stitching fine and nearly invisible. With its drop sleeves, gauging, and wide neckline, the line of the dress is very similar to those worn by older women in the early 1840s. The dress is a gift of a New York State family.

  • Child's Tunic, 1840-1850

    This might be a boy's tunic, to be worn with trousers, although one wonders if the color and fabric were sufficiently masculine (it might also be a girl's tunic, but appears to be too short). This piece might have been used by the Bowen family of Pennsylvania.

  • Girl's Dress with Pantaloons, about 1850

    This dress is notable for its casualness and ease of movement, with the shoulders and sleeves at a natural level. It is also notable for the lower-style dress and the fact that it is made from scraps and can be altered easily. The bodice decoration is reminiscent of 1840's "points."

  • Girl's Dress and Jacket, about 1870

    A nice special occasion dress, worn with a blousewaist. The use of magenta and black together suggests a circa 1870 fabric - a popular aniline dye combination at the time. Also, the zouave-style jacket was popular in 1860s. The red and black silk "shag" trim on the jacket is interesting but is not a great match for rest of the piece. Overall, this girl's outfit has the feel of the bustle and puff style popular in women's dresses of the 1870s.

  • Girl's Dress, 1845-1860

    This lovely, expensive girl's dress would have been worn for very special occasions and appears to have been seldom used.

  • Girl's Dress, 1880-1885

    Straight, low-waisted, heavily knife-pleated girl's silhouette dresses were very common in the early 1880's; men's suit fashions were also often reflected in women's clothing of the period.

  • Child's Dress, 1810-1825

    The puff-over-long sleeve style was seen in women's fashions around 1810-1820. Pastel silks were also used during this period for "best dresses." See: Bradfield, Costume in Detail, pp.107-110; Buck & Cunnington, Children's Costume, p. 195. This dress was probably worn with pantalettes, probably by a little girl, although boys wore similar dresses in this era before the age of about three.

  • Child's Dress, about 1780

    This is the earliest child's dress in the Henry Ford collection. While it seems logical that it would close in back, the sleeves are set in in such a way as to indicate a front closure like other short or long gowns. The fabric may well be British. From the Mitchell family of rural New York State.

  • Girl's Dress, 1915-1920

    This lovely, loose-flowing Arts and Crafts-inspired dress belonged to Alleen Kelly Feiss and is the only truly higher-style Arts and Crafts girl's dress in The Henry Ford's collection.The Arts and Crafts-style decorative embroidery is quite distinctive.

  • Girl's Dress, 1870-1880

    This dress is notable as a homemade attempt at fashion: the colors are typical of the period, but the styling a bit naive. The piecing of the lining material is quite resourceful. The length indicates that it would have been used by a girl.

  • Girl's Dress, about 1870

    This type of dress was very popular for railroad travel after the Civil War, and was probably worn in the summertime. One wonders if it functioned as a duster; however, it appears to be fairly close-fitting.

  • Girl's Dress, about 1840

    The high waist, flat-pleating and wide neck on this dress indicate a very early 1840s date of construction. It is an example of girl's "good" clothing parallel to adult women's styles and not necessarily accommodating a child's body and needs. In particular, the wide neck would have been chilly and difficult to keep straight, and the high waist would have been less comfortable for movement. Similarly, the very thin fabric would not have been practical for a young girl.

  • Girl's Dress, about 1895

    This is an interesting use of cotton chambray and tow cloth. A typically comfortable, casual dress for a girl around the turn of the century. Basting remains visible on the front of the dress.

  • Girl's Dress, 1900-1915

    This is a nice dress for a young girl, perfect for school wear; it has the "pouch" that was popular in the early 20th Century. It is quite worn, well-used and well-washed.

  • Girl's Dress, about 1885

    This is a typical young girl's dress from the early 1880's, when light chambray was a very popular fabic choice for summer wear.

  • Girl's Wrap, about 1895

    This young lady's wrapper comes from the Scull family of Somerset County, Pennsylvania, and was possibly worn by the daughter or granddaughter of Louise Ogle Scull. It appears to be an informal garment, used first thing in the morning. The train in the back is interesting - perhaps it was for a young woman who was rather short. The sleeves, which have some interesting piecing, indicate a circa 1895 date of manufacture. The vermicular printed fabric pattern is reminiscent of circa-1840 roller pri…

  • Girl's Parka, 1992

    This piece was purchased by the curator on the recommendation of fourth-grade African-American students at Woodward Elementary School in Detroit, Michigan - they said that this jacket best represented "hot" styles that kids loved. It was purchased new from Marianne Kids on Woodward Avenue in Detroit.