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  • Men's Striped Wool Trousers, 1919

    Bark green, black and burgundy striped wool trousers, which were owned by John Francis Dodge (October 25, 1864 – January 14, 1920), co-founder of the Dodge Motor Company in Detroit, Michigan.

  • Men's Wool Trousers, 1942

    Gray wool trousers, which were owned by Richard Wilson, the adopted son of Matilda and Alfred Wilson. Matilda was the wife of John Francis Dodge (October 25, 1864 – January 14, 1920), co-founder of the Dodge Motor Car Company in Detroit, Michigan.

  • Men's Wool Flannel Trousers, 1920

    White wool flannel trousers, which were owned by Alfred Gaston Wilson (1883 – 1962), husband of Matilda Rausch Dodge (Wilson). Matilda was the widow of John Francis Dodge (October 25, 1864 – January 14, 1920), co-founder of the Dodge Motor Company.

  • Men's Trousers with Red Stripes Down Side Seams, 1945

    Gray trousers with red stripes down side seams, which were owned by Richard Wilson, the adopted son of Matilda and Alfred Wilson. Matilda was the wife of John Francis Dodge (October 25, 1864 – January 14, 1920), co-founder of the Dodge Motor Car Company in Detroit, Michigan.

  • Men's Striped Wool Trousers, 1919

    Green and navy blue striped wool trousers, which were owned by Alfred Gaston Wilson (1883 – 1962), husband of Matilda Rausch Dodge (Wilson). Matilda was the widow of John Francis Dodge (October 25, 1864 – January 14, 1920), co-founder of the Dodge Motor Company.

  • Men's Trousers with Red Stripes Down Side Seams, 1945

    Gray trousers with red stripes down side seams, which were owned by Richard Wilson, the adopted son of Matilda and Alfred Wilson. Matilda was the wife of John Francis Dodge (October 25, 1864 – January 14, 1920), co-founder of the Dodge Motor Car Company in Detroit, Michigan.

  • Baseball Knickers, about 1930

    Likely worn by Thomas Palmer Bradfield of Orchard Lake, Michigan during the 1930s.No matching jersey or shirt; however, it is clear a shirt would have buttoned to the interior of the waistband. Little usage, although there are a few stains.Thomas Palmer Bradfield was born 1899 in Grand Rapids, MI. He was born in to one of Michigan's oldest mining families.His great grandfather, Charles Henry Palmer, was a pioneer investor and developer of mines and railroads in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. His gr…

  • Duster, about 1915

    The material does not feel as if it is all wool--perhaps wool and cotton or wool and linen. Worn by Willis C. Ward, it is typical in the styling of men's driving dusters. The material, however, is uncommon, as most dusters were generally linen. Willis C. Ward was born in 1861 to one of Michigan's wealthest families of the 19th century. His father David Ward, made his fortune in lumber and acquired and sold timbered land throughout the United States.

  • Mens Suit, about 1880

    This morning suit belonged to Willis C. Ward. He likely used it for a wedding or other special occasion. It is exquisitely made and looks to have been rarely used.Willis C. Ward was born in 1861 to one of Michigan's wealthest families of the 19th century. His father David Ward, made his fortune in lumber and acquired and sold timbered land throughout the United States.

  • Suit of Coat, Vest, and Trousers, about 1920-1940

    According to our records, the suit belonged to Henry Ford.Born in 1863 on a farm in what is now Dearborn, Michigan, Henry Ford parlayed a youthful aptitude for engineering into a career as an automotive innovator and founder/president of Ford Motor Company. Among his ideas were the introduction of the first moving automobile assembly line, affordable pricing, fair wages for employees, and the vertical integration of manufacturing processes from raw materials to the finished product. His many phi…

  • Men's Slippers, about 1858

    Undress or negligee dress was the term given to casual, loose-fitting clothing worn in the morning before changing in to fashionable day dress. Men's embroidered slippers (bright-colored worsted work on canvas) were very popular in the early Victorian period. Ladies magazines often included embroidery patterns for house slippers that a woman mightmake for her husband as a gift. Please note that the term Berlin Work or Berlin Woolwork comes from the fact that the best embroidery patterns came fro…

  • Baseball Uniform Shirt, about 1865-1885

    By the late 1850s, baseball became an increasingly formal sport with urban teams sporting their own uniforms.The predominant style shirt of the late 1850s into the 1870s was a bib front.Typical as well, is an abbreviation of the club name on the bib.The maker of this top applied the letters "A B B C." The letter "A" signifies the club name, and it may reflect a specific town such as Akron or the club name such as "Atlantic."The letters "B B C" represent the term "base ball club," and was also ty…

  • Trousers, about 1820-1850

    Worn by a member of the Mitchell family of New York State.Used on an everyday basis for hard work.

  • Waistcoat, about 1780-1840

    Maybe an under waistcoat, worn under other waistcoast as it is very plain and there is original piecing at side front, indicating the sides would not have been seen.Inserted panel at side seams.Worn by a member of the Mitchell family of New York State.

  • Vest, about 1790

    A rare survival of a winter or fall waistcoat used for hunting or sporting underneath a jacket.It seems likely the bright red color was akin to the orange vest used by hunters today.An expensive piece and few have survived.

  • Breeches, about 1800-1825

  • Trousers, about 1810-1820

  • Frock Coat, about 1770-1780

    Exquisite frock coat from about the time of the American Revolution.Silk imported from England.Styling typical of the 1770s, great curved foreparts and heavy cuffed sleeves.Pink brocade and pink taffeta reminds us of the colorful dress of males in the 18th century. The chain stitching (ca. 1860) and newer fabrics indicate that repairs to the coat are later 19th century. The coat was probably used as theater costume in the 19th and 20th centuries.

  • Waistcoat, about 1830

    A remarkable example of French embroidery executed with dyed and flattened moosehair.The Upper Great Lakes Natives employed moosehair embroidery work on their goods; however, they clearly adopted French styles here for trade to Europeans.Canadian museums contain a few similar examples, but this is rather rare.

  • Waistcoat, about 1805-1815

    Rather dirty, but still handsome early 19th century (Empire) waistcoat, with typical high stand collar and short straight foreparts.Exquisite hand done backstitching.White on white embroidery popular in this era.Tab at center back might possibly be for hangingon a knob or peg.