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: 1835
  • City Hall: History. in 1835, razed in 1872

    Walter P. Reuther Library, Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, Wayne State University

  • City Hall: History. in 1835, razed in 1872

    Walter P. Reuther Library, Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, Wayne State University

  • City Hall: History. in 1835, razed in 1872

    Walter P. Reuther Library, Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, Wayne State University

  • Girl's Muslin Print Dress, about 1840

    Muslin dress printed with red, tan and yellow flower sprig motif. Pieced, lined bodice with round neckline and channels for bones at center front. Lawn-lined bishop sleeves. Gauging at top of shoulder, top of sleeves, and center front. Hammered wire hooks and eyes on sleeves; center-back hook and eye closures. Pleated skirt with many repaired holes. Hand-sewn. This is an early and very fashionable dress with a very high waist - mother's styling in a child's dress, including channels for bones to…

  • Wedding Slippers, about 1830

    An attached mailing label reads: "From B. Shinberg, Gilbert Shoe Co., 151 Essex St., Haverhill, Mass." An included note indicates that that these were wedding slippers worn by a Mrs. Davis of Cambridge, MA around 1830. Shape of heel and toe suggest that the 1830 date is appropriate. White slipper/shoes such as this were typically used at weddings. The very slight wear corroborates this use.

  • Necklace and Earrings, about 1840-1875

    While amethyst is not considered a particularly rare or desirable stone today (it is a quartz and rather soft) it was much prized in the nineteenth century.Until the late nineteenth century, when Brazilian deposits of amethyst were found, amethysts were considered important stones in expensive jewelry.This is an interesting half set, as the necklace has the style and delicacy of the 1840s, but the earrings resemble those popular in the 1870s.Research has revealed that the business stamped on the…

  • Earrings, about 1860

    Between 1840 and 1860 hair jewelry was at the peak of production continuing on with watch chains up until the end of the nineteenth century.Hair jewelry or sentimental jewelry was valued by people not only for the intricate detail of the weave, but also because it included hair of a loved one dead or alive.This particular piece is in fine condition; however, many pieces of hair jewelry, given its delicate nature, do not survive over the course of time.

  • Women's Slippers, 1840-1850

    These shoes are delicate with very thin soles and tight fitting.The idea that woman who could wear such shoes were symbols of high social economy.Men ruled the outdoors, and by the grace of their husbands, women ruled the indoors.Constricting shoes helped to keep woman inside and dependant on their husbands.[Source:Rexford, Nancy E.Women's Shoes in America 1795-1930.Kent, Ohio:Kent State University Press, 2000.]

  • Women's Shoes, about 1840

    Delicate slippers such as these were used by ladies in the early Victorian period with fashionable dress. These tied on to the ankle, much as some ballet shoes do today. These types of shoes were notoriously unhealthy-- they quickly became damp and soiled, provided no foot support, and were occasionally purchased a size or two too small so that thewearer's foot appeared dainty. It was all about looking great; women were not expected to be comfortable or accommodated by their dress.

  • Women's Slippers, about 1840

    These shoes, sometimes called slippers, were used in the Victorian period for wear with a matching dress. Shoes like these were often laced on to the lower leg, sometimes elastic held them on. They wore poorly and quickly became damp and soiled.

  • Baby Booties, about 1930

  • Women's Formal Slippers, about 1840

    The label on the slippers indicates a Paris maker known as Este. Labels from the French maker Este (later Viault-Este) are the single most common type found in shoes surviving from this era. They usually appear in plain black or white satin heelless slippers of about 1835-1865 with a tiny bow at the throat (sometimes obscured by a more elaborate rosette added later). The firm is first listed in Bottin's "Almanach du Commerce" in 1821, under "Bottiers," as "Este, pour Dames, rue de la Paix 13." V…

  • Waistcoat, about 1830

    A remarkable example of French embroidery executed with dyed and flattened moosehair.The Upper Great Lakes Natives employed moosehair embroidery work on their goods; however, they clearly adopted French styles here for trade to Europeans.Canadian museums contain a few similar examples, but this is rather rare.

  • Shaker Dress, 1835-1860

    This dress is believed to have belonged to Elvira Hill, a Shaker. It would have been worn with a tucker, fichu, chemisette, or modesty scarf of some type at the neckline.

  • Girl's Dress, about 1840

    The high waist, flat-pleating and wide neck on this dress indicate a very early 1840s date of construction. It is an example of girl's "good" clothing parallel to adult women's styles and not necessarily accommodating a child's body and needs. In particular, the wide neck would have been chilly and difficult to keep straight, and the high waist would have been less comfortable for movement. Similarly, the very thin fabric would not have been practical for a young girl.

  • The Barbadoes girl: a tale for young people

    Added t.-p., engraved.