• Girl's Dress with Pantaloons, about 1850

    This dress is notable for its casualness and ease of movement, with the shoulders and sleeves at a natural level. It is also notable for the lower-style dress and the fact that it is made from scraps and can be altered easily. The bodice decoration is reminiscent of 1840's "points."

  • Girl's Dress, 1845-1860

    This lovely, expensive girl's dress would have been worn for very special occasions and appears to have been seldom used.

  • Girl's Muslin Print Dress, about 1840

    Muslin dress printed with red, tan and yellow flower sprig motif. Pieced, lined bodice with round neckline and channels for bones at center front. Lawn-lined bishop sleeves. Gauging at top of shoulder, top of sleeves, and center front. Hammered wire hooks and eyes on sleeves; center-back hook and eye closures. Pleated skirt with many repaired holes. Hand-sewn. This is an early and very fashionable dress with a very high waist - mother's styling in a child's dress, including channels for bones to…

  • Round Gown, 1840-1845

    The detachable sleeves on this dress make for a multi-purpose bodice. The back pleating is unusual and is more common in work and plain dresses, but adds ease. The back opening and narrow sleeves are suggestive of the 1840s. This was probably the better dress of a woman who usually wore cotton.

  • Dress and Pelerine, 1840-1845

    Simplicity, rich material, and subdued color indicate that this redingote and pelerine might be of Quaker origin. The narrow sleeves, long waist and darts are typical of the 1840s, while the pelerine is reminiscent of the 1830s.

  • Dress, 1845-1847

    The simple bodice indicates that this dress was worn with a lace bertha and sleeve ruffles. The bust improvers, bodice construction and skirt are typical of the period. The dress was possibly remade from an earlier 1830s silk.

  • Dress, 1845-1850

  • Girl's Dress, about 1840

    The high waist, flat-pleating and wide neck on this dress indicate a very early 1840s date of construction. It is an example of girl's "good" clothing parallel to adult women's styles and not necessarily accommodating a child's body and needs. In particular, the wide neck would have been chilly and difficult to keep straight, and the high waist would have been less comfortable for movement. Similarly, the very thin fabric would not have been practical for a young girl.

  • Girl's Long Sleeve Print Dress, about 1840

    White cotton dress roll-printed with with tiny red flower sprig pattern. Long bishop-style sleeves gauged at top. High waist with gathered skirt. Piped seams throughout. Appears to have been constructed from another garment: bodice pieced idiosyncratically, print oriented in different directions, and wear patterns inconsistent. Old stitches and folds visible on inside, indicating old tuck or fold had been let out in order to reuse fabric. Wire hooks and eyes on sleeves not hammered flat. Hand-se…