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The golden goose and the three bears

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LESLIE BROOKE’S
CHILDREN’S BOOKS
II



THE GOLDEN GOOSE
AND
THE THREE BEARS
With numerous Drawings in
Colour and Black-and-White
by
L. LESLIE BROOKE
LONDON
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO., LTD.
AND NEW YORK


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o’ $3
WAYNE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN


With Drawings by
L.Leslie Brooke.
1ST
“Si


THE GOLDEN GOOSE
T HERE was once a man who had three sons, the
youngest of whom was called the Simpleton. He
was laughed at and despised and neglected on all occasions.
Now it happened one day that the eldest son wanted to
go into the forest, to hew wood, and his Mother gave
him a beautiful cake and a bottle of wine to take
with him, so that he might not suffer from hunger or
diirst. When he came to the wood he met a little old
grey man, who, bidding him good-day, said : “ Give me a
small piece of the cake in your wallet, and let me drink
a mouthful of your wine; I am so hungry and thirsty.”



But the clever son answered: “ If I were to give you my
cake and wine, I should have none for myself, so be off with
you,” and he left the little man standing there, and walked
away. Hardly had he begun to hew down a tree, when his
axe slipped and cut his arm, so that he had to go home at
once and have the wound bound up. This was the work
of the little grey man.


Thereupon the second son went into the wood, and
the Mother gave him, as she had given to the eldest, a
sweet cake and a bottle of wine. The little old man met
him also, and begged for a small slice of cake and a drink
of wine. But the second son spoke out quite plainly.
“ What I give to you I lose myself—be off with you,” and
he left the httle man standing there, and walked on.
Punishment was not long in coming to him, for he had



given but two strokes at a tree when he cut his leg so
badly that he had to be carried home.
Then said the Simpleton: “ Father, let me go into
the forest and hew wood.” But his Father answered
him: “ Your brothers have done themselves much harm,
so as you understand nothing about wood-cutting you
had better not try.” But the Simpleton begged for so long
that at last the Father said : “Well, go if you like ; experience
will soon make you wiser.” To him the Mother gave a
cake, but it was made with water and had been baked in
the ashes, and with it she gave him a bottle of sour beer.
When he came to the wood the little grey man met him
also, and greeted him, and said : “ Give me a slice of your
cake and a drink from your bottle; I am so hungry and
thirsty.” The Simpleton replied : “ I have only a cake that
has been baked in the ashes, and some sour beer, but if that
will satisfy you, let us sit down and eat together.” They
sat themselves down, and as the Simpleton held out his food
it became a rich cake, and the sour beer became good
wine. So they ate and drank together, and when the meal
was finished, the little man said: “ As you have a good
heart and give so willingly a share of your own, I will grant
you good luck. Yonder stands an old tree ; hew it down,
and in the roots you will find something.” Saying this the
old man took his departure, and off went the Simpleton


and. cut down the tree. When it fell, there among its roots
sat a goose, with feathers of pure gold. He lifted her out,
and carried her with him to an inn where he intended to
stay the night.
Now the innkeeper had three daughters, who on seeing
the goose were curious to know what wonderful kind of a bird
it could be, and longed to have one of its golden feathers.
The eldest daughter thought to herself, “ Surely a chance



will come for me to pull out one of those feathers ” ; and so
when the Simpleton had gone out, she caught the goose by
the wing. But there her hand stuck fast! Shortly after
wards the second daughter came, as she too was longing for a
golden feather. She had hardly touched her sister, however,
when she also stuck fast. And lastly came the third
daughter with the same object. At this the. others cried
out, “Keep off, for goodness’ sake, keep off! ” But she,
not understanding why they told her to keep away, thought


to herself, “If they go to the goose, why should not I?”
She sprang forward, but as she touched her sister she
too stuck fast, and pull as she might she could not get
away; and thus they had all to pass the night beside
the goose.
The next morning the Simpleton took the goose under
his arm and went on his way, without troubling himself at
all about the three girls who were hanging to s the bird.
There they went, always running behind him, now to the
right, now to the left, whichever way he chose to go. In


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the middle of the fields they met the parson, and when he
saw the procession he called out, “ Shame on you, you
naughty girls, why do you run after a young fellow in
this way ? Come, leave go! ” With this he caught
the youngest by the hand, and tried to pull her back,
but when he touched her he found he could not get
away, and he too must needs run behind. Then the
sexton came along, and saw the parson following on the


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^ heels of the three girls. This so astonished him that
he called out, “ Hi! Sir Parson, whither away so fast ?
Do you forget that to-day we have a christening ? ” and
ran after him, and caught him by the coat, but he too
remained sticking fast.
As the five now ran on, one behind the other, two
labourers who were returning from the field with their
tools, came along. The parson called out to them and
begged that they would set him and the sexton free. No
sooner had they touched the sexton, than they too had to
hang on, and now there were seven running after the
Simpleton and the goose.
In this way they came to a city where a King reigned
who had an only daughter, who was so serious that no one
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could make her laugh. Therefore he had announced that
whoever should make her laugh should have her for his
wife. When the Simpleton heard this he went with his
goose and his train before the Princess, and when she saw
the seven people all running behind each other, she began
to laugh, and she laughed and laughed till it seemed as
though she could never stop. Thereupon the Simpleton
demanded her for his wife, but the King was not pleased at
the thought of such a son-in-law, and he made all kinds of
objections. He told the Simpleton that he must first bring
him a man who could drink off a whole cellarful of wine.
At once the Simpleton thought of the little grey man, who
would be sure to help him. So off he went into the wood,
and in the place where he had cut down the tree he saw


a man sitting who looked most miserable. The Simpleton
asked him what was the cause of his trouble.
“ I have such a thirst,” the man answered, “ and I
cannot quench it. I cannot bear cold water. I have indeed
<3, ^
emptied a cask of wine, but what is a drop like that to a
thirsty man ? ”
“ In that case I can help you,” said the Simpleton.
“Just come with me and you shall be satisfied.”
He led him to the King’s cellar, and the man at once
sat down in front of the great cask, and drank and drank


ron
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till before a day was over he had drunk the whole cellarful
of wine. Then the Simpleton demanded his bride again,
but the King was angry that a mean fellow everyone called
a Simpleton should win his daughter, and he made new
conditions. Before giving him his daughter to wife he said
that the Simpleton must find a man who would eat a whole
mountain of bread. The Simpleton did not stop long to
consider, but went off straight to the wood. There in the


same place as before sat a man who was buckling a strap
tightly around him, and looking very depressed. He said:
“ I have eaten a whole ovenful of loaves, but what
help is that when a man is as hungry as I am? I feel
quite empty, and I must strap myself together if I am not
to die of hunger.”
The Simpleton was delighted on hearing this, and said :
“ Get up at once and come with me. I will give you
enough to eat to satisfy your hunger.”
He led him to the King, who meanwhile had ordered
all the meal in the Kingdom to be brought together, and
an immense mountain of bread baked from it. The man


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from the wood set to work on it, and in one day the
whole mountain had disappeared.
For the third time the Simpleton demanded his bride,
but yet again the King tried to put him off, and said that
he must bring him a ship that would go both on land and
water.
“ If you are really able to sail such a ship,” said he,
“ you shall at once have my daughter for your wife.”
The Simpleton went into the wood, and there sat the
little old grey man to whom he had given his cake
“ I have drunk for you, and I have eaten for you,”
said, the little man, “ and I will also give you the ship ; all
this I do for you because you were kind to me.”


Then he gave the Simpleton a ship that went both on
land and water, and when the King saw it he knew he
could no longer keep back his daughter. The wedding
was celebrated, and after the King’s death, the Simpleton
inherited the Kingdom, and lived very happily ever after
with his wife.


WITH DRAWINGS BY
L.LESLE BROOKE


THE STORY OF
THE THREE BEARS
O NCE upon a time there were Three Bears, who lived
together in a house of their own, in a wood. One
of diem was a Little, Small, Wee Bear; and one was a
Middle-sized Bear, and the other was a Great, Huge Bear.
They had each a bowl for their porridge; a little bowl for
the Little, Small, Wee Bear; and a middle-sized bowl for
die Middle Bear, and a great bowl for the Great, Huge



Bear. And they each had a chair to sit in; a little chair
for the Little, Small, Wee Bear, and a middle-sized chair
for the Middle Bear, and a great chair for the Great,


Huge Bear. And they had each a bed to sleep in; a
little bed for the Little, Small, Wee Bear; and a middle-
sized bed for the Middle Bear, and a great bed for the
Great, Huge Bear.
One day, after they had made the porridge for their
breakfast, and poured it into their porridge-bowls, they
walked out into the wood while the porridge was cooling,
that they might not burn their mouths by beginning too



soon to eat it. And while they were walking, a little Girl,
called Goldenlocks came to the house. First she looked in
at the window, and then she peeped in at the keyhole;
and seeing nobody in the house, she turned the handle of


the door. The door was not fastened, because the Bears
were good Bears, who did nobody any harm, and never
suspected that anybody would harm them. So Goldenlocks
opened the door, and went in; and well pleased she was
when she saw the porridge on the table. If she had been
a thoughtful httle Girl, she would have waited till the
Bears came home, and then, perhaps, they would have
asked her to breakfast; for they were good Bears—a Httle


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rough or so, as the manner of Bears is, but for all that
very good-natured and hospitable. But the porridge looked
tempting, and she set about helping herself.
So first she tasted the porridge of the Great, Huge
Bear, and that was too hot for her. And then she tasted
the porridge of the Middle Bear, and that was too cold
for her. And then she went to the porridge of the Little,
Small, Wee Bear, and tasted that; and that was neither too
hot nor too cold, but just right, and she hked it so well
that she ate it all up.
Then Goldenlocks sat down in the chair of the Great,
Huge Bear, and that was too hard for her. And then she
sat down in the chair of the Middle Bear, and that was too
soft for her. And then she sat down in the chair of the
Little, Small, Wee Bear, and that was neither too hard nor
too soft, but just right. So she seated herself in it, and
there she sat till the bottom of the chair came out, and
down she came plump upon the ground.
Then Goldenlocks went upstairs into the bedroom
in which the three Bears slept. And first she lay down
upon the bed of the Great, Huge Bear, but that was too
high at the head for her. And next she lay down upon
the bed of the Middle Bear, and that was too high at the
foot for her. And then she lay down upon the bed of the
Little, Small, Wee Bear; and that was neither too high at


the head, nor at the foot, hut just right. So she covered
herself up comfortably, and lay there till she fell fast asleep.
By this time the Three Bears thought their porridge
would be cool enough; so they came home to breakfast.
Now Goldenlocks had left the spoon of the Great, Huge
Bear standing in his porridge.
“ SOMEBODY HAS BEEN AT MY PORRIDGE ! ”
said the Great, Huge Bear, in his great, rough, gruff voice.




r
And when die Middle Bear looked at hers, she saw that
the spoon was standing in it too.
“SOMEBODY HAS BEEN AT MY PORRIDGE ! ” j
j,
said the Middle Bear, in her middle voice. Then the ||
Little, Small, Wee Bear looked at his, and there was the
spoon in the porridge-bowl, but the porridge was all gone.
" SOMEBODY HAS BEEN AT MY PORRIDGE, AND HAS EATEN IT ALL UP ! ”
said the Little, Small, Wee Bear, in his little, small, wee
voice.


Upon this the Three Bears, seeing that someone had
entered their house, and eaten up the Little, Small, Wee
Bear’s breakfast, began to look about them. Now Golden-
locks had not put the hard cushion straight when she rose
from the chair of the Great, Huge Bear.
“ SOMEBODY HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR ! ”
said die Great, Huge Bear, in his great, rough, gruff voice.



And Goldenlocks had crushed down the soft cushion
of the Middle Bear.
“ SOMEBODY HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR I ”
said the Middle Bear, in her middle voice.
And you know what Goldenlocks had done to the
third chair.
“ SOMEBODY HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR, AND HAS SAT THE BOTTOM OUT OF IT!”
said the Little, Small, Wee Bear, in his little, small, wee
voice.


Then the Three Bears thought it necessary that they
should make further search; so they went upstairs into their
bedroom. Now Goldenlocks had pulled the pillow of the
Great, Huge Bear out of its place.
“ SOMEBODY HAS BEEN LYING IN MY BED ! ”
said die Great, Huge Bear, in his great, rough, gruff voice.
And Goldenlocks had pulled the bolster of the Middle
Bear out of its place.



“ SOMEBODY HAS BEEN LYING IN MY BED I ”
said the Middle Bear, in her middle voice.
And when the Little, Small, Wee Bear came to look
at his bed, there was the bolster in its place; and the
pillow in its place upon the bolster; and upon the pillow
was the head of Goldenlocks—which was not in its place,
for she had no business there.
SOMEBODY HAS BEEN LYING IN MY BED—AND HERE SHE IS I"
said the Little, Small, Wee Bear, in his little, small, wee
voice.


Goldenlocks had heard in her sleep die great, rough,
gruff voice of the Great, Huge Bear, and the middle
voice of the Middle Bear, hut it was only as if she had
heard someone speaking in a dream. But when she heard



•the little, small, wee voice of the Little, Small, Wee Bear,
it was so sharp, and so shrill, that it awakened her at
once. Up she started; and when she saw the Three Bears
on one side of the bed she tumbled out at the other, and
ran to the window. Now the window was open, because
the Bears, like good, tidy Bears, as they were, always opened
their bedroom window when they got up in the morning.
Out Goldenlocks jumped, and ran away as fast as she could
run—never looking behind her; and what happened to her
afterwards I cannot tell. But the Three Bears never saw
anything more of her.



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The golden goose and The three bears.
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