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The Detroit Sunday Journal:: July 20-26, 1997

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JULY 20-26, 1997
THE DETROIT
VOL. 2 NO. 36 75 CENTS
SundayTournal
CONTINUING THE STRUGGLE
FOR JUSTICE AND CONTRACTS
©TDSJ
INSIDE
Remembering
the riots
By Christopher M. Singer
Journal Staff Writer
An entire generation has passed since the
/% events that began for Detroit early on
/ % Sunday morning, July 23, 1967 - time
JL enough to gain some perspective on what
was then the costliest urban uprising in U.S. history.
Forty-three people died. An entire neighborhood
was reduced to ashes. The 101st Airborne Division,
just back from combat in Vietnam, occupied Detroit’s
east side; the Michigan National Guard occupied the
west side.
Even as the fires were blazing, President Lyndon
B. Johnson appointed Illinois Gov. Otto Kemer to
head a blue-ribbon presidential commission to inves
tigate the string of more than a hundred uprisings
that began in Harlem and Watts in 1964 and 1965
and culminated in Newark and Detroit in July 1967.
Johnson sent one of his key aides, Cyrus Vance, to
Detroit and Vance ordered Michigan Gov. George
Romney and UAW President Walter Reuther to orga
nize a similar, local blue-ribbon group. It still exists:
New Detroit Inc.
The Kerner Commission reported back to Johnson
in 1968 that the United States was splitting in two,
forming separate and unequal societies, one black
and poor, the other white and upwardly mobile.
Today the Sunday Journal looks back at those vio
lent days in 1967 and the changes they brought to
the metro area. For photos by legendary photogra
pher Tony Spina and personal reminisces of an event
that helped shape what our community is today, see
Pages 4-12.
UAW ends long strike
with big gains at GM
By Martha Hindes
Journal Automotive Writer
In a mass meeting at the
Pontiac Silverdome on Friday,
members of UAW Local 594
claimed a major victory as they
overwhelmingly ratified a strike-
ending contract with General
Motors Corp.
The new contract, approved by
93.5 percent of UAW members,
included major victories for the
union. It brings back to GM’s
Pontiac truck complex more than
550 production and skilled
trades jobs to replace many that
had been lost in the past decade.
It include substantial holiday
pay and financial penalties for
grievances that will cost the
company almost $10 million. It
also eliminates subcontracting
and offers production workers
the chance to move up to higher-
paying skilled trades jobs.
And it sends back to work
more than 6,100 workers who
had been on strike for 84 days,
the longest strike against GM in
two decades.
Local 594 President Ron Miller
said he had no doubt the con
tract would be overwhelmingly
ratified. “We got an enormous
amount of liability in terms of
money,” he said. “We got quite a
bit of manpower. We got almost
all the other stuff we came after.”
In a statement prepared
Wednesday after agreement on
See UAW, Page 16
Ad
journal photo by DAYMON J. HARTLEY
Vince Alonzi, front and center, expresses the feelings of fellow strikers in
UAW Local 594 as they ratify a contract with GM.
CITY & STATE
Oakland Press owner
is buying The Macomb
Daily, a move that
could threaten De
troit’s dailies. Page 3.
SPORTS
Scotty Bowman will
return as Wings
coach, but Ken
Holland will become
the GM. Back page.
INDEX
Entertainment
Page 28
Classifieds
Page 33
Crossword
Page 35
Editorials
Page 26
Susan Watson
Page 4


PAGE 2
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
JULY 20, 1997
ROOFING
★ ROOFING ★ GUTTERS
★ ALUMINUM SIDING & TRIM
★ STORM WINDOWS & DOORS
★ ALUMINUM AWNINGS
★ REPLACEMENT WINDOWS
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"Three Generations of
Dependable Service”
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776-8912
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Detroit, Michigan
SundayTournal
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published weekly by Detroit
Sunday Journal Inc., 450 W.
Fort, 2nd floor Detroit, Ml
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is $15 for three months, $30 for
six months (no refunds). Call
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for more information.
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changes to: The Detroit Sunday
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MICHIGAN
SUMMARY
CASH 5
DAILY 3
DAILY 4
7/18 Midday: 0-9-3
Eve: 8-5-2
j 7/18
Midday: 4-6-2-1
Eve: 1-1-6-4
7/17 Midday: 0-1-5
Eve: 9-0-3
| 7/17
Midday: 2-3-4-8
Eve: 7-0-5-7
716 Midday: 9-0-2
Eve: 9-6-8
\ 7/16
Midday: 5-8-2-7
Eve: 0-2-3-3
7/15 Midday: 9-8-0
Eve: 9-9-1
\ 7/15
Midday: 6-2-0-5
Eve: 2-2-1-2
7/14 Midday: 4-5-8
Eve: 0-0-9
\ 7/14
Midday: 1-4-9-1
Eve: 6-9-8-2
7/12 Midday: 2-8-2
Eve: 0-0-5
7/12
Midday: 1-5-7-4
Eve: 9-4-9-3
MICHIGAN KENO
7/18
1
5
13
14
37
7/18
2
7
11
14
16
24
25
28
31
35
36
7/17
6
7
8
20
31
48
49
52
54
57
60
66
67
69
75
79
7/16
4
6
16
20
39
38
73
40
76
43
77
48
80
7/15
7/14
8
4
21
10
23
26
28
33
36
34
7/17
8
54
19
55
23
58
24
61
28
65
32
67
34
72
LOTTO
7/15
1
4
6
8
10
11
16
27
29
31
32
7/16
18
24
37
41
48
49
40
43
44
48
49
52
54
55
72
73
76
7/12
3
7
10
39
41
42
7/14
1
2
6
10
11
13
18
23
27
35
37
7/18
THE
BIG GAME
50
25
39
42
45
46
47
48
52
53
63
65
71
6
34
35
40
Numbers are not
official
community calendar
Detroit celebrates
birthday No. 296
An ecumenical mass to mark
the 296th anniversary of
Antoine de Mothe Cadillac’s
arrival in Detroit in 1701 will be
celebrated at noon Saturday in
Ste. Anne Church, 1000 Ste.
Anne, two blocks east of the
Ambassador Bridge in south
west Detroit. A reception will fol
low. Ste. Anne is the city’s oldest
parish. Call 313-963-1888.
The King’s Eighth Regiment
will set up an 18th-century
British troop encampment from
11 to 4 Saturday on the lawn of
the Detroit Main Library, 5201
Woodward at Kirby in the
Cultural Center.
Dancers Dream will perform
at 11:20 a.m. outside the
Woodward entrance to the
library. The First Michigan Fife
and Drum Corps is scheduled to
perform at 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m.
The Detroit Historical
Museum, across Kirby from the
Main Library, will offer free
admission Saturday.
Joyful noise
The Joybell and Adult Choirs
of Solomon’s Temple Church,
2341 E. Seven Mile at Goddard
in Detroit, will perform their
annual concert of gospel music,
this year called “Your Grace!,” at
7 p.m. today at the church. Call
313-893-1230 or 313-892-9230.
Lily show
The Michigan Regional Lily
Society annual show continues
from noon to 5 today at Laurel
Park Place, on Six Mile at
Newburgh in Livonia. Call 248-
626-2449.
Children’s film
“Toy Story” will be shown to
children for free at 2:30 p.m.
Saturday in Friends Auditorium
at the Detroit Main Library,
5201 Woodward at Kirby in the
Cultural Center. Free parking is
available all day Saturday in the
employee parking lot on
Putnam. Call 313-833-1490.
UFOs at 50
Astronomer Mike Best will
discuss the first reported sight
ing of a UFO on June 24, 1947,
and will deliver a slide lecture
on the spaceship Voyager’s Mars
landing in a program from 7 to
8:30 p.m. Monday at the Troy
Public Library, 510 W. Big
Beaver at 1-75. Admission is
free. Call 248-524-3538.
More UFOs
Bible scholar Chuck Missler
and Sharon Bordine, recipient of
the Christa McAuliffe
Fellowship, will discuss “Space,
UFOs and the Truth” at 6 p.m.
today at Bethesda Christian
Church, 14000 Metropolitan
Parkway, Sterling Heights.
Admission is free. Call 810-264-
2300.
Surfing lessons
Basic Internet training will be
given from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday
at Baldwin Public Library, 300
W. Merrill, in downtown
Birmingham. Call 248-647-1700.
Americana exhibit
“Crafting Identity,” an exhibi
tion of metalsmithing, wood
working and painting by North
Carolina artist Mary Douglas,
will continue through Sept. 20 at
Wearley Studio Gallery, 1719 W.
14 Mile at Crooks, in Royal Oak.
Hours are 1-8 p.m. Tuesday
through Friday and 11-6 Satur
day and Sunday. Call 248-549-
3016.
Crafts fest
A summer arts and crafts fes
tival is set for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday and noon to 4 p.m.
Sunday, July 27, at Rochester
Hills Museum at Van Hoosen
Farm, 1005 Van Hoosen Road,
Rochester Hills. Tickets are $3
for adults and $2 for students
and senior citizens. Call 248-
656-4663.
Bulk trash
All regular Detroit bulk trash
pickups have been cancelled for
the remainder of July.
Meanwhile, Detroit residents
with storm-related debris can
place it at curbside for pickup on
bulk trash days. DPW workers
will only pick up storm-related
debris from the curb. For more
information on debris removal,
call the DPW assistance center
at 313-935-4700.
International run
A welcoming ceremony for
runners of the Oneness-Home
Peace Run is scheduled for
Monday, July 28, at 4:20 p.m. in
downtown Detroit at the Kern
block.
The international relay is held
in more than 70 nations and
covers 50,000 miles. A group of
12 international runners, now in
Iowa, will enter Michigan at
New Buffalo on Friday and head
to the southern part of the state.
<■ Ceremonies are also setup in
Three Rivers, Kalamazoo,
Marshall, Grass Lake, Ann
Arbor and Rockwood.
The U.S. segment of the Peace
Run is the longest leg and covers
11,000 miles. It began in New
York City on April 19 and will
end there on Aug. 15.
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Suburban papers’ sale
challenges city dailies
Exec’s purchase is
By Alan Forsyth
Journal Staff Writer
The scheduled purchase of The
Macomb Daily and The Daily Tribune
in Royal Oak by the new owner of the
Oakland Press should mean much
stiffer competition for Detroit’s down
town newspapers.
Frank Shepherd, a career newspa
per executive, announced last Wednes
day that his company, 21st Century
Newspapers Acquisition Inc., would
buy the two newspapers from
Independent Newspapers Inc. along
with several weeklies and the
Macomb County Legal News.
This is the second major purchase
by Shepherd’s company in less than a
month. On June 26, the company
announced an agreement to buy the
Oakland Press and a group of week
lies. No purchase prices have been
announced for any of the papers.
Wayne State University journalism
professor Ben Burns, a former senior
executive with The Detroit News, The
Macomb Daily and the Daily Tribune,
said 21st Century Newspapers’ acqui
sitions “will dominate the northern
suburbs. That’s where the big money
is.”
Statements by Shepherd make it
plain that, after two years of the
Detroit newspaper strike-lockout, he
believes the city’s two dailies are less
competitive.
“They will never be a major outstate
factor again,” Shepherd told the trade
journal Editor & Publisher.
The Independent Newspapers deal
apparently came as a surprise to Free
Press executives, who were said to
have discussed it intensely Thursday.
“Shepherd has a serious potential
for giving the News and Free Press a
run for their money in Oakland and
Macomb counties,” said Lou Mleczko,
president of The Newspaper Guild
Local 22. “The potential for his news
papers to grow if he puts out a good
product and aggressively markets
them is enormous. They have only a
fraction of the circulation they could
have in both counties.”
Shepherd’s company is only two
years old and is based in Charlevoix,
where its CEO lives. But it has no list
ed phone number there.
Shepherd, who will become publish
er of The Macomb Daily, said last
week that he heads a group of
investors that are all financial institu
tions, although he wouldn’t identify
them.
Jennifer Bott, a reporter at the
Oakland Press, has written that the
New York investment bank of
Goldman Sachs & Co. backed the pur
chase of the Press. John L. Weinberg,
Goldman Sachs’ senior chairman, is a
director for Knight-Ridder Inc., owner
of the Free Press.
Bill Echlin of the Traverse City
Record-Eagle quoted “industry
experts who asked not to be named”
See PAPERS, Page 13
Journal photos by REBECCA COOK
Chelsea Atkins, 8, makes friends with bunnies in a makeshift petting zoo. Detroit
Summer volunteers Nadia McGill, 17 (kneeling), and Mercedes Brazier, 15, watch.
Detroit Summer volunteer Emma Dannin, 15, gets
help from 5-year-old Tamitria to finish a face painting
project on 6-year-old Joshua Gaines.
B atman landed
on a child’s
cheek and
bunnies cud
dled in a tiny Cass
Corridor park last
week during a chil
dren’s fair sponsored
by Detroit Summer, a
program in which
teenage volunteers
bridge generations
and cultures as they
revitalize Detroit and
learn about the impor
tance of community
involvement. The pro
gram, now in its sixth
year, draws most of its
volunteers from
Detroit high schools.
Jeepers peepers: Frogs gain allies for special status
By Eric Freedman
Journal Lansing Bureau
LANSING - An Ann Arbor law
maker has launched an amphibious
assault on Michigan’s roster of offi
cial things.
The white pine, Petoskey stone
and brook trout already are on the
list. So are robins, painted turtles
and the Isle Royale greenstone - not
to mention white-tailed deer, apple
blossoms and Kalkaska soil.
Now Democratic Rep. Mary
Schroer wants the Legislature to
designate the spring peeper as the
state’s official amphibian.
“Hearing a peeper alerts people in
Michigan to spring as much as seeing
a robin or smelling lilacs,” Schroer
said. “Official recognition of the peep
er is a simple way to celebrate sur
viving another Michigan winter.”
The idea came from Dorothy
Blanchard, a parks commissioner in
Dexter, who collected more than 300
signatures in support of peepers.
The tiny spring peeper - about the
size of a finger tip - is one of three
Michigan frogs that first appear
each March in marshy meadows and
forested wetlands. It sports a dis
tinctive dark X marking on its back.
Male peepers make the distinctive
peeping sounds during mating sea
son.
Meanwhile, an insect could also
win official designation. Rep. Lynne
Martinex, D-Lansing, has proposed
an official bug: the green darner
dragonfly.
That idea came from the Young
Entomologists Society, which points
out that the dragonfly eats
mosquitoes.
If Schroer’s proposal passes, the
spring peeper would be depicted on
the state Transportation
Department road maps and would
join the most recent addition to the
roster of official things.
On June 11, Gov. John Engler
signed a bill designating the white
tailed deer as the official state game
mammal. That idea came from
fourth-graders at Borculo Christian
School in Zeeland.


PAGE 4
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
JULY 20, 1997
Remembering the Riots
Photograph by TONY SPINA / From the Tony Spina Collection in the Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, Wayne State University
This photo by legendary photographer Tony Spina, taken on July 23, became one of the most widely published photos of
the riots. Spina had hitched a ride on a National Guard truck into the heart of the violence. “I then started to walk along the
side of the street with the National Guardsmen,” he once wrote. “They were looking for snipers and rioters throwing bottles and
rocks from second-story windows as we walked by. As a soldier looked up toward the window from which bottles were being
thrown, I took one of my best pictures of the riot. The fear on his face, with the burning buildings in the back, tells it all.”
Before his death in January 1995, Spina left his work to the Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs at Wayne State University.
Heightened expectations triggered rage within
grjj i me tends to alter our memories, to gradually
, / reshape the square-pegged truths that don’t fit
into the gently rounded illusions we like to cre-
ate about ourselves and others.
That’s the way it is with memories of those five days in
July 1967. Flames devoured entire
blocks of houses; sharp bursts of
angry gunfire claimed 39 of the 43
lives lost in that tragic week.
Some look back on that hellish
week and see it as a time of blind,
irrational rage, a time when black
folks and some white folks went
berserk for no good reason. Others -
and I put myself in this later group -
look back and see the rage as being
neither blind nor irrational.
Susan
Watson
Rather it was rage embedded in the
psyche of the community, a seething,
burning rage fueled by the reality
and the legend of social inequity.
When a young congressman named
John Conyers was asked about the
possibility of a conspiracy behind the
riots, Conyers replied, “People have to
get it through their skulls that those
who live in the misery and hopeless
ness of the ghetto are capable of
doing these things for themselves.”
And it was a rage made all the
more intense by heightened expecta
tions of much-needed change that
could result from the civil rights
movement. The Detroit uprising
wasn’t inevitable, but it certainly was
predictable.
In the early 1960s, poor housing,
overcrowded living conditions, dis
crimination, high unemployment or
underemployment and, of course,
poverty helped set the stage for the
rebellion. The unemployment rate of
blacks was more than twice that of
whites. About one out of three Detroit
residents was black, but only one out
of six home owners was black. While
blatant and persistent inequality
does not automatically translate into
rebellion, it sure does pile up a heap
of kindling that can be easily ignited,
whether the year is 1776 or 1967.
And then there was the matter of
the police.
Detroit’s black population was tar
geted by an openly aggressive and
anti-black police department. As late
as the 1950s, the city government
preferred to seek new recruits in the
See WATSON, Page 8


JULY 20, 1997
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 5
Remembering the Riots
Attic was 11-year-old’s window on wild world
Journal photo by REBECCA COOK
The house from where Mike McBride watched the riots, on Pennsylvania just south of
Kercheval, was torn down about five to seven years after the riots.
Michael McBride is a locked-out
Detroit News editorial assistant who
is advertising director for the Sunday
Journal.
ang!
It was the sharp, crisp
crack of a gun that I will
never forget.
A stocky black man lay on the
street clutching a broken bottle of
vodka that he had taken from the
Tiger Cats liquor store around the
corner on Kercheval. The vodka was
quickly emptying onto the asphalt.
Blood began soaking the side of his
shirt and spilling onto the black
pavement beneath his body.
He moaned in agony. Cried for
God. Then half-rolled his body, side-
to-side like a boat in a storm, wailing
for help.
“Oh, God,” I heard him scream as
though pleading on the doorsteps of
heaven for salvation and forgiveness.
“Lord, please help me.”
At the corner, about 100 feet away,
stood a policeman holding a rifle like
a hunter. He was a white man,
flanked by several other white cops,
all of whom where holding pistols or
rifles and staring at the man lying
on the street as if he were a fresh
kill.
The whole world seemed to stop
for a moment that day. Everyone
stared at the black man on the pave
ment. Is he going to die? What did he
do? Why was he shot? Would anyone
else get shot?
It was horribly hot that day.
I was a skinny, 11-year-old white
kid living in a mostly black neigh
borhood. My mother, two sisters,
baby brother and I lived in the attic
apartment of a Victorian firetrap. A
stepfather stayed there occasionally.
A bird’s-eye view
On this day, a Tuesday, I was sit
ting on the floor near a front window,
staring out over the street and
rooftops when I heard the shot. It
was the third straight day I had
watched from inside, and I was
bored. I just wanted it all to end so I
could go out and play ball in the alley
or climb the apple tree down the
street.
I had been trapped indoors, watch
ing the riot from the ovenlike third
floor of this old house. Day and night
on little sleep I would traipse from
one room to the next to get a better
view. It was like channel-surfing with
a remote; each window was a differ
ent television station.
From the kitchen window, I
watched neighbors in the apartment
building no more than 100 feet away
carry on a intense gun battle with a
police helicopter and cops on the
street. From the back bedroom I
could see people cramming looted
goods in every nook and cranny of
their garages.
The front window was the best. I
could sit for hours and watch people
running up and down the street loot
ing all the stores along Kercheval.
The lucky ones stole shopping carts
out of the A&P and ran back and
forth from the store as if they were
playing that TV game show
“Supermarket Sweepstakes.”
It was a cat-and-mouse game
between the neighbors and the police.
The stores would fill up with nonpay
ing customers, and minutes later the
police would roar in like the cavalry
and everyone would run for daylight.
This went on time and again without
incident - until that shot rang out.
The man’s moans had softened. The
police surrounded him, pointing their
guns as if he were about to jump up
in a miraculous recovery and escape.
Instead, his blood continued to form a
large pool next to the puddle of
vodka.
Breezes during that sweltering
week were few and far between. I
remember, though, that what few
there were carried the rich odor of
burning paint and oil from the hard
ware store three blocks away. Or
maybe the smell came from the smol
dering pine-board floors of the dime
store next door. I wasn’t sure and
couldn’t judge from the various
plumes of black smoke dotting the
skyline. I often would pass time try
ing to figure out what was burning
and where.
Good neighbors prevail
So it went during those hot days in
July. At times I was terrified that
someone would set the house on fire
and I would be killed along with my
family. I feared that gunshots could
be fired through the windows at any
moment, yet I was not afraid to sit
there and watch for them.
The night before, a group of people
See McBRIDE, Page 9
Youngster learned that black people can change the world
Larry Davis is a locked-out reporter
from The Detroit News who is work
ing at the Michigan Chronicle.
t started out just like any other
day.
I laughed and argued with
my young friends as we played
marbles and tag, climbed trees,
peeked in windows and jumped off
the garage - just like any other 13-
year-old on summer vacation.
Then reality began to change.
“The riot is coming!” people kept
saying.
We had never seen one. It sounded
like fun.
We ignored our parents’ rules and
ran the four or five blocks to the cor
ner of Grand River and West Grand
Boulevard to wait for it.
A small crowd of people, including
some families, had gathered on the
northwest corner of Grand River
across the street from Cunningham’s
drugstore, Cancellation shoe store, a
furniture store and other shops, to
watch and wait.
We didn’t notice that there were no
police around.
No one seemed to know what to
expect. No one seemed to know what
to do except wait, watch and talk
about what happened on 12th Street.
I heard people talking about the
police, burnings, shootings, honkies,
nigauze and revolution and revolu
tion and nigauze.
Then it happened.
An old, fishtailed, drop-top Cadillac
flew around the corner of West Grand
Boulevard onto Grand River and
came to a screeching halt. Several
black men jumped out. They threw
big rocks through the window of a
store and started loading whatever
they wanted into the car.
The crowd stood and watched,
silent and sure the police would soon
come screeching around the corner to
shoot, beat or arrest the men.
No police came.
Minutes later the men were joined
by other men who smashed more
windows and started grabbing what
ever they fancied. Then women joined
them.
At first I didn’t know what to
think.
Wow! All the things people thought
they couldn’t afford were free for the
taking.
Not one of the four big, burly, white
policemen who had roared up to my
school and jumped out of their big,
black car simultaneously and said,
“We’re watching you, Larry,” were
around.
More and more people were joining
the growing crowd taking things from
the stores.
My buddies and I ran home. We
knew we’d get a whipping if we stole
anything.
But the next day was different.
There hadn’t been any police around
all night or day. People were out get
ting stuff and taking it home, heed
less of other people who said the
police would search homes and put
them in jail.
My mother cautioned all of her
children not to go off the block, but
we weren’t listening. My brother, who
was a year younger than I, disap
peared.
I saw him later walking toward
See DAVIS, Page 10


PAGE 6
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
JULY 20, 1997
Remembering the Riots
Dad, son
share all-night
vigil on porch
Conrad Mallett Jr. is chief justice
of the Michigan Supreme Court. His
father, Conrad Mallett Sr., was chief
assistant to Mayor Jerome Cava-
nagh during the Detroit riots.
M
y father came home
before the riots were
completely exhausted
and had in his posses
sion a huge rifle because the rumor
was that the persons involved in this
activity were in fact coming to burn
the houses down in the Boston-
Edison area (the Malletts lived on
Boston between 12th and 14th
streets). My father came home to
protect his family. I most remember
staying awake on the porch with my
father, waiting for the morning to
come. And he held the rifle on his lap
the whole time.
I don’t remember us talking. I
remember being awake through the
night, which was an extraordinary
thing for a boy of my age (he was
12).
I had gone that Sunday morning to
get my newspapers - I was a Free
Press boy - and all this activity was
going on. I stood there for 25 min
utes watching people break into
stores. ... I did not feel afraid for
myself at all. No one ever threatened
me. At that point the looting was
rather nonthreatening because the
police were not there yet. I was not
witnessing a struggle; I was just
watching people break into stores.
I decided that delivering papers
was a useless exercise. I went home
and woke up my father and said,
“Daddy, I think the riot has started.”
I was aware enough of my father’s
hope - he was the single most impor
tant black professional on Cava-
nagh’s staff - that we would miss
the riot, that Jerry Cavanagh’s lead
ership would build a bridge to allow
us to avoid the conflagration. We
were hopeful and our hopes were not
realized.
Then he called the mayor as I was
standing in the bedroom, and he
said, “Mr. Mayor, my son has just
come back from 12th Street. Mr.
Mayor, I think the riot has started.”
My father went downtown and we
didn’t see him for three or four days.
I remember on that night (when
his father returned) across the street
from us lived J.B. Thompson, owner
of the funeral home, (and) Mr.
Thompson was sitting on his porch
with his son Eddie. It was very
strange. That night was very
strange.
Young mayor’s heart was broken
Mark Cavanagh is a Michigan
Appeals Court judge who lives in
Royal Oak.
By Paige St. John
Journal Staff Writer
* hile armed National
V j Guardsmen camped on
' , ' \§ 13-year-old Mark
Cavanagh’s front bal
cony, his father, Mayor Jerome
Cavanagh, wrestled with a commu
nity’s rage that swallowed up more
of the city each day in smashed win
dows, demolished buildings and
dead bodies.
“I was surprised by the extent,”
Mark Cavanagh said last week,
“how it kept getting larger and larg
er and larger, how it was first just
here and then, wow, it was over
there. ... Everything done to stop it
just wasn’t enough.”
The riots, an explosion of anger
and violence that shook the city for
five days in July 1967, left 43 people
dead. It changed forever the city of
Detroit, and it broke the political
will of a mayor who thought he
could change anything.
Jerome P. Cavanagh had told
America he could weave a net of
social programs that would not just
catch but uplift the urban poor. The
Kennedy administration financed it.
America believed it. Cavanagh’s
strong Irish face shone on the inside
pages of Newsweek and on the
cover of Look magazine.
That summer race-related riots
flared up in other cities. But in
Detroit, Mark Cavanagh says, “Dad
believed there were good guarantors
that there would be no problems.
There was a small incident on
Kercheval he was able to stem
immediately. They were quite confi
dent. They saw this as evidence of
the fact that things were working
well in Detroit.”
And so it happened that on
Saturday, July 22, the mayor took
his son on their weekly drive
through town. The youngster asked
his father to take him down 12th
Street in the heart of Detroit’s black
community. He remembers the bus
tle on the sidewalks that humid
night. Then they drove on, stopped
for ice cream and returned to the
Manoogian Mansion where the
young Cavanagh stayed up late to
watch a horror show and finally fell
asleep.
Early the next morning, a police
raid on an after-hours night spot on
12th Street set off the spark that
ignited into a full-scale riot. Mark
woke to find his father had gone
downtown, calling for the help of
the National Guard and federal
troops. Gov. George Romney
responded, but President Lyndon B.
hfffjiBii
mmm&r
■ ■ ■
Mark
Cavanagh,
above and left
with his father,
Mayor Jerome
Cavanagh,
says the riots
broke his
father’s heart.
“You could
just feel the
pain.”
Johnson did not act immediately. It
was three days before federal troops
arrived and took charge of Detroit’s
east side. The worst of the rioting
was on the west side.
To this day, the younger Cava
nagh believes that Johnson, a
Democrat, used the riots to puncture
Romney’s hopes for the Republican
presidential nomination. A year
later neither man was in the run
ning. For their political games, Mark
Cavanagh says, “Detroit still suffers.
“I’m one that wishes Detroit had
the vibrance, the solidarity, the
unity, the commercial activity it did
as I was growing up,” he said. “I
miss the city. (The riots) led to the
carving out of the heart of Detroit.”
And they broke the heart of his
father.
“Dad was very much of a stoic,”
Cavanagh says. “He was very tight-
lipped - that indomitable Irish spirit
that he got from his grandfather.
He did not speak a lot about the
letdowns in his life. But I can
remember the somberness of every
thing (after the riots). The atmo
sphere. You could just feel the pain.
“Detroit was his mistress.”
Jerome Cavanagh did not seek a
third term as mayor. His political
career was all but over. He taught
at the University of Michigan and
practiced law. In 1974 he ran for
governor but lost in the primaries
to Sander Levin. In 1976 he started
a run for the U.S. Senate but
dropped out early in the race when
he was diagnosed with kidney can
cer. Six weeks after surgery to
remove the kidney, Cavanagh tried
to re-enter the race but decided it
was too late to mount a successful
campaign.
He died of a heart attack in 1979
at the age of 51.
Journal photo by GEORGE WALDMAN


JULY 20, 1997
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 7
for miles
Allan Lengel is a locked-out reporter
from The Detroit News who now
works at the Washington Post.
" v iT unior high. Summer vacation.
Early Sunday morning, July
23, 1967,1 ventured with my
father down the Lodge
Freeway, off to his bar on Grand River
in Detroit’s inner city, to help clean
up. Little did I know that several
hours later Detroit would never be
the same.
I loved going to the bar. I drank
soda, ate chips and beer nuts, and
played the jukebox - Sam and Dave,
the Temptations, Otis Redding, the
Supremes. I often ended up stacking
empty beer bottles and putting up all
the chairs so I could mop and wax
when the janitor, who taught me how
to play pool, was AWOL because of
excess libations the night before.
We arrived that morning around 8,
after breakfast at Green’s
Hamburgers at Seven and Greenfield.
The bar was close to the 20 Grand,
Detroit’s premier nightclub that
booked some of Motown’s giants.
Some nights the overflow crowd came
to my father’s place, the Strand
Lounge.
At noon, my father opened for busi
ness. Shortly afterward we went next
door, as we always did, for a shoe
shine at a place that doubled as a
blind pig. Everyone there was talking
about a bust at another blind pig at
12th and Clairmount in the wee
morning hours. About 80 people had
been arrested and some denizens of
the neighborhood threw objects at
police. Violence spread. Police cor
doned off part of 12th Street, not far
from where we were.
I had had a hunch this was coming.
Several weeks earlier, on the last day
of school, I was kidding around with
Ruth English, an African-American
classmate. The conversation turned
serious, and she warned in no uncer
tain terms that big trouble was
ahead in the summer.
Ruth’s prognosis came true. The
Motor City was burning - but not my
father’s place. It was seriously van
dalized and looted but spared the
torch. Most other businesses on the
block were not so fortunate.
Back home in Oak Park, neighbors
looked perplexed. Some had business
es in the city. One next-door neighbor
owned two clothing stores; the other
had a cleaners. A person down the
street owned a pharmacy. We all
stood on our lawns as the afternoon
languished, looking southward at the
angry black smoke billowing in the
distance. Five days later it was over.
Forty-three people were dead, and
Detroit had the look of 1945 Berlin.
The neighbor with the clothing
stores eventually moved his business
to the suburbs. The big fella nick
named Tex, who owned the cleaners
near the old Olympia, was murdered
about four years after the riots.
Someone walked into his shop, pulled
out a sawed-off shotgun and blew
him away.
My father sold his place a year
after the riots; most of the stores sur
rounding it had burned to the ground.
He returned to his old job at General
Motors as a tool and die maker, a
trade he had learned in Poland before
World War II. About four years after
the sale, the new owner stopped mak
ing payments and closed. Later the
bar was briefly converted to a private
motorcycle club.
The new owner now uses the run
down building to store car parts. He
repairs cars on the vacant lot next
door. Occasionally I stop by and talk to
him. Last time I was there, last sum
mer, he told me he tried fixing up the
place; he was planning to start a pri
vate club. But he heated it with a
kerosene lamp and part of the inside
caught fire. He said he was thinking of
redoing it, and if I happened to hear
music, by all means I should drop by.
‘We wondered... what we’d see when we returned’
Remembering the Riots
Angry black
smoke seen
As fire
fighters in the
background
grapple with
a blaze,
soliders patrol
Detroit streets
in a U.S.
Army tank.
Photograph by TONY SPINA / From the Tony Spina Collection in the Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, Wayne State University
W. Kim Heron was a copy editor at
the Detroit Free Press before the
strike. He now is managing editor of
the Metro Times.
- ddly, it seems I should
remember more.
My family had moved to
Detroit three years earlier
from Amherstburg, Ontario, and on
the day of the riot my mother, two
brothers and I had driven back
“home,” as we still thought of
Amherstburg, to visit my grandpar
ents and celebrate my 14th birthday.
Somehow we heard about the grow
ing destruction that we had left
across the border and the reports
that the border had been sealed.
(Don’t ask me whether the reports
were accurate; they were on the radio
and we accepted them.)
We lived near Seven and Schaefer,
one of the relatively few black fami
lies in the neighborhood at that time,
and though we could figure from the
reports that the destruction wasn’t
out that far, we wondered, nonethe
less, far into the night what we’d see
when we returned.
I can’t recall seeing smoke from the
Lodge after we drove to the tunnel
and crossed the river the next day,
but I do remember seeing lines of
green military trucks parked on the
shoulders - that and the eerie empti
ness of the freeway as we drove home.
In the aftermath, I remember hear
ing H. Rap Brown’s riveting line,
“Burn, baby, burn,” on the radio, read
ing articles in The Detroit News, look
ing for commies behind the ruckus
and watching the “For Sale” signs
sprouting around us faster than ever.
Kim Heron, left, around age 14, with brothers Keith and Chris. They lived at Seven and
Schaefer.


PAGE 8
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
JULY 20, 1997
Remembering the Riots
Into the eye of the firestorm
A truckload of National Guardsmen and police deploys on July 23, 1967.
Bill Halls is a locked-out sports-
writer from the Detroit News who now
covers sports for the Sunday Journal.
e could see the smoke
from the fires along 12th
* Street rising over the left-
field foul pole at Tiger
Stadium on that Sunday afternoon in
July 1967.1 was covering a double-
header for the Associated Press, and
most people watching from the press
box speculated it must be a huge fire.
By the time I finished up and got
home, the office had called and I was
told to go back to work. It seemed a
raid on a blind pig on 12th at
Clairmount had gone awry in the wee
hours of Sunday morning.
Detroit was in the middle of a heat
wave, and nighttime temperatures
were still in the 90s. Crowds of people
had fled their hot apartments and
were in the streets.
The mob began to toss bricks and
other debris at an undermanned
group of police who discovered that
the after-hours bar was loaded with
more people than they had anticipat
ed. Soon stores were being looted and
set afire.
By Sunday afternoon an incident
had become a full-blown riot. It was
all police could do to try to contain
rioters frustrated by a feeling that
things would never get any better in
the ghetto.
As the riot spread to other sections
of the city, AP was dispatched to cover
the story. Michigan Gov. George
Romney sent the Michigan National
Guard from its summer camp in
Grayling to Detroit to help local and
Michigan State Police.
Trying to protect their property,
black store owners wrote “soul broth
er” on the windows. In one instance a
poor speller wrote “sol broder,” but
there was little time for humor. The
fires spread to residential areas and
people were being burned out of their
homes. A number of people were shot
and killed.
WATSON, From Page 4
Deep South states of Georgia,
Mississippi and Alabama rather than
hire blacks in Detroit for the vacant
jobs. By the mid-1960s, blacks repre
sented 30 percent of the population,
but only 5 percent (214 out of 4,356)
of the sworn police officers.
Detroit police did not start the riot,
but their actions before and immedi
ately after did little to prevent it or to
erase its scars.
In 1943, urban riots claimed 34
lives in Detroit. The general in
One of our AP reporters, who spoke
with an accent and had a difficult-to-
pronounce eastern European name,
was arrested and tossed in the 10th
(Livernois) precinct lockup. When we
finally located him and paid bail, a
desk sergeant still believed “he’s a
communist agitator.”
I recall accompanying a female
reporter in her quest to find out what
happened to people burned out of
their homes on the near west side.
We finally found them in the base
ment of St. Mary of Redford Catholic
Church where a priest had offered
food and lodging.
charge of the federal troops here then
complained of terrible police excesses
against black citizens. In the late
’50 s, an upset mayoral victory for
Jerome Cavanagh was sparked by
Louis Miriani’s so-called crackdown
on crime and its orgy of arrests of
black citizens simply because they
seemed “suspicious.” And about four
years after the ’67 rebellion, a contro
versial police decoy unit known as
STRESS (Stop Street Robberies,
Enjoy Safe Streets) ran rampant
through portions of the black commu
nity, killing 22 people, all but one of
On another occasion my anger got
the best of me and I ripped out a TV
cameraman’s plug. I was asking ques
tions at Detroit Mayor Jerome R
Cavanagh’s press conference and he
was filming me and retrieving the
answers. It didn’t help that he banged
me in the head with his camera.
People were genuinely frightened.
In the suburbs, police set up road
blocks and stopped every car leaving
Detroit. In Washington, D.C., Presi
dent Lyndon B. Johnson dispatched
special aide Cyrus Vance to assess the
situation. He told reporters, “I can see
the light at the end of the tunnel.”
them black.
To be sure, those five days in July
1967 had more than their share of
looters and arsonists; of black folks
who set fire to their own neighbor
hoods; of opportunists out for a quick
hit; of fools caught up in the excite
ment.
But those days also had more than
their fair share of square-pegged
truths, some as old as this nation. As
long as we deny them or try to ignore
them, they will continue to anchor us
in misunderstanding, mistrust and
divisiveness.
Then the president sent in the pro
fessionals - the 101st Airborne divi
sion - and things immediately quiet
ed down.
The AP had rented hotel rooms in
the old Pick Fort Shelby (now aban
doned except for a street-level bar) so
reporters could catch a few hours’
sleep or obtain a room-service sand
wich. I recall sitting in a room one
night with a fellow reporter, Jim
Nichols, and noticing total silence for
the first time. The riot was over.
In its aftermath was a massive cul
tural change in the city. Many whites
fled to live in the suburbs and, to this
very day, many have never returned,
even for a visit. Civic groups such as
Focus: HOPE and New Detroit Inc.
were formed to help revive the city.
Twelfth Street was renamed Rosa
Parks Boulevard.
It’s debatable whether there has
been much improvement, but general
attitudes are upbeat 30 years later.
When it was over, I can recall mas
sive fatigue. I’d worked 160 hours in
a week (with union overtime). Wes
Gallagher, then the general manager
of AP, wrote a nice note to the wives
of reporters, apologizing for keeping
their husbands away and sent each a
pearl pin.
The gesture was appreciated. My
wife, Margaret, still wears the pin.
Expectations triggered the rage within
Photograph by TONY SPINA / From the Tony Spina Collection in the Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, Wayne State University


JULY 20, 1997
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 9
-j
Remembering the Riots
Photograph by TONY SPINA / From the Tony Spina Collection in the Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, Wayne State University
Residents gathered at the comer of Linwood and Hazelwood greet a National Guard patrol with different reactions.
Attic was window on world
McBRIDE, From Page 5
from another block had tried to break
in. They wanted to burn the house
down because white people lived
there, I could hear them say.
“No, you ain’t,” our neighbors said.
“Those are good white people there
and you can take your ass on back to
your street.” A crowd gathered and a
struggle ensued. Soon the group from
the other block left.
We didn’t step out of the house
until that Friday. The black woman
next door asked my mother if every
thing was OK. She wanted to know if
we needed anything. She had just
cooked a bunch of greens and corn
bread and we were welcome to it.
Even though I had my freedom
back, I still sat staring at the scene
on the street.
I did not understand why a man
could be killed over a bottle of vodka.
A bunch of places had been set on
fire and no one was killed over that.
People firing guns at the police
weren’t killed. Others who pulled
cars up to stores and filled them to
the breaking point, they weren’t
killed.
This man was shot, I figured,
because he was old and slow. If he
could have run as fast as I could, he
would have gotten away. Everybody
else did.
Blood and fear
The cops looked over the man on
the street and forced the broken bot
tle out of his clutch. They called for
more police and a car to take the vic
tim away. As they prepared to drag
him off the street, an officer with a
rifle looked up at the window and
saw me. He stared at me for the
briefest moment and then raised the
gun barrel on a line with my eyes.
“You,” he yelled for the whole block
to hear. ‘You in that window. Get
away before you end up like him. Get
away now!”
He moved his head closer to the
rifle to line up his shot. I dropped to
the floor with my heart beating. I
gasped for a breath and began to
sweat. He was going to shoot me, I
said to myself. I’m just a kid. Why
would he want to shot me?
I lay there on the floor. All my
thoughts were of being shot. Of being
killed. Of missing my mother, my sis
ters and brother. Of not being able to
play ball again.
My innocence was shattered that
day. I realized how fragile and pre
cious life is.
About a half hour passed before I
slipped up to another window with a
view of the street. I peeked over the
ledge and down to the spot where the
man had lain. He was gone. So were
the cops.
A group of people had ventured to
that spot. They were talking and
shaking their heads. I could not hear
what they were saying but I could
tell they too did not understand why
he was shot.
The blood on the road had turned
dark red. A finger of it began moving
toward the vodka.
As the day wore on, more people
came out of their houses. The cat-
and-mouse game resumed. I went
over to the kitchen window to see
what was happening at the apart
ment building and then to the back
to see if anything was happening in
the alley. It was some time before I
looked out that front window again.
I never found out who that man
was or if he died.
I did find a little more maturity,
understanding and respect for life
that day.


PAGE 10
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
JULY 20, 1997
Remembering the Riots
‘How do you go beyond rebellion?’
Grace Lee Boggs is a lifelong
Detroit activist. At 82 she is in her
sixth year with the Detroit Summer
youth project. Born in Providence,
R.I., she grew up in New York City,
graduated from Barnard College,
then earned a doctorate in philosophy
from Bryn Mawr College. It was her
commitment to activism that brought
her to Detroit to work at a left-wing
newspaper. That’s where she met her
husband, James Boggs, a Chrysler
East Jefferson Plant worker. Together
they were authors, scholars, histori
ans, rebels and lovers. He died in July
1993. Her autobiography, “Living for
Change,” is due to be published by the
University of Minnesota Press.
Journal staff writer Christopher M.
Singer recently asked Boggs about the
1967 Detroit riots.
hy do you say “riot”?
Why not “rebellion”?
I think it’s really, real
ly important to make the
distinction. There’s layers of truth,
you know.
This was obviously different from
1943. That was a riot. This, the roots
grew much deeper.
Jimmy wrote in “Revolution and
Evolution in the Twentieth Century”
in 1974 that a rebellion is a sponta
neous attack on authority.
Revolution is different. We have to
find out what’s different. How do you
go beyond rebellion? How do you
make revolution?
There was a terrific consciousness
that what was happening in the
South was different than what was
happening here. Here it was a ques
tion of power.
Jimmy wrote an article (published
in Monthly Review), “The City Is a
Black Man’s Land” (in which he theo
rized the police were an occupation
army).
... The pivotal case was the
Cynthia Scott case (a black woman
shot and killed by white police in
1963). We organized picketing of
police headquarters. Thousands of
That’s why we organized the
Freedom Now Party in 1964 and ran
candidates for office.
The persistence in calling it a “riot”
is an evasion of “what do you do
about it?” If I make you uneasy about
using the word “riot,” good. We need
to see it as a question, not an answer.
The city today is really the black
man’s land. The new issue we face is:
How do we build our cities? As my
husband used to say, how do we civi
lize the cities, re-spirit the cities?
I think the rage during the ’60s
was because black people knew what
they wanted. It’s hard to have rage if
you don’t know what you want.
The general phrase “rising expecta
tions” describes the whole postwar
period. Already in the 1950s, there
was a crisis in the new employment.
There was a general illusion that
industry was going to continue to
expand.
But the jobs that you could drop
out of school in the ninth grade and
go to work in the plant making
enough money to get married and
raise a family weren’t there. Jimmy
talked about the troops of young men
on the streets, this group of “out
siders” that was being created and
are still there.
It’s going to require an enormous
amount of rethinking on what is the
purpose of “work” as opposed to
“jobs.” In 1992 we were picketing
crack houses and we found we had
older people and small children, but
few youths. So we issued a call for
youth and we called it Detroit
Summer.
We’re in our sixth season now. We
want young people to be the “van
guard,” to build a movement.
The major challenge that we face -
and will face for a number of years -
is: How do you build community? I
know we have to build community,
but I don’t know what shape it’s
going to take.
The most important thing we can
do today is to engage people to create
another vision.
Journal photo by DAYMON J. HARTLEY
Lifelong activist Grace Boggs: “I know we have to build community, but I don't know
what shape it’s going to take.”
people were circling the building and
there was so much energy. The police
were looking out the windows and it
looked like the police were scared to
death.
We decided to organize a caravan
to Edmund Place (where Scott was
killed) to get the crowd out of there.
And some people said we shouldn’t
have defused it. We should have let it
happen. Now I think they were right.
Without the rebellion, it would
have taken decades to reach black
political power. We were trying to find
political ways to address the issues.
We needed black political power.
‘Black people could change the world’
HAVIS, From Page 5
home with a grocery cart full of gro
ceries.
I went back up to the shopping cen
ter and headed straight for the store
that had comic books. The place was
a wreck. I had to pick my treasure up
off the floor.
Later I went back and saw pink
faced, green-garbed, rifle-toting Army
men standing all around the stores
on Grand River and West Grand
Boulevard. They didn’t stop any of
the people who rummaged through
the devastated storefronts.
They seemed to be looking for
someone - probably those rooftop
snipers everyone talked about.
No one I knew had ever seen a gun
that wasn’t on the hip of a policeman.
I didn’t realize it at the time, but
my view of the world had changed.
What I later would learn to call the
White Man, the Man, Mr. Charlie, the
Great White Father, the
Establishment, the Powers That Be
or Management was no longer invin
cible.
Though my mother would have to
ride an hour each way on the -bus to
buy us food a couple of weeks later,
though many of the store owners at
Grand River and West Grand
Boulevard would eventually move
out, we, the people, had used a little
of the moralistically wrong power
others had used to keep us desperate.
And a lot of us were alive and free
to talk about it.
All bets were off. Anything could
happen.
I began to realize the awesome
power black people wield.
As I grew up, I came to know that
power is a juggernaut of pent-up
hopes and desires that saves some
infants from fires but shakes others
to death, tortures some women and
stops bullets for others and treats
some men like kings but cuts the
genitals off others.
My parents and my comic books
taught me to believe that power
should be used for good. To build, not
destroy.
I began to believe black people
could change the world.


JULY 20, 1997
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 11
Remembering the Riots
Martha Reeves.
‘Dancing’ was calming
„> center, wanted to
promote peace
through music.

'II'.
Former Motown star Martha Reeves
well remembers July 23, 1967. She
was scheduled to perform that night at
the Fox Theatre. She shared these
memories with Journal music writer
Susan Whitall.
Was your music played during
the unrest in Detroit to calm peo
ple?
It was a beautiful feeling when we
were full of hate and anger and every
body was so full of unrest, that we
saw people actually join together, get
out of their cars and dance to a song
(“Dancing in the Street”) that meant
we should rejoice. I can recall it quite
vividly, seeing people open up their
college campuses and let us dance on
their football fields. ... The Motown
sound was a very big influence in the
civil rights movement. It was not that
we marched or paraded, we just pro
moted it through love. It’s easy mak
ing love.
Weren’t you singing at the Fox
the night the riots broke out?
We were at the Fox Theatre and
“Jimmy Mack” had just been released,
and I was anxious to sing it because I
thought it was the best song I’d ever
done. But they told us that we had to
tell everybody to go home, that there
was a police curfew ... and there were
sirens and guns going off. We man
aged to get home ... then I had to get
on an airplane, while the city burned,
to go to South Carolina. Rap Brown
was in town and they barely averted
a riot. Then we went to Elizabeth,
N.J., where we were held in a hotel
for three days, and asked to talk on
the radio so people wouldn’t riot. So
our music has been very effective.
“Dancing in the Street” was
banned in some cities that sum
mer because there were those
who felt the song was actually a
call to riot.
That hurt my feelings so very badly.
What I related the song to was my
experiences in Rio at Carnivale time,
and in New Orleans at Mardi Gras. It
was a time for people to forget who
they are and just get with each other
to be happy and loving and dance and
rejoice. It was a celebration, related to
spiritual things. My musical partners
at Motown and I, we helped in letting
people know it was all right to feel
anger, but you have to go from there
and find an answer and it’s love.
We’re dreamers, yes, but there’s a
peace in that dream. That everybody
can get along.
International Talent Management Inc.
Fighting fire and fear
elmar Brown had been a
II Detroit firefighter for four
If years and three weeks when
all hell broke loose - in the
fire station where he was assigned
during the riots.
One of fewer than three dozen
blacks in the department back then,
Brown, who retired in 1993 as a cap
tain, spices bitter memories with
laughter.
But it wasn’t funny to him when
the department brass transferred him
and some other black firefighters into
riot areas while allowing some white
firefighters to work in safer stations.
Days later it wasn’t funny when he
walked toward the station door after
a six-hour break only to be confronted
by a jittery National Guardsman who
cocked his gun at him. “The other
guys were laughing because they told
him I wasn’t a firefighter,” he says.
“They thought it was a joke.”
It wasn’t funny, he recalls, when
white firefighters on his rig shoved
two or three pistols in their belts even
though they had police escorts. “I
refused to ride with them because
they weren’t out to fight a fire, they
were going out to shoot somebody.
They were going out to shoot a nigger,
and if they couldn’t find one on the
street, guess who was most conve
nient?” As it turned Out, a white fire
captain sided with Brown and
ordered the men to leave their
weapons behind.
Firefighters, black and white, were
fair game that week, and skin color
offered no protection on the street.
“We were fighting a fire in a shoe
store when looters rushed into the
burning building to take shoes from
the shelves,” Brown says. “My captain
told me to stop that guy from taking
shoes, but the guy had a rifle. I said
he can take whatever he wants. I’m
just here to fight the fire.”
Another time a frightened citizen
“came up to us with a gun and
ordered us to protect his house,”
Brown says. Firefighters convinced
the man to leave, but he took several
lengths of hose with him - and no
one tried to stop him.
What did Brown learn from that
week? He learned that you can’t pre
dict how people will act in a crisis.
“Some of the people that you thought,
from a firefighter viewpoint, were
strong turned out to be weak, and
some who you thought were weak,
like that captain, stood up and were
strong.”
- Sunday Journal staff
Warren Professional Fire Fighters Union
“You have ^ s L° n g
our Support as it Takes 99
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LOCAL 1383 • AFL-CIO
Ken Behnke
President
Mark Schimanski
Vice President
Gary D. Micu
Secretary
Fred Helfmann
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PAGE 12
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
JULY 20, 1997
Remembering the Riots
Photographs by TONY SPINA / From the Tony Spina Collection in the Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, Wayne State University
Police and National Guardsmen confront a suspected looter who had a knife
in his back pocket. The man put up a fight before he was finally subdued.
Report on potential for riot
‘never saw the light of day’
Ed Boyer, a former reporter at both
the News and the Free Press, now
writes for the Los Angeles Times.
grew up in an area just south
of Highland Park, maybe three
| blocks or so out of the Highland
JKL* Park border, just east of
Woodward. I remember feeling a kind
of sadness because you could see
smoke spiraling not that far away.
The wail of sirens was constant.
I remember seeing people I knew,
friends and neighbors, begin to loot
neighborhood stores. Some of those
stores were owned by guys I had
grown up with, family-owned busi
nesses that had been passed down for
generations, like Felsenfeld market.
They’d been there forever. Strangers
from outside of the neighborhood
came along and threw a milk crate
through the window.. Then people
who lived right here in the neighbor
hood started looting. It was madness.
Actually, my biggest memory is
something that happened before. I
had been a reporter at the News in
1965 - there were two African-
American reporters, myself and Joe
Strickland - and Watts went up in
’65.1 went up to the city editor and
said, “You know, we pat ourselves on
the back here in Detroit and claim it
can never happen here. I want to go
out and talk to people,” and I wrote a
35-book story (35 pages) for the News
why a cross section of the black com
munity thought that not only could a
riot happen but it was likely to hap
pen. And the News refused to run it.
It never saw the light of day.


JULY 20, 1997
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 13
TrxE
Oakla>
PRES'
jGM will add staff in Pontiac, UAW
I
<* #«
a
"Ensnar
Hanging
■—■JT
Bonior vows to step up effort in lockout
New suburban chain seen as threat to Detroit dailies
Journal photo by REBECCA COOK
U.S. Rep. David Bonior promises to get more involved and to bring a new national focus
to the locked-out newspaper workers’ struggle.
Robin Fornoff
Journal Staff Writer
Congressman David Bonior has
been looking for a new cause since
almost single-handedly packing
House Speaker Newt Gingrich off to
the land of ethical disgrace and politi
cal oblivion.
Bonior believes he just may have
found it in Detroit.
Bonior, arrested July 11 for refusing
to leave The Detroit News building, is
promising more personal involvement
and a new, national focus on helping
the 2,000 locked-out Detroit newspa
per workers get back their jobs.
“I will do anything I can,” said
Bonior, declining to get more specific
but vowing to intensify involvement in
the struggle against The Detroit
News, Detroit Free Press and Detroit
Newspapers Inc., the business agent
for both dailies.
“You really have some scurrilous
people at those newspapers,” said
Bonior. ‘You have the editor of the
News admitting ... they slanted cover
age of the strike for their own purpos
es. You have that hypocritical editor at
the Free Press, Joe Stroud, who writes
an editorial calling for a federal law to
ban the use of replacement workers.
Then, a year later, Mr. Stroud and the
Free Press bring in replacement work
ers by the busloads to bust a strike.
“They don’t really care too much
about our community,” said Bonior,
who was born in Detroit and raised in
Hamtramck and East Detroit. “It’s
obvious by their conduct, and I am
moved by the injustice done to these
2,000 families.”
Bonior’s promises are hardly idle
threats, and he is no stranger to caus
es. Since his election to the U.S. House
of Representatives in 1976, the Mt.
Clemens Democrat has led floor fights
for Vietnam veterans, environmental
issues, human rights and job issues.
Bonior’s tenacity got him elected
congressional whip, the second-rank
ing position in the House Democratic
leadership.
Bonior’s seemingly sudden emer
gence into the newspaper strike isn’t
new at all. He has steadfastly sup
ported strikers, refusing to talk to
reporters or editors at the News and
Free Press since the strike began
more than two years ago. He was
always prepared to do what he could
and decided getting arrested would
add a new focus to the struggle at a
most strategic time - only days after
both newspapers were found guilty of
forcing the strike through illegal and
unfair labor practices and still refused
to take back their workers.
It came only days after a national
march on Detroit for the AFL-CIO-
sponsored Action! Motown protest. A
ground-swell the congressman sees as
part of a national trend, a backlash
from working people who are fed up
with downsizing and stagnant wages
See BONIOR, Page 15
PAPERS, From Page 3
that the price of the Oakland Press
was between $125 million and $135
million.
Several large chains are believed to
have bid for the Oakland Press.
Shepherd told Editor & Publisher that
the Press deal “was not an easy pur
chase. I had lots of competition.”
ABC Inc., a Walt Disney Corp. sub
sidiary, had publicly put the Press up
for sale. But it was not known that
The Macomb Daily and The Daily
Tribune were on the block.
“Shepherd says the three newspa
pers will keep their identities and
operate separately, except for a group
advertising rate,” the Oakland Press
reported Thursday.
Press Publisher Dale Duncan was
quoted as saying, “We expect we will
be meeting with the people in Macomb
to take a look at things that we could
join that would make sense, the obvi
ous being regional advertising rates.”
Shepherd told the Journal that the
papers’ focus on local news would con
tinue. “At the same time we are look
ing to be full-service newspapers,” he
said. “We want to be complete daily
newspapers.”
Shepherd gave these circulation fig
ures: for the Oakland Press, 86,000
daily, 106,000 Sunday; the Macomb
Daily, 60,000 daily, 85,000 Sunday; the
Daily Tribune, 21,000 daily, 24,000
Sunday.
The Oakland Press is a nonunion
paper, while employees of
Independent Newspapers are repre
sented by five of the six unions that
represent workers at the Detroit
dailies.
“Shepherd said he sees no reason
why the Oakland Press can’t remain a
nonunion shop,” the Oakland Press
Journal photo by REBECCA COOK
reported. “He said other (newspaper
companies) have both union and
nonunion papers.”
Shepherd told the Sunday Journal
that labor relations at the Macomb
Daily and Daily Tribune are good and
said management, employees and
unions had all played parts in the
paper’s success. “All three are key,” he
said.
In the July 5 Editor & Publisher,
Shepherd said this about the News
and Free Press:
“I think the (joint operation) has suf
fered from Day One. I think that was a
textbook case of how not to put a JO A
in place,” a reference to the joint oper
ating agreement the News and Free
Press put into effect in 1989 that
allowed them to join their business
operations and publish a joint edition
on weekends and holidays.
Since the strike, circulation losses in
Oakland County make the two dailies
much less of a factor, according to
Shepherd. “They’ve become a Wayne
County newspaper, serving a
Detroit/Wayne County market,” he
told E&P.
Shepherd told the Sunday Journal
he remembered seeing a Journal chart
that showed the Free Press’ and News’
audited circulation losses in each ZIP
code during the strike. He noted that
the papers’ losses in Macomb County
and north of 14 Mile Road were 40
percent.
But even without a strike, he said,
his purchases would have made sense.
“I think if there had never been a
strike I would have bought both news
papers” - the Oakland Press and the
Macomb Daily - “if they had been
available at a fair market price,”
Shepherd said. “There is no way to say
where their value would be if there
had been no strike.”


PAGE 14
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
JULY 20, 1997
Sit-down protesters finally face trial
the ULP strike notebook
Journal photo by PATRICIA BECK
Protest visits to the homes of newspaper employees and an advertiser marked the second strike anniversary.
By Alan Forsyth
and Robert Ourlian
Journal Staff Writers
D etroit City Council
President Maryann
Mahaffey is one of five
people who will stand trial
Tuesday for disorderly conduct in
connection with a peaceful rally last
Labor Day weekend.
At least 100 people sat down in
front of the Detroit News on Aug. 30,
while hundreds of others filled the
street. Twenty-one people were
arrested, including local union and
religious leaders and presidents of
the striking unions and their inter
nationals.
Requesting a jury trial were
Mahaffey; the Rev. Ed Rowe, pastor
of Central Methodist Church; A1
Fishman, director of the Jewish
Peace Council; Jeanie Wylie-
Kellermann, Witness editor and an
organizer of Readers United, and
David Mills, a locked-out member of
Teamsters Local 372.
“It’s not my conduct that is crimi
nal,” Mahaffey said. “Gannett and
Knight-Ridder are the ones disrupt
ing this community by forcing union
workers out of their jobs and by
refusing to settle this dispute. The
toll on the community is enormous.”
The trial starts at 10 a.m. at 36th
District Court, 421 Madison, Detroit.
Judge David Bradfield will hear the
case.
No freedom for ’em
Locked-out workers and their sup
porters weren’t welcome Friday at
the Freedom Forum’s Media Studies
Center, where Bob Giles has been
top man since June 1 after his
retirement as publisher of the
Detroit News.
A large motto in the Manhattan
lobby reads: “Free press, free speech,
free spirits.” But when the visitors
used free speech in the first-floor
exhibition gallery, the free spirits
called police to get them bounced.
Twenty-five unionists, including
six locked-out workers, paid three
visits to the Forum on Friday. Giles
was said to be out of town, but staff
members said he didn’t want to
meet with anybody from Detroit.
The crew also visited the office of
John L. Weinberg, the Knight-Ridder
director who is senior chairman of
Goldman Sachs & Co.
Further activities were planned
for the weekend.
Marking the day
Nearly 600 locked-out workers
and supporters commemorated the
second anniversary of the newspa
per strike by splitting into three
groups and visiting homes of indi
viduals associated with the newspa
pers.
One group went to the palatial
Grosse Pointe Shores mansion of Art
Van Elslander, owner of Art Van
Furniture, which has been a major
advertiser in the News and Free
Press the last two years.
Another dropped by the Dearborn
home of News business columnist
Jon Pepper. “No scab Pepper,” they
chanted. Police waited till the group
had left to issue a ticket to the police
liaison for breach of peace.
A third group visited News assis
tant managing editor George
Bullard, who has been responsible
for coverage of the strike/lockout;
picketed with UAW members at GM
Truck in Pontiac, then stopped to
see Detroit Newspapers spokeswom
an Susie Ellwood.
Afterward the demonstrators
gathered for hot dogs at UAW
Region 1A in Taylor.
Tell Frank Kelley
People who receive telephone sales
pitches from the News and Free
Press that include untrue state
ments may complain to Michigan
Attorney General Frank Kelley. “The
best way to do it is to send in a let
ter outlining the complaint to the
attorney general,” says Chris
Dewitt, Kelley’s director of commu
nications. “We have received some
complaints. We are looking at what
action Attorney General Kelley
could take in regard to the com
plaints. Nothing has been decided
yet.”
People who phone in complaints
are usually asked to send them as
letters.
The address is PO Box 30212,
Lansing, MI 48909.
Since the newspaper unions made
an unconditional offer to return to
work five months ago, telemarketers
representing the News and Free
Press have told people that the
strike is over and that most or all
strikers have returned to work (in
fact, fewer than 225 have).
Profits without proof
The News reported Tuesday that
“an official at Detroit Newspapers,
business agent for The Detroit News
and Detroit Free Press, said the
News was profitable in the second
quarter, but declined to release
specifics.”
The lack of specifics, or proof, is
standard practice for the papers in
reporting their earnings.
The Free Press claimed on July 8
that both dailies boosted second-
quarter earnings from a year earlier.
It said “advertising percentages” had
reached “85 percent of pre-strike lev
els.”
The News’ and Free Press’ most
recent published figures show circu
lation at roughly two-thirds of the
prestrike level.
Freudian slip?
The News’ “profits” article ended
with this flourish:
“Gannett also benefited from the
See NOTEBOOK, Page 15


JULY 20, 1997
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 15
mam
:,r
IPIhhI
WORKERS
mm
B» Bl SB UH
|BE DEFEATED!
Journal photo by REBECCA COOK
Dave Jewell, Teamsters Local 372, protests at The Detroit News building during activities
marking the second anniversary of the newspaper strike.
Case of jitters
costs papers
about $21,000
NOTEBOOK, From Page 14
end of a strike against The Detroit
News, Free Press and Detroit
Newspapers, which began July 13,
1995, and ended with an uncondition
al surrender by the unions on Feb.
14.”
In previous stories the News had
correctly referred to the unions’ move
as an “unconditional offer to return to
work.”
‘More, please’
Detroit Newspaper officials will
fork over another $21,192.52 to
Sterling Heights for police overtime
after receiving a letter about the
costs from City Manager Steve
Duchane this month.
The overtime resulted from “crowd
control preparations and increased
presence of police personnel to main
tain public order,” Duchane said. The
request for more money evidently
stems from the city’s overreaction to
Action! Motown ’97.
Stuff it!
The cashiers at 7-Eleven on Ridge
Road and Nine Mile in Ferndale have
to insert the color sections into the
news sections of the combined
Sunday News & Free Press every
week. They frequently grouse that it
isn’t part of their job. They’re right!
They’re doing the job of members of
Mailers Local 2040, who are locked
out. And so are many other workers
at drug stores, convenience stores
and other establishments all over the
metro area. Detroit Newspapers
claimed during contract negotiations
that they didn’t need all the mailers
to do these jobs. Apparently, the com
pany remains a bit shorthanded.
‘Unity for Contracts’
Inside Detroit Newspapers facili
ties and the Free Press, called-back
workers have begun sporting blue-
and-white buttons reading “Unity for
Contracts.”
‘Guilty’ in Roseville
Roseville City Council member
John Chirkun gave public notice that
the Detroit newspapers were found
guilty of violating U.S. labor laws and
applauded legal moves to return
locked-out workers to their jobs.
During a council meeting that was
televised citywide, Chirkun held up a
copy of the Sunday Journal’s special
edition with the headline that reads
“Guilty!” and said, “The newspapers
lost.” He noted that 47 families in
Roseville are involved in the labor
dispute, and thanked Roseville citi
zens for contributing to locked-out
workers’ relief funds, for buying the
Sunday Journal and for boycotting
the News and Free Press.
“Some people would wonder why a
city councilman would make a state
ment about striking workers when it
did not have a direct impact on the
city of Roseville,” Chirkun said.
“It’s to give information to the citi
zens of Roseville, for us not to turn
our backs on our fellow men and
women when they are in need,
because this is what I feel the city of
Roseville is all about.”
Free Press to lose bureaus
Knight-Ridder has taken control of
foreign reporting functions away
from its individual newspapers and
will fold them into the chain’s cen
tralized operations, prompting muted
objections around the country.
Seen by many as further dilution
of news coverage and sharpened
focus on profits, the move will trans
fer the duties of reporters and edi
tors in at least eight news bureaus
worldwide to company headquarters
in Miami. The Free Press loses its
Africa and European bureaus under
the scheme.
Update: GE contract
The General Electric Co., whose
CEO Jack Welch bragged about
showing the world how a company
could survive during a strike, has
agreed to contracts covering nearly
28,000 workers. The contracts were
ratified recently.
Contracts provide for wage increas
es of between 8.75 percent and 13
percent over three years, including
cost-of-living adjustments, according
to wire service reports. Unions
gained the contracts and wage
increases, giving ground on issues of
outside contractors and job security.
Alan Forsyth is a locked-out Detroit
News copy editor. Robert Ourlian is a
locked-out Detroit News reporter and
member of a Newspaper Guild bar
gaining committee.
Bonior skewers ‘new corporate ideology’
BONIOR, From Page 13
while corporations post record profits
and award CEOs with annual salaries
in the millions.
“There is a movement among work
ers going on out there,” said Bonior.
“You may not read about it in the
mainstream media or see it on televi
sion news, but it is happening. I’m see
ing it. I’ve been in California marching
with 50,000 in support of strawberry
workers.”
Bonior said the movement is driven
by average citizens fed up with corpo
rate greed and laws that give multi
national corporations seemingly more
rights in this country than the people
who worked to make this country
great.
In a recent speech to the National
Press Club, Bonior noted that CEOs
made 12 times as much as the average
worker in 1960. By 1974, it was 35
times as much. Today the average
CEO makes 135 times more than an
average worker.
“How do we explain that?” asked
Bonior. “How do we explain that at a
time when productivity is climbing ...
and profits reach record highs ... and
CEO salaries reached all-time highs
... and the stock market reached all-
time highs ... that the wage growth of
average working people reached all-
time lows?
“Working people all over America
have been downsized and dismissed
by a new corporate ideology that has
lost sight of social responsibility and
American citizenship. Right now, we
are seeing a corporate culture in
America that has devalued the digni
ty of work, the security of the family
and the fabric of our community.”
Bonior believes things can change
for the better for the average
American. But organized labor has to
be a leader in seeking that change, he
said.
“It’s out there ... the desire to
change this,” said Bonior. “What labor
has to do is get back the moral imper
ative. People have to see that what
the labor movement does matters in
their lives. It is what got us the gains
labor secured in the past... weekends,
the 40-hour workweek ... paid vaca
tions and pensions ... the middle
class.
“Moral leadership is critical to labor
and they lost it over that last 20 years
or so,” Bonior said. “I think they’re
regaining it under guys like (AFL-CIO
President) John Sweeney. Now they
have to build on it.”
Bonior said building means organiz
ing, noting that labor represents just
10 percent of workers in the United
States compared to about 25 percent
three decades ago.
“The only people who can stand up
to these corporations is labor,” said
Bonior.
“And you only do this stuff through
a struggle.”
Advertisement
‘Voices of the Strike’
A book of portraits and
words of more than 40
members of the Detroit
Newspaper Guild.
To order, send a check or money
order
for $25 to:
George Waldman
Detroit Journalism Photography
P.O. Box 1273
Detroit, Ml 48231


PAGE 16
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
JULY 20, 1997
UAW ends long strike at GM with major gains
Ford’s second-quarter profit is Big 3’s biggest ever
By Martha Hindes
Journal Automotive Writer
Ford Motor Co. trounced its com
petitors on the profit side during the
second quarter of 1997. In announc
ing its earnings last week, the compa
ny claimed the best profit report for
any quarter by any auto company -
ever.
That statement, from Ford financial
chief and executive vice president
John Devine, sets the stage for a con
tinuing battle between Ford and its
other Big Three competitors, General
Motors Corp. and Chrysler Corp.
From April through June, Ford
reported net earnings of $2.53 billion,
compared with $1,093 billion during
the comparable quarter of 1996. Ford
said an $1.8 billion reduction in costs
contributed to the record profits. The
savings came from lower costs for
materials, supplier efficiencies and
the effect of vehicle teams in the
plants to improve production and
increase quality.
That reduction in costs surpassed
the $1 billion cost-cutting goal Ford
had set for the entire year. Now the
company expects by year-end to pass
the $2 billion mark in reducing costs.
Ford has been closing the gap with
its No. 1 competitor, GM, in recent
months, solidifying its more stable
financial base with a less adversarial
relationship with its unions.
GM, which has been losing market
share to its domestic and foreign com
petitors, needed nonautomotive gains
to post a record quarter for the com
pany. GM reported total net income of
$2.1 billion for the second quarter,
compared with $1.9 billion a year ear
lier.
In the automotive sector, however,
GM lost about 96,000 units of produc
tion from two extended assembly line
plant strikes. The company’s North
American operations, which cover
auto production, were $474 million for
the quarter, off from $705 million the
previous year, for a $375 million after
tax decline.
Chrysler, which also had a lengthy
strike in the second quarter, reported
its earnings the previous week, post
ing second-quarter profits of $483 mil
lion. Those were down $554 million
from last year when the company
earned $1,037 billion.
UAW, From Page 1
the contract proposal was reached,
GM said: “We believe we reached an
agreement that addresses the needs of
our represented employees and also
enables General Motors to meet its
pre-established competitive targets.”
Most workers seemed overjoyed at
the contract, which was reached late
Wednesday after marathon talks by
UAW and GM bargainers.
“Damn right we like it,” said Wanda
Cupp, 47, a Pontiac resident who has
worked at the plant for five years. “All
we want is to go back to work.”
Another worker, who identified him
self only as J. Moore of Pontiac and
has worked at the complex for 20
years, said the contract gives the
workers “a few things.” He noted that
GM will have to pay for the more than
3,300 grievances resolved during the
bargaining at a cost of more than $4
million.
Another $5 million will go as July 4
holiday week pay for the strikers.
The 557 jobs that will be returned to
the plant include 282 in production
and 275 in skilled trades.
“Another big thing is they have con
tract language effectively stopping
subcontracting of normal mainte
nance work,” said UAW spokesman
Reg McGhee. That kind of equipment
maintenance and repair work is done
by skilled trades workers.
UAW Vice President Richard
Shoemaker, who heads the union’s
GM department, said the new con
tract addresses “the concerns that the
members so courageously fought for.”
However, he criticized GM for fos
tering an anti-worker mentality in
claiming its problems have been
caused by having too many workers,
and he said excessive overtime threat
ens the health and safety of workers.
The result, Shoemaker said, has been
a loss of trust by GM’s work force.
And he pointed out that the compa
ny did not address the main issues
until there was a lengthy strike. “The
union is not pleased that the company
took so long to offer a basis for this set
tlement,” he said.
Journal photo by DAYMON J. HARTLEY
UAW Local 594 members Jim Kennedy, left, and Roger Ladd discuss the proposed con
tract before the ratification vote at the Pontiac Silverdome.
One factor that may have prompted
GM to reach a settlement was the
company has two more strike dead
lines looming. One is at GM’s power
train plant in Warren, the other at the
Delphi plant in Anderson, Ind., that
makes headlamps and bumpers. A
strike at either of those component
plants could quickly shut down other
GM manufacturing facilities.
Although no union official would con
firm the effect of the strike deadlines
on the Pontiac pact, it would seem
that they might have moved GM
toward a settlement.
The strike began just before mid
night April 22 when overworked auto
workers took to the streets to protest a
shortage of workers and an inability
to take time off, a situation that had
been building at the plant since the
mid-1980s when GM stopped hiring
there.
Autoworkers complained that GM
failed to live up to its contract to
return one worker for every two who
retired. They told stories of staffing
shortages so severe that GM even sent
white-collar and supervisory person
nel to fill in on the assembly line.
In some cases, it took two or three
untrained salaried workers to do the
work of one unionized autoworker, a
practice that often resulted in poor
quality and a need for many vehicle
repairs.
Union members also told of one
worker who, because he could not get
someone to replace him on the line,
was forced to urinate in his pants.
Some industry watchers had ques
tioned the wisdom of the UAW taking
on GM for such a protracted period.
Insiders also had questioned whether
GM or the union gained status from
the lengthy walkout. Local 594 has
long been considered a somewhat
maverick local, standing strong
against labor violations not only for its
own workers but for those in other
unions as well.
Industry analyst David Andrea with
Roney & Co. in Detroit said that GM’s
early offer to bring in temporary
workers had seemed a “reasonable”
compromise to understaffing at the
plant. He said the lengthy strike had
forced the company to make its truck
plant in Oshawa, Ontario, the lead
plant for the new full-size pickup
truck to debut in 1999. Previously,
Pontiac had been scheduled as the pri
mary source during the ramp-up
phase.
But union leaders had rejected tem
porary workers for fear it could start a
trend toward a permanent work force
of temporary employees.
Former UAW President Doug
Fraser, now professor of labor studies
at Wayne State University, said that
while he did not know the details of
the Pontiac strike, the industry stan
dard prohibits any excessive work
loads.
“The standard is that no single
worker should be overburdened,” he
said. “That’s the rule. I don’t care if the
strike is over two workers who are
overburdened. If they can’t get relief
and they are clearly overburdened,
then that justifies a strike in my view.”


TNT
Tom Berenger stars as Teddy Roosevelt, backed by his Volunteer Calvary, in TNT’s two-
part “Rough Riders,” at 8 p.m. Monday and Tuesday.
TV is out to
give your kids
“Goosebumps”
this week and
provide a little
jolt or two for
you as well. In
case the fictional
tales aren’t scary enough, the all-too-
real 1967 riots come back in vivid
detail.
■ “Goosebumps,” 7 tonight, ABC
(Channel 7 in Detroit) - Wooden you
know that if a dummy can scare you
once, he’ll come back to try it again?
The increasingly popular series of
prime-time specials based on the
child-chilling books of R.L. Stine
brings back Slappy, the evil ventrilo
quist’s doll with a mind of his own,
for an episode entitled “Night of the
Living Dummy III.” This time, Slappy
enlists the aid of an equally brainless
partner, a street thug named Rocky,
to teach two young pranksters a
frightening lesson.
■ “Rough Riders,” 8 tonight
(repeated at 10 p.m. and midnight
Monday) and 8 p.m. Monday (repeat
ed at 10 p.m. and midnight Tuesday),
TNT - Noteworthy for the last screen
performance by the late Brian Keith,
who died June 24, the latest page of
revisionist history from Ted Turner’s
moviemaking book is also distin
guished by a bravura performance
from Tom Berenger, admittedly
nobody’s first choice to play Teddy
Roosevelt charging up San Juan Hill.
Director/co-writer John Milius lavish
ly weaves the story of Roosevelt’s
Volunteer Cavalry, a ragtag collection
of cowpokes and rich boys with
almost no military training, and their
boldness during the Spanish-
American War. Sam Elliott, Gary
Busey, George Hamilton, Chris Noth
(“Law and Order”) and Brad Johnson
also lead the miniseries.
■ “Sinbad’s Summer Jam 3: ’70s
Soul Music Festival,” 9 tonight,
HBO - You’ve simply got to hand it
to Sinbad: He has cooked up one of
the sweetest scams in entertainment
history. For the past three years, the
Michigan-born funnyman has staged
the R&B-concert equivalent of
Woodstock in exotic locales and
helped promote travel packages for
fans. He gets to hear the music he
loved as a youth in glorious vacation
getaways, turns
the whole event
into HBO spe
cials and gets
paid for it! Wish
I’d thought of it.
This year the
funk falls on
Aruba, with Sinbad’s comedy setting
the stage for performances by the
Bar-Kays, Jeffrey Osborne, Evelyn
“Champagne” King, Cameo, Larry
Graham and Graham Central Station
and, from his home state, George
Clinton and the Temptations.
■ “The Hunger,” 9 tonight,
Showtime - Gratuitously sexual erot
ic dramas have become the norm for
original cable series, particularly on
Showtime, so why shouldn’t the best
brother act in the business get in on
the fun? British directors Tony and
Ridley Scott, who between them can
claim such groundbreaking film cred
its as “Blade Runner,” “Alien,”
“Thelma and Louise” and “True
Romance,” make their first foray into
television as executive producers of a
string of nightmarish tales based on
classic short stories. A trilogy of short
films kicks off the series, beginning
with an episode called “The Swords”
about an American tourist (Balthazar
Getty) who travels to London and
falls in love with a woman (Amanda
Ryan) who appears to be not of this
world. Actor Terence Stamp menac
ingly introduces each installment as
“The Host,” this show’s version of the
Crypt Keeper.
■ “Mission Genesis,” 7:30 p.m.
Monday (repeated at 11:30 p.m.), Sci-
Fi Channel - The year is 2695. We’re
all dead, and so are all of our descen
dants (the plague, you know). How-
“Dial M for Murder,” 11 today,
A&E; “Sea of Love,” 12:30 today,
USA; “Bonfire of the Vanities,”
1:30 today, Channel 20; “To Have
and Have Not,” 2 today, Channel
56; “Fatal Attraction,” 3 today,
USA; “Mr. Hobbs Takes a
Vacation,” 5:30 today and 11
tonight, American Movie Classics;
“The Silence of the Lambs,”
7:30 tonight, Lifetime; “Patriot
Games,” 10:10 tonight, Cinemax;
“A Time to Kill,” 11:30 tonight
ever, those future humans were
shrewd enough to launch a spaceship
full of youthful-looking clones, armed
with a boatload of DNA samples and
orders to repopulate the Earth. That’s
the premise of the Sci-Fi Channel’s
first original series, inspired by the
children’s novels of Ken Catran. It’s
kind of like MTVs “The Real World”
in outer space, with a sextet of beau
tiful, counterfeit crew members head
ed by Kelly Taylor, Nicole deBoer and
Gordon Michael Woolvett.
■ “The Godfather,” 9 p.m. Tuesday
and Wednesday; “The Godfather
Part II,” 9 p.m., Thursday and
Friday, USA - Perhaps you watched
the two-part “Godfather, Part III” last
week on free TV and wished it was
an offer you had refused. Better to
remember Mario Puzo’s “Godfather”
in all its gory greatness with this
pairing of the immortal film original
and the gorgeously mounted Part II
“prequel,” presented in a mob over
four consecutive nights. Gee, this is
and 12:25 a.m. Friday, HBO;
“Mommie Dearest,” 8:15 a.m.
and 5:45 p.m. Monday, Showtime;
“A Man for All Seasons,” 9:50
a.m. Monday, Movie Channel;
“The French Connection,” 4
p.m. Monday and 5:15 p.m. Friday,
Movie Channel; “Going My Way,”
5:15 p.m. Monday, American Movie
Classics; “Who’s Afraid of
Virginia Woolf?” 9 p.m. Monday
and 12:15 a.m. Tuesday, American
Movie Classics.
almost as good as owning that com
memorative “Godfather” video boxed
set.
■ “P.O.V.: Girls Like Us,” 10 p.m.
Tuesday (repeated at 2 a.m.
Wednesday), PBS (Channel 56 in
Detroit) - The Grand Jury Prize win
ner for best documentary at this
year’s Sundance Film Festival is the
culmination of four years and hun
dreds of hours of footage by filmmak
ers Jane C. Wagner and Tina
DiFeliciantonio, who set up shop in
South Philadelphia to record the blos
soming of four teenage girls in a
teeming urban ghetto, trying to nego
tiate past guns, gangs and sex on
their way to adulthood. Their stories
are told without judgment or com
mentary. One of the girls makes it
through to college. The others? Watch.
■ “Perspective on Detroit: July
1967,” 11:35 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday,
Channel 7 - It’s an anniversary many
metro Detroiters would just as soon
not commemorate: The 1967 riots
resulted in 43 deaths, more than 700
injuries, $50 million in property dam
age and a shift in the racial politics of
this city that endures to this day. In a
three-part series, the riots are put in
perspective through the eyes of police
officers, firefighters, community lead
ers and residents who lived through
the chaos. Rather than being forced to
use some wide-eyed, local-news new
comer to anchor the reports, Channel
7 is blessed to have Erik Smith, one of
our city’s most experienced and artic
ulate telejournalists who was there to
cover the riots as a young reporter, as
its host.
Jim
McFarlin
Highlights
JIMMY MACK’S MAGNIFICENT MOVIE MENU
Fact and fiction
will scare you stiff
JULY 20, 1997
PAGE 17


SUNDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON
JULY 20,1997
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 I 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 I 4:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
FOX | Q | Eyewitness Weekend
NBC
Fox News Sunday
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Tarzan: Epic Adventures |National Geo.
Adventures of Sinbad ® |NFL Films
Highlander: The Series
Newsbeat Today Sunday
Today (In Stereo) ® Newsbeat [ Home Bid. Meet the Press!
Siskel |PGA Golf: British Open Championship -■ Final Round. (Live) I
Columbo “By Dawn’s Early Light"
Lighter Side All Star Golf Shoot-Out | Fame |LPGA Golf (Live)
ABC
News
This Week [
Spotlight |Auto Racing: PPG CART World Series -- Toronto
CBC
Cottage
Gardener
Coronation Street (R)
50 Up 35
Alive! 35
Man Alive |Undrcrrent |Canada
Auto Racing: PPG CART World Series -- Molson Toronto. (Live) 35
Sunday Arts
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|J.Kennedy
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Dream Big Oscar’s
All Dogs Go
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Movie: ★★V2 “Little Heroes" (1991)
Movie: ★* “The Bonfire of the Vanities" (1990, Drama) Tom Hanks.
Beverly Hills, 902101
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Strike Force
Sharks
Jumanji 35 Mouse
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Arthur I
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McLaughlin |0ff Rec’rd
Movie: ★★★% “To Have and Have Not” (1944, Drama)
Block by Block
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Executive
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Sunday Morning!
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Movie: **’/2 "Where Sleeping Dogs Lie" (1992)
Sports Show [
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
(7:00) Movie: “Don’t Look" | Breakfast With the Arts
Movie: *** 1 /2 “Dial M for Murder" (1954) Ray Milland.
Movie: *** “10 Rillington Place"(1971, Mystery) |Biography This Week (R) |Am. Justice |Am. Justice
AMC
(7:00) Movie: "The Spirit of St. Louis" |Movie: ** “Leave It to Blondie" [ 1945)
Movie: “The Treasure of Lost Canyon"
Perils
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Sumo | Boxing | ESPNews
Horse Racing (Live)
FAM
In Touch 35
Animal
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Movie: *** “Angel in My Pocket" (1969) Andy Griffith.
Movie: *** “Who Will Love My Children?" (1983)
Kane and Abel
LIFE
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Baby
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Golden
Golden
Movie: “Jonathan: The Boy Nobody Wanted" (1992)
One West Waikiki (R)
Mysteries
Movie: ** "Secrets of a Married Man"
NICK
Muppets
Tiny Toon
Looney Tunes
Rugrats 35
Beavers
Hey Arnold!
Monsters
Rocko | My Brother
Pete & Pete
SpaceCase
You Do |Crazy Kids
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Salute |Temple | Land-Lost
SCIFI
Paid Prog.
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Contact
In Space
Anti-Gravity
Beyond
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Web
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Movie: ★* "The Guyver"(1992) Mark Hamill.
TBS
Jetsons
Flintstones
Flintstones
Saved-Bell
Fam. Mat.
Movie: *** “Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins" (1985)
Auto Racing: NASCAR Winston Cup -- Pennsylvania 500. (Live)
TLC
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TNT
Taz-Mania
Scooby Dooby Doo
Gilligan
In the Heat of the Night
In the Heat of the Night
Movie: *** “The Horse Soldiers"(1959, Adventure) John Wayne. |Movie: *** “McLintock!" (1963, Western) John Wayne.
USA
Action Man
Uitraforce
Fighter
Mortal K
Dragon | Wing Cmdr.
WWF Superstars
Wings El iMovie: *** “Sea of Love" (1989, Drama) Al Pacino. (In Stereo) 35
Movie: **★'/2 “Fatal Attraction" (1987, Suspense) 35
DISN
Chip-Dale
Amazing
Animals
Animal
Movie: “Snoopy, Come/7ome”(1972) 35 |Movie: **'/4 "BenjitheHunted"(1987) jSitters |Flash
Torkelsons |Ready-Not
Inside Out
Goof Troop |lnsideGeor | “Homewrd"
HBO
Little Lulu
Hero
Movie: **’/:2 “Chances Are" (1989) Cybill Shepherd. 351Inventors’ Special (R) 35
Movie: ★★Vi “The Lion of Africa" (1987, Adventure) 35
Movie: ** 1 /2 “Pee-wee’s Big Adventure"
Movie: -k'h “Black Sheep" (1996) 35
MAX
(6:30) Movie
Movie: *’/2 “Face the Music" (1993)
Movie: **★ “Clueless" (1995) Alicia Silverstone. SB
Movie: *** 1 /2 “True Grit" (1969) John Wayne. ‘G’ 35
Movie: *★ “House of Cards" (1993) Kathleen Turner.
*★* “Dunston Checks In"
PASS
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Baseball I Bowling: Michigan Majors.
Tennis: ATP Legg Mason Classic -- Semifinal
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SHO
(7:50) Movie: “My Boy."
My Life-Dog
GoodBurg
Movie: *★ “Robin of Locksley” I 1996) Devon Sawa.
Movie:** “Bingo" (1991, Comedy) ’PG’ |Movie:** “Canadian Bacon" (1995) 35 |Movie: "Daisies in December" (1995) | “Jefferson"
TMC
(7:30) Movie: “Invisible"
Movie: ** "FatherHood" (1993) ‘PG-13’ |Movie: *** "Moonlightand Valentino"(1995) ‘R’ 35 jMovie: *** "Mortal Thoughts"(1991) |Movie: “Kurt Vonnegut’s Harrison Bergeron"(1995) ‘R’ |Movie: “Cyber-Tracker2"
SUNDAY EVENING JULY 20,1997
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00 1:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
O
FOX
News
M*A*S*H
“Pilot” 35
Extra (In Stereo) 35
Goosebumps “Night of
the Living Dummy III" 35
Simpsons
(In Stereo)
King of the
Hill (R) 35
X-Files “Unrequited" (R)
(In Stereo) 35
News
Sports Zone
Cheers 35
M*A*S*H
(Part 2 of 2)
Highlander: The Series
"The Stone of Scone” (R)
Flipper “Ebb Tide" (R)
O
NBC
LPGA Golf: Big Apple
Classic -- Final Round. 35
News
NBC Nightly
News 35
Dateline (In Stereo) 35
3rd Rock-
Sun
Movie: *** “Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story" (1993, Biography) Jason
Scott Lee. Based on the life and career of the martial arts star. 35
News
Sports Final
Edition
Locker
Room
Dumb
Criminal
Paid
Program
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Program
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ABC
Cycling: Tour de France.
News
ABC Wld
News
Second Noah “The
Choice” (R) (In Stereo) 35
Home
Videos
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Movie: “Telling Secrets" (1993, Mystery) A detective
matches wits with a seductive murder suspect. 35
News
Sunday
Sports
Matlock “The Last Laugh”
(In Stereo) 35
Inside
Edition
Entertainers
(In Stereo)
O
CBC
Music
Works
Street
Cents 35
Newsworld
Int’l
Business
World
Road to Avonlea Izzy’s
eccentric aunt. (R) 35
Wind at My Back 35
Hearts & Minds (Part 4 of
4)
Sunday
Report 35
Venture 35
Auto Racing: PPG CART World Series - Molson
Toronto. From Exhibition Place in Toronto.
(Off Air)
0D
WB
Baywatch “Let the Games
Begin” (R) (In Stereo) 35
Dr. Quinn, Medicine
Woman “Pike’s Peace" 35
NickFreno: Parent
Teacher ’Hood (R) 35
Buffy the Vampire Slayer
"Nightmares" (In Stereo)
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Ever After
Wayans
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Highway
Patrol
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Patrol
Jack Van
Impe
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Save Our Streets (R) (In
Stereo)
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©
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(4:00) Movie
Star Trek: Deep Space
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Home
Improve.
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Improve.
News 35
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Roseanne
(In Stereo)
Transition
Straight
Talk
Kenneth Copeland (In
Stereo)
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©
PBS
The
Johnsons
Healthweek
(In Stereo)
National Geographic on
Assignment
All Creatures Great and
Small “Faint Hearts”
Alien Empire (R) (In
Stereo) (Part 1 of 3) 35
Masterpiece Theatre “Sharpe” Richard Sharpe tries to
reach his family at siege of Badajoz before his enemies.
When a Kid Is Gay (In
Stereo)
Masterpiece Theatre “Sharpe” Richard Sharpe tries to
reach his family at siege of Badajoz before his enemies.
©
CBS
Sports Show: Boxing.
(Live) 35
CBS News
In Depth
Detroit
60 Minutes (In Stereo) 35
Touched by an Angel
“Have You Seen Me” 35
Movie: “A Mother's Gift” (1995) Nancy McKeon. A wife
gives up her dreams to go westward with her husband.
Seinfeld (In
Stereo) 35
Mad About
You 35
In Depth
Detroit (R)
Sports
Machine
Cape "Pilot Part 2 of 2” (R)
(In Stereo) (Part 2 of 2) 35
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
Unexplained “Questioning
Astrology" (R)
Home Again
(R)
Home Again
(R)
Ancient Mysteries
“Temples of Eternity” (R)
Haunted Houses Ghost stories from the Myrtle
Plantation and other haunted houses. (R)
America’s Castles
“Return to Newport”
Mysteries of the Bible
“Noah and the Flood” (R)
Haunted Houses Ghost stories from the Myrtle
Plantation and other haunted houses. (R)
AMC
(3:30) Movie
Movie: “Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation” (1962) A banker
and his family vacation at a run-down beach house.
Behind the
Screen
Hollywood Commandos
(R)35
Movie: ★**’/;2 “Pillow Talk"(1959) Rock Hudson. An
interior decorator shares a party line with a playboy. 35
Movie: "Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation" (1962) A banker
and his family vacation at a run-down beach house.
Behind the
Screen
Movie:
“Pillow Talk"
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Senior PGA Golf: Burnet Senior Classic -- Final
Round. From Coon Rapids, Minn. (Live)
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assault victim comes out of a 14-month coma.
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Intimate Portrait “Carol
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Betty White
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Movie: “Dead Fire" (1997) Matt Frewer. (In Stereo) 35
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Making
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National Geographic Explorer “Journal: Camel
Derby”; “Mysterious World of the Mini-Beasts.” 35
Movie: ** 1 /2 "Uncommon Valor" (1983, Drama) A
father goes after his son, who is missing in Vietnam.
National Geographic Explorer “Journal: Camel
Derby”; “Mysterious World of the Mini-Beasts.” (R) 35
Paid
Program
Paid
Program
TLC
DNA Detectives (R)
Science
Sea Tek (R)
MedDetect |Trauma-ER
How’d They Do That?
Ancient Prophecies
Ancient Prophecies
How’d They Do That?
Ancient Prophecies
Ancient Prophecies
TNT
(2:30) Movie
Movie: *★* “City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly’s Gold" (1994) Billy
Crystal. Mitch and friends ride out in search of hidden treasure.
Movie: “Rough Riders" (1997) Tom Berenger. The
story of Theodore Roosevelt's famous cavalry group. 35
Movie: "Rough Riders” (1997) Tom Berenger. The
story of Theodore Roosevelt’s famous cavalry group. 35
Movie: “Rough Riders" (1997) Tom Berenger. The
story of Theodore Roosevelt's famous cavalry group. ®
USA
(3:00) Movie
Movie: ** “Body of Evidence" (1992, Mystery) Madonna, Willem
Dafoe. A defense attorney falls for his sultry client. (In Stereo)
Pacific Blue “Daystalker”
(R) (In Stereo) 35
Silk Stalkings “Divorce,
Palm Beach Style” (R) 35
La Femme Nikita
“Treason” (In Stereo) 35
Big Easy “Yellow Queen
in the Fires of Hell" 35
Silk Stalkings “The
Runway Strip" (In Stereo)
Paid
Program
Paid
Program
DISN
(4:30) Movie: “Homeward
Bound: Incredible Journey"
Flash
Forward 1®
Torkelsons
(In Stereo)
Movie: ** 1 /;2 “Balto"( 1995, Adventure)
Voices of Kevin Bacon. (In Stereo) ‘G’ 35
Movie: ★** "White Fang 2: Myth of the
White Wor (1994) Scott Bairstow. ‘PG’
Movie: *★* "Homeward Bound: The
Incredible Journey" (1993) Robert Hays.
Movie: ** 1 /2 “Benji the Hunted” (1987,
Adventure) Benji. (In Stereo) ‘G’ 35
Movie: "Voyage to the
Bottom of the Sea" (1961)
HBO
Movie: ** 1 /!2 “Chances Are" (1989) Cybill Shepherd. A
reincarnated lawyer stumbles into his former wife’s life.
Conspiracy
Theory
Movie: "The Cherokee Kid" (1996,
Comedy) Sinbad. (In Stereo) ‘PG-13’ 35
Sinbad’s Summer Jam 3: ’70s Soul Music Festival
Comic Sinbad hosts a musical celebration from Aruba.
Dennis
Miller (R) 35
Movie: *** “A Time to Kill" (1996, Drama) Sandra Bullock. A
lawyer's defense of a black man arouses the Klan’s ire. ‘R’ 35
MAX
(4:15) Movie
Movie: **% "Sabrina” (1995, Comedy) Harrison Ford. A chauffeur’s
daughter awakens love in a rich workaholic. (In Stereo) ‘PG’ 35
Movie: “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" (1989)
Indy's hunt for his missing father leads to the Holy Grail.
Movie: *** “Patriot Games" (1992) Harrison Ford. A
former CIA agent is stalked by a vengeful IRA terrorist.
Movie: ** “Live Nude Girls" (1995,
Comedy) Dana Delany. (In Stereo) ‘R’ ®
** “Painted
Hero” (1995)
PASS
Tennis |Tennis: Joe Dumars Cl.
USISL Soccer: Connecticut at Long Island
Tennis: A & P Classic -- Final. From Mahwah, N.J.
Auto Racing: Metal Rodeo |Fame
Gyro Seven
SHO
(4:40) Movie: “Jefferson in Paris" (1995) Romantic
troubles arise for ambassador Thomas Jefferson. 35
Movie: **V4 "Powder" (1995) Mary Steenburgen. An
albino outcast possesses amazing mental powers. 35
Hunger (In
Stereo)
Hunger (In
Stereo)
Hunger
“Necros"
Outer Limits A scientist
has a close encounter. 35
Movie: “The Quick and the
gunslinger enters a deadly q
Dead" (1995) A female
uick-draw competition. ‘R’
Movie: “The
Babysitter"
TMC
(4:00) Movie
Movie: ** “Class of 1999"(1990) Experimental
androids whip futuristic students into shape. ‘R’
Movie: “Fargo" (1996) A businessman's
kidnapping scheme spins out of control.
Movie: ★*’/2 “Dead Presidents" (1995) Larenz Tate. A
jobless Vietnam vet and his buddies organize a heist. 35
Movie: “The Curse of Inferno" (1996,
Comedy) Pauly Shore, Janine Turner. ‘R’
Movie: *'/2 “Night Fire"(1994,
Suspense) Shannon Tweed. ‘R’
LOCAL 82
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NORTHWEST LOCAL 163
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MONDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON JULY 21,1997 |
8:00
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FOX
0
Eyewitness Morning
Fox After Breakfast SB
Crook & Chase (In Stereo)
Extra® | Hollywood
News
Real TV ®
Geraldo Rivera (R) ffi
Dating ) Newlywed
Ricki Lake (R)
Rosie O’Donnell (R) ffl
NBC
O
(7:00) Today (In Stereo) SB
Maury SB
Jerry Springer
Jenny Jones (In Stereo)
News
Jeopardy!
Days of Our Lives ffi
Another World ffl
Sally
Montel Williams ffi
ABC
o
Good Morning America
Regis & Kathie
Maureen O’Boyle
Rolonda (R)
News
Pt. Charles
All My Children ffi
One Life to Live ffi
General Hos
}ital ffi
Oprah Winfrey ffl
CBC
o
(7:00) CBC Morning News
Playground |SesamePk
Theodore |Mr. Dressup
Wimzie | Pacific Rim
Midday ®
Encore to Pamela Wallin
E.N.G “Final Cut” ffi
Coronation
Urban P.
Jonovision
The Bill
WB
0D
Gargoyles
JonQuest
In the Heat of the Night
Medicine Woman
700 Club (Left in Progress)
Beverly Hills, 90210®
Baywatch ffi
Bzzz!
Bananas
Garfield
Timon
BugsDaffy
Animaniacs
UPN
©
Mask
Menace
Bobby | Dinosaurs
Blossom ®
Step-Step
Sunset Beach ®
Jeffersons
All-Family
Sanford |Good Times
King Arthur
Aladdin ffi
Batman
Eekistravag
Beetleborgs
Twist
PBS
©
Tots TV ffl
Station
Sesame Street (In Stereo)
Barney
Mr Rogers
Storytime | Reading
Lamb Chop
Puzzle
Sesame Street (In Stereo)
Barney
Couch
Arthur ffi
Magic Bus
C. Sandiego
Wishbone
CBS
©
(7:00) This Morning SB
Rockford Files
Guiding Light (In Stereo)
Price Is Right ®
WKRP
Young and the Restless |Bold&B.
As the World Turns®
Gordon Elliott (R)
Murphy
Designing
A&E
Columbo “Short Fuse” |Columbo “Suitable for Framing" |New Mike Hammer
Quincy “Dying for a Drink" |Law & Order “Discord” ® |Columbo “Short Fuse” |Columbo "Suitable for Framing”
AMC
(6:00) Movie
Movie: -k-kV,2 "CallMe Mister"(1951) |Movie: ★★★V2 "Pillow Talk”(1959) Rock Hudson. SB
Movie: *★ “Pin Up G/r/" (1944, Comedy) jMovie: "Lifeboat" (1944, Drama) jMovie: ★★★ "0. Henry’s Full House" (1952, Drama)
BET
Life
Paid Prog.
Benson
Hit List
Video Vibrations
Planet Groove Top Twenty
Rap City
DISC
Paid Prog.
Paid Prog.
Cuisine
Graham K.
Home Matters (R)
Housesmart! (R)
Start |lnterior Mot.
Home Matters (R)
Housesmart! (R)
Interior Mot. |Start
Great Chefs
Great Chefs
ESPN
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Auto Racing: PPG CART World Series - Toronto
NCAA: Champ.
NFL Great
NFL Great
FAM
Father Dowling Mysteries
Waltons “The Outsider”
700 Club | FitTV
Rescue 911 (In Stereo)®
Home & Family (In Stereo)
ShopDrop | Shopping
Animal
Animal
LIFE
Baby
Kids These
Sisters (In Stereo) SB
Handmade
Gourmet
Our Home (In Stereo)
Living
Ingredient
Supermkt
Debt
Movie: ★* “Donor" (1990) Melissa Gilbert-Brinkman.
Commish (In Stereo) ffl |
NICK
Looney
Rugrats 33
LittfeBear |BlueClue
Busy World
Muppets
Allegra
Gullah
Little Bear
BlueClue
Rupert
Beaver
Tiny Toon
Looney
Nick in the Afternoon
SCIFI
Transfrmrs
In Space
Lost in Space
Voyage to Bottom of Sea
DarkShad
DarkShad
Ripley’s Believe It or Not
Mysteries
Monsters
Gallery
Beyond
Incredible Hulk
Land of the Giants
TBS
Gilligan
Bewitched
Little House
3’s Co.
Mama
Griffith
Griffith
Matlock “The Genius” ®
Major League Baseball: Los Angeles Dodgers at Atlanta Braves. (Live) ffi
Looney
Brady
TLC
David
Madison
Little Star
Rory
Pappyland
David
Critters
Iris the Prof.
Carlo | Kitchen
Homeworks
Home
DreamLiv ]Greatlnns [Wedding |Wedding
Gardening
Hometime
TNT
Scooby Dooby Doo
Flintstones
Flintstones
Gilligan
Gilligan
Spenser: For Hire
Outer Limits
Twilight Z.
Twilight Z.
Movie: ★*★ “Breaking Point" (1989) Corbin Bernsen.
Movie: “Arizona Raiders" \
USA
Mighty Max
Sailor Moon
Facts-Life
Facts-Life
Major Dad
Major Dad
Wings ®
Wings ®
Movie: ★* “The Disappearance of Christina" (1993) ffl
Movie: “Amazing Stories: The Movie 1/" (1992) ffi
Big Date
Big Date
DISN
Chip-Dale
Mermaid
Pooh
Katie-Orbie
Mickey
Wonderland
GummiBr
Madeline ®
Mermaid |Pooh
Ducktales | Donald
Movie: ** “Spring Fling!" (1995) ffl | C. Brown
Tale Spin ffl
Ducktales
HBO
Movie: "In the Line of Duty: Mob Justice"
Movie: **Vi2 "Sidekicks" (1993) Chuck Norris. 'PG' SB
Movie: ** “Bushwhacked" (1995) 'PG'
Movie: ** “Last of the Dogmen" (1995) 'PG' ffi | African-American Athlete
African-American Athlete |
MAX
(7:00) Movie
Movie: '★** "Lucas" (1986) Corey Haim. ‘PG-13’ SB
Movie: “The Young Don’t Cry" (1957)
Movie: ** "The Tingler” (1959, Horror) |Movie: ** “Three Wishes" (1995) Patrick Swayze. ® |Movie: *★’/2 “First Knight" (1995) ®
PASS
Pennant
Reverse | Bodies
Training |Training
Bodies |Body |Training
Tennis: ATP Legg Mason Washington Classic - Final. |Fame |Motorcycle Racing: Superbikes |Motorcycle Racing
SHO
Movie: *★ "Mommie Dearest” (1981, Drama) Faye Dunaway. ‘PG’
Movie: * “The Shrimp on the Barbie"
Movie: *** “Crusoe" (1988) 'PG-13' |Movie: ★** “Dominick and Eugene" (1988) 'PG-13' ® |Movie: **V2 “Foreign Body” (1986)
TMC
Movie: ★** “Death Becomes Her" (1992) ‘PG-13’ SB | Movie: ★★★* “A Man for All Seasons" (1966) ‘G’
Movie: “On a Clear Day You Can See Forever" (1970) | Movie: ** “The Ice Runner" (1993) Edward Albert. ‘R’ | “The French Connection"
| MONDAY EVENING JULY 21,1997 |
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
©
FOX
News
News
Cheers (In
Stereo) SB
Access
Hollywood
Extra (In
Stereo) ®
When Animals Attack II
(R) (In Stereo) (PA) ®
Roar “The Projector” (In
Stereo)®
News
Cheers (Part
1 of 2) ffi
M*A*S*H
(Part 1 of 2)
Who’s the
Boss? ffl
Cosby
Show®
Dating
Game
Newlywed
Game
o
NBC
News
News
NBC Nightly
News®
Wheel of
Fortune ®
Jeopardy!
®
Suddenly
Susan ®
Fired Up (In
Stereo) ®
Caroline in
the City ®
Wings (In
Stereo) ®
Dateline (In Stereo) ffi
News
Tonight Show (In Stereo)
ffl
Jenny Jones Conservative
make-overs. (In Stereo) ffi
Paid
Program
o
ABC
News
News
ABC Wld
News
Ent. Tonight
World of Discovery:
“Tiger: Lord of the Wild” ®
Movie: "Telling Secrets" (1993, Mystery) Detective
Jensen trails murderous Faith across the globe, ffi
News
Nightline ffi
Inside
Edition ffi
American
Journal ffi
Politically
Incorrect ffi
Matlock
“Brennan"
o
CBC
Great Parks
News SB
CBC News
On the
Road Again
Wayne &
Shuster
Just for
Laughs ®
Comics! (R)
®
Father Ted
22 Minutes
National/CBC News ffi
News ffi
Comics! (R)
ffi
The Bill
Sabu
(Off Air)
©
WB
Full House
(In Stereo)
Family
Matters SB
Doogie
Howser
Different
World ®
Cops (In
Stereo) ®
LAPD: Life
on the Beat
7th Heaven “Faith, Hope
and the Bottom Line" ®
Buffy the Vampire Slayer
“The Puppet Show” (R) ®
Mama’s
Family
Mama’s
Family
Highway
Patrol
Judge Judy
(In Stereo)
Strange
Universe
Psychic
Friends
Home
Videos
Movie: ★★
“Babe Ruth"
@D
UPN
Fresh
Prince
Mr. Cooper
Simpsons
(In Stereo)
Martin (In
Stereo) ®
To Be Announced
News
Fresh
Prince
Married...
With
Star Trek: The Next
Generation (In Stereo) ffl
Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine (In Stereo) ffl
©
PBS
Kratts’
Creatures
Science
Guy
Newshour With Jim
Lehrer SB
Business
Report
MotorWeek
(In Stereo)
Evening at Pops (Irr
Stereo)
Rock & Roll
Technicolor”
‘Blues in
In Stereo) ®
Rock & Roll “The Wild
Side" (In Stereo) ffi
Being
Served
Royal-Air
Farce
Evening at Pops (In
Stereo)
Rock & Roll “Blues in
Technicolor” (In Stereo) ffi
©
CBS
Mad About
You SB
Mad About
You SB
Seinfeld (In
Stereo) SB
CBS News
Hard Copy
®
Rescue 911
(In Stereo)
Cosby (In
Stereo) ®
Everybody-
Raymond
Cybill “The
Wedding” ®
Murphy
Brown ffi
Chicago Hope "Verdicts”
(R) (In Stereo) ffi
Late Show (In Stereo) ffl
In Depth
Detroit (R)
Late Late Show Comic
Andy Richter. (In Stereo)
HardCopy I
ffi
A&E
New Mike Hammer “Body
Shot"
Quincy “Dying for a Drink”
Law & Order “Discord" ®
Biography “Tanya Tucker:
Country Rebel"
Poirot “The Cornish
Mystery”
Miss Marple “A Pocketful
of Rye" (Part 2 of 2)
Law & Order “Right to
Counsel” ffl
Biography “Tanya Tucker:
Country Rebel” (R) 1
Poirot “The Cornish
Mystery” j
AMC
Movie: **** "Going My Way" (1944, Drama) Bing Crosby, Barry
Fitzgerald. A new priest breathes new life into a debt-ridden parish. I®
Movie: t'/i “The Deers/ayer" (1957,
Adventure) Lex Barker, Rita Moreno.
Movie: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" (1966)
A professor and his wife host an all-night drinking party.
Movie: ★★ “Night Riders"
(1939) John Wayne.
Movie: ★★★★ “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" (1966) 1
A professor and his wife host an all-night drinking party. 1
BET
(4:00) Rap City
Benson
Hit List
Planet Groove
Comicview
Talk jBenson
Rap City
DISC
Travelers “Old West Days:
Jackson Hole, Wyoming”
Movie
Magic (R)
Beyond
2000
Strange Planes Rear-
driven propellers. (R)
Wild Discovery "Animal
I.Q. -- Naturally Clever”
Loch Ness Discovered
W
What If: “California
Earthquake" (R)
Wild Discovery “Animal
I.Q. -- Naturally Clever” (R)
Loch Ness Discovered
(A)
What If: “California
Earthquake” (R)
ESPN
NFL’s
Greatest
NBA Inside
Stuff
Up Close
Sportscenter
NFL Prime
Monday
Strongest
Man
WNBA Basketball: Phoenix Mercury at Sacramento
Monarchs. From ARCO Arena. (Live)
Baseball
Tonight
Sportscenter ffl
Baseball
Tonight
Tour De
France
Cheerleading: College
Cheer/Dance
FAM
Highway to h
Squeaky Whe
leaven “The
el" SB
Carol
Burnett
Carol
Burnett
Waltons A backwoodsman
kidnaps Elizabeth.
Rescue 911 (In Stereo)®
Hawaii Five-0 “Beautiful
Screamer”
700 Club
Three Stooges
Carson
Classics
Carson
Classics
Paid
Program
Paid
| Program
LIFE
Golden
Girls SB
Golden
Girls SB
Supermar
ket Sweep
Debt
Intimate Portrait “Marla
Maples Trump" (In Stereo)
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Movie: “Justice in a Small Town" (1994) Kate Jackson.
A civil service worker in Georgia exposes corruption.
Homicide: Life on the
Street “See No Evil” ffl
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Sisters “The Things We
Do for Love” (In Stereo) ffi I
NICK
You Afraid?
Rocko’s
Modern Life
Clarissa
Explains
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Doug (In
Stereo) ®
Rugrats (In
Stereo) ®
Hey Arnold!
(In Stereo)
Monkees
Monkees
Monkees
Monkees
Monkees
Monkees
Newhart
(Parti of 2).
Odd Couple
ffl
Taxi (Part 1
of 2) ffl
Mary Tyler
Moore ffi
Dick Van
| Dyke
SCIFI
Six Million D
ollar Man
Making
Darkside
Amazing
Genesis
Seaquest DSV ®
Movie: **V4 “The Fly II" (1989) Eric Stoltz.
Amazing
Genesis
Seaquest DSV ffi
Movie: “The Fly II (1989) 1
TBS
Home
Videos
Home
Videos
Saved by
the Bell SB
Saved by
the Bell ®
Family
Matters ®
Family
Matters ®
Movie: **V2 "Poison Ivy" (1992) Drew Barrymore. A
teen-age temptress disrupts a wealthy household.
Movie: ★★ "Summer Girl" (1983) Barry Bostwick.
Expectant parents come to regret hiring a live-in sitter.
Movie: ** “Terror at London Bridge" (1985, Suspense)!
Jack the Ripper resurfaces in modern-day Arizona.
TLC
Homebods
Home Pro
Furniture
Renovation
Hometime
Hometime
Extreme Machines (R) |Ancient Prophecies One
Put to the Test | Extreme Machines (R)
Ancient Prophecies One [ Put to the Test (R)
TNT
(4:00) Movie:
Raiders” (196
★* “Arizona
5, Western)
In the Heat of the Night
(In Stereo) SB
Kung Fu: The Legend
Continues
Movie: “Rough Riders" (1997) Tom Berenger. The
story of Theodore Roosevelt’s famous cavalry group. ®
Movie: "Rough Riders" (1997) Tom Berenger. The
story of Theodore Roosevelt's famous cavalry group, ffi
Movie: “Rough Riders" (1997) Tom Berer
story of Theodore Roosevelt’s famous cav
iger. The
airy group.
USA
Wings (In
Stereo) SB
Wings (In
Stereo) SB
Renegade “Stationary
Target” (In Stereo) SB
Highlander: The Series
“Line of Fire” (In Stereo) ®
World Wrestling Federation Monday Night Raw (In
Stereo)
La Femme Nikita
“Innocent" (In Stereo) ffi
Silk Stalking
(R) (In Stereo
s "S.O.B.”
)ffl
Renegade “Studs” (In
i Stereo) ffl
C-Net
Central
Reel Wild
Cinema (R)
DISN
Chip ’n’
Dale
Goof Troop
SB
Flash
Forward SB
Torkelsons
(In Stereo)
Movie: 2 “The Brave Little Toaster"
(1987) Voices of Jon Lovitz. ‘NR’ ®
Movie: “Susie Q” (1996, Fantasy) Justin
Whalin, Shelley Long. (In Stereo) ‘PG’ ®
Movie: ★★ "Spring Fling!" (1995,
Comedy) James Eckhouse. ffi
Movie: ★★ “Where Angels Go, Trouble Follows" (1968,
Comedy) Rosalind Russell, Stella Stevens. 'G'
“Pirates of
Penz.”
HBO
Movie: *'/2 “
//” (1992, Adv
American Sha
enture) Reese
olin: King of the Kickboxers
Madigan. 'PG-13'
Movie: 2 “Sidekicks” (1993) Chuck Norris. A young
misfit imagines he is a movie hero's partner. ‘PG’ ®
Movie: ★★★ “Bad Boys" (1995) Martin Lawrence. Two
Miami cops attempt to recover stolen police evidence.
Oz “God’s Chillin’’ (In
Stereo) ffi
Arliss (In
Stereo)®
Perversions
of Science
Comedy
Half-Hour
★★ “Breach
of Trust" 'R'
MAX
(3:30) Movie
Movie: **’/2 "Chapter Two" (1979, Comedy) James Caan, Marsha
Mason. A recent widower and a divorcee reluctantly fall in love. ‘PG’
Movie: ** "Boomerang" (1992) Eddie Murphy. A
sexist marketing exec gets his comeuppance. ‘R’ ®
Movie: **'/ 2 “A Boy Called Hate" (1995,
Drama) Scott Caan. (In Stereo) ‘R’ ffi
Movie: *** “Primal Fear" (1996, Suspense) Richard Gere. A hotshot 1
attorney defends an altar boy accused of murder. (In Stereo) ‘R’ ffi
PASS
Horseworld
I Locker Rm I Game Niqht I Major League Baseball: Chicago White Sox at Detroit Tigers. From Tiger Stadium.
T ransworld Sport | Planet X
Trackside |Major League Baseball: White Sox at Tigers
SHO
(3:45) Movie
[Movie: *■* “Mommie Dearest"(1981, Drama) Faye Dunaway, Steve
Forrest. A daughter’s view of screen star Joan Crawford's life. ‘PG’
[Movie: ** “The Courtyard"(1995,
Suspense) Andrew McCarthy. ‘R’
[Movie: * "Bullet" (1997) Mickey Rourke. A released
Icriminal clashes with a Brooklyn gang leader. ‘R’ ffi
Movie: **'/2 "Johnny Handsome" (1989,
|Drama) Mickey Rourke. (In Stereo) 'R'
[Movie: “White Tiger 1
1(1996) Gary Daniels.‘R’ )
TMC
(4:00) Movie
Movie: *V4 “Triplecross" (1995) Patrick Bergin. An FBI
agent relentlessly pursues two crafty con artists. ‘R’ SB
Movie: **V2 “High Spirits" (1988,
Comedy) Peter O’Toole. 'PG-13'
Movie: **★ “Death Becomes Her"
(1992, Comedy) Meryl Streep. 'PG-13' ®
Movie: ** "Boca" (1994) Rae Dawn Chong. A reporter
investigates the murders of several street kids. ‘R’ ffi
Movie: ★★ "Gnaw: Food of the Gods II" 1
(1989, Science Fiction) Paul Coufos. ‘R’ |
k : , I
LOCAL 698
BEST WISHES AND
HOPE FOR THE END OF
THIS STRUGGLE
PETERAI6UO
RESIDENT
SANDRA KJ
ZIMMERMJ
cretary/Tn
Boilermakers Local #169
Supports the
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Detroit Newspaper
Workers.
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WARNING.
| If you or someone you care about has been INJURED in an AUTO ACCIDENT You’re an |
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I concerning your legal rights! CALL TOLL FREE: 1-800-545-0505
5 J. SCHALJE^J


TUESDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON
JULY 22,1997
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 I 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
FOX
0
Eyewitness Morning
Fox After Breakfast [
Crook & Chase (In Stereo)
Extra SB | Hollywood
News Real TV ffl Geraldo Rivera (R)
Dating | Newlywed
Ricki Lake (R)
Rosie O'Donnell (R) [
NBC
(7:00) Today (In Stereo) [
Maury SB
Jerry Springer
Jenny Jones (In Stereo)
News
Jeopardy!
Days of Our Lives [
Another World ffl
Sally
Montel Williams ffl
ABC
Good Morning America
Regis & Kathie
Maureen 0’Boyle
Rolonda (R)
News
Pt. Charles
All My Children [
One Life to Live I
General Hospital
Oprah Winfrey
CBC
O
(7:00) CBC Morning News
Playground |SesamePk
Theodore |Mr. Dressup
Wimzie | Lead [
Midday SB
Encore to Pamela Wallin
E.N.G “Double Vision" I
Coronation
Urban P.
Jonovision
The Bill
WB
©
Gargoyles JonQuest
In the Heat of the Night
Bobby I Dinosaurs"
Medicine Woman
700 Club (Left in Progress)
Beverly Hills, 90210 ffl
Baywatch i
Sobakawa Bananas
Garfield
Quack Pack
BugsDaffy
Animaniacs
UPN
©
Mask
Menace
Blossom SB Step-Step
Sunset Beach ffl
Storytime | Reading
Jeffersons
All-Family
Sanford Good Times
King Arthur
Aladdin ffl
Batman
Eekistravag
Beetleborgs
Twist
PBS
m.
Tots TV [
Station
Sesame Street (In Stereo)
Barney
Mr Rogers
Lamb Chop
Puzzle
Sesame Street (In Stereo)
Barney
Couch
Arthur I
Magic Bus
C. Sandiego
Wishbone
CBS
©
(7:00) This Morning [
Rockford Files
Guiding Light (In Stereo)
Price Is Right [
WKRP
Young and the Restless I Bold & B.
As the World Turns I
Gordon Elliott (R)
Murphy
Designing
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
McMillan and Wife | Banacek "Rocket to Oblivion”
New Mike Hammer | Quincy “Science for Sale” | Law & Order “Manhood” | McMillan and Wife
Banacek “Rocket to Oblivion”
AMC
(7:00) Movie: "Another"
Movie: ★★★'/2 “The Little Foxes” (1941) Bette Davis.
Movie: ★★Vi “I've Lived Before" (1956) | “'Neath the Arizona Skies" |Movie: ★★★ “Love Letters" (1945) Jennifer Jones.
Movie: “The Four Feathers" (1939)
BET
John A. Cherry
Benson
Hit List
Video Vibrations
Planet Groove
I Rap City
DISC
Paid Prog. | Paid Prog.
Cuisine
| Graham K.
Home Matters (R)
Housesmart! (R)
Start | Interior Mot.
I Home Matters (R)
Housesmart! (R)
llnterior Mot. Istart
Great Chefs
Great Chefs
ESPN
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Golf: Wonderful World of Golf. (R) | Running
Golf: Dayton’s Challenge.
NFL Great
FAM
Father Dowling Mysteries
Waltons “The Torch”
|700 Club | FitTV
Rescue 911 (In Stereo) SB
Home & Family (In Stereo)
ShopDrop I Shopping
I Animal
Animal
LIFE
Baby
Kids These
Sisters (In Stereo) SB
Handmade
Gourmet
| Our Home (In Stereo)
Living
Ingredient
Supermkt
Debt
[Movie: ★★ “Midnight’s Child"{1992) Olivia d’Abo. SB
Commishffl
NICK
Looney
Rugrats SB
Little Bear |BlueClue
Busy World
Muppets
Allegra
Gullah
Little Bear
BlueClue
Rupert
Beaver
Tiny Toon
Looney
| Nick in the Afternoon
SCIFI
Transfrmrs
In Space
Lost in Space
| Voyage to Bottom of Sea
DarkShad
DarkShad
Ripley’s Believe It or Not
Mysteries
Monsters
Gallery
Beyond .
Incredible Hulk
I Land of the Giants
TBS
Gilligan
Bewitched
Little House
3’s Co.
Mama
Griffith
Griffith
Matlock “The Magician” SB
I Major League Baseball: Atlanta Braves at Chicago Cubs. (Live) SB
Filler
Baseball
TLC
David
Madison
Little Star
Rory
Pappyland
David
Critters
Iris the Prof.
Carlo | Kitchen
Homeworks
Home
DreamLiv | Great Inns | Wedding | Wedding
Gardening
Hometime
TNT
Scooby Dooby Doo
Flintstones
Flintstones
Gilligan
Gilligan
| Spenser: For Hire
Outer Limits
Twilight Z.
Twilight Z.
Nightmare Years (R) (In Stereo) (Part 1 of 4) SB
[Movie: ★★ “The Texican"\
USA
Mighty Max
Sailor Moon
Facts-Life
Facts-Life
Major Dad
Major Dad
Wings SB
Wings SB
Movie: ★★Vi "Linda"(1993) Virginia Madsen. SB
Movie: ★★★ “Amazing Stories: The Movie VI”(1992)
Big Date
Big Date
DISN
Chip-Dale
Mermaid
Pooh
Katie-Orbie
Mickey
Wonderland
GummiBr
Madeline SB
Mermaid |Pooh j Ducktales | Donald
Movie: "The Purple People Eater" (1988)
C. Brown
Tale Spin SB
Ducktales I
HBO
(6:45) Movie
Movie: ★★V2 "High Spirits” (1988) SB
Movie: ★★★ “The Truth About Cats and Dogs" (1996)
Movie: ★★ “Chain Reaction" (1996) Keanu Reeves. SB
Movie: “Brain Smasher... A Love Story"
Movie: ★★★ “Soul of the Game" (1996) 1
MAX
(7:00) Movie
Movie: ★★★ “The Command” (1954) SB
Movie: ★★Vi “Never Too Late"[1996) 'PG'
"House on Haunted Hill” SB | “Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown!" ‘G’ |Movie: ★★Vi “Sy/vesfer”(1985) ‘PG’ SB
★★’/2 “Grumpier Old Men" I
PASS
Pro Beach Soccer (R) | Bodies
|Training
Body | Bodies jTraining
Training
In Their Prime: Montell Griffin vs. Roy Jones Jr.. (R) ILPBT Bowling: Summer Tour. I Reverse
Speed
Sea TV (R) 1
SHO
(7:45) Movie: “Things Change" (1988)
Movie: ★★★Vi "Julia"(1977, Drama) Jane Fonda. 'PG'
iMovie: ★★V2 “A/ever Too Late" (1996) I Movie: ★★★ “Fraternity Row" (1977) Peter Fox. ‘PG’ iMovie: "The Comedy of Terrors" (1964) I
"Duchess" I
TMC
(6:50) Movie |Movie: ★★★ "A Pure Formality"(1994, Drama) ‘PG-13’ |Movie: ★★Vi “Heck's Way Home" {1995) |Movie: ★’/2 “Summer Camp" (1994) 'PG' |Movie: ★★'/2 "Punchline" {1988) Sally Field. ‘R’ SB |Movie: ★★Vi "Funeral in Berlin" (1967) |
TUESDAY EVENING JULY 22,1997 |
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
0
FOX
News
News
Cheers (In
Stereo) ®
Access
Hollywood
Extra (In
Stereo) ®
Movie: ★★ "The Chase" (1994) Charlie Sheen. An
escaped con and his obliging hostage head for Mexico.
News
Cheers (Part
2 of 2) ®
M*A*S‘H®
Who’s the
Boss? ®
Cosby
Show®
Dating
Game
Newlywed
Game
O
NBC
News
News
NBC Nightly
News ®
Wheel of
Fortune ®
Jeopardy!
®
Mad About
You (R) ®
Naked Truth
(In Stereo)
Frasier (In
Stereo)®
Caroline in
the City ®
Dateline (In Stereo) ®
News
Tonight Show (In Stereo)
®
Jenny Jones Early
physical developers. ®
Paid
Program
o
ABC
News
News
ABC Wld
News
Ent. Tonight
Roseanne
(In Stereo)
Life’s Work
"Boss" ®
Home
Improve.
Spin City (In
Stereo) ®
NYPD Blue “My Wild Irish
Nose” (In Stereo) (PA) ®
News
Detroit: July
1967
Nightline ®
Inside
Edition ®
I American
Journal ffl
Politically
Incorrect ffl
o
CBC
Gilmour on
the Arts
News ®
CBC News
On the
Road Again
Health
Show (R) ®
Market
Place (R) ®
Venture (R)
®
Witness “Rape: A Crime
of War” (R) ®
National/CBC News ®
News ®
Comics! (R)
®
The Bill
“Bedfellows"
Movie: ★★★ "Elephant Boy” (1937) An 1
Indian native befriends a rogue elephant. 1
0D
WB
Full House
(In Stereo)
Family
Matters ®
Doogie
Howser
Different
World ®
Cops (In
Stereo) ®
LAPD: Life
on the Beat
Movie: ★★★★ “Driving Miss Daisy" (1989) An elderly
widow becomes friends with her black chauffeur.
Mama’s Mama’s
Family Family
Highway
Patrol
Judge Judy
(In Stereo)
Strange
Universe
Paid
Program
Home
Videos
★★ “Spaced 1
Invaders"
0D
UPN
Fresh
Prince
Mr. Cooper
Simpsons
(In Stereo)
Martin (In
Stereo)®
Home
Improve.
Home
Improve.
Moesha(ln |
Stereo)®
Social
Studies®
[Malcolm &
Eddie (R) ®
In the
House®
News
Fresh
Prince
Married...
With
Star Trek: The Next
Generation (In Stereo) ®
Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine (In Stereo) ffl
©
PBS
Kratts’
Creatures
Science
Guy
Newshour With Jim
Lehrer ®
Business
Report
Back to
Back
Nova “Rafting Through the
Grand Canyon" (In Stereo)
Grand Canyon Flood! (In
Stereo) ®
P.O.V. (In Stereo) ®
Being
Served
Chef!
Nova “Rafting Through the
Grand Canyon" (In Stereo)
Grand Canyon Flood! (In
Stereo) ffl
©
CBS
Mad About
You®
Mad About
You SB
Seinfeld
“The Deal"
CBS News
Hard Copy
®
Rescue 911
(In Stereo)
Promised Land “The
Collapse” (In Stereo) ®
Movie: “Scattered Dreams: The Kathryn Messenger
Story" (1993, Drama) Tyne Daly. (In Stereo) ®
Late Show Actor Richard
Kind, musician John Hiatt.
Hard Copy
ffl
Late Late Show Bill
Maher, Doug E. Doug, ffl
Gordon
Elliott (R)
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
New Mike Hammer “Little
Miss Murder"
Quincy “Science for Sale”
Law & Order “Manhood”
ffl
Biography: Jamie Lee
Curtis-Girl Next Door
Movie: “Dalziel and Pascoe: Ruling Passion"(1997) A
visit to old friends uncovers a case of multiple murder.
Law & Order “Point of
View" ffl
Biography: Jamie Lee
Curtis-Girl Next Door
Movie: “Dalziel and
Pascoe: Ruling Passion"
AMC
(3:30) Movie
Movie: ★★Vi “The Golden Blade" {1953,
Adventure) Rock Hudson, Piper Laurie.
Movie: ★★★ “Thunder Bay" (1953, Adventure) Trouble
erupts between shrimp fishermen and oil riggers.
Movie: ★★★★ “Notorious" {1946,
Suspense) Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman.
Movie: ★★★ “The Bad Seed” {1956, Suspense) Nancy Kelly, Henry
Jones. A mother suspects her child’s evil behavior is inherited, ffl
King of Jungleland
BET
(4:00) Rap City
Benson
Hit List
Planet Groove
Comicview
Talk | Benson
Rap City
DISC
Travelers “Dia de San
Juan: Asuncion, Paraguay"
Movie
Magic (R)
Beyond
2000
Modern Combat Aircraft
(R)
Wild Discovery “Animal
I.Q. -- Socially Smart”
New Detectives "Mind
Hunters" (R)
Arsenal (R) (Part 2 of 3)
Wild Discovery "Animal
I.Q. -- Socially Smart” (R)
New Detectives “Mind
Hunters" (R)
Arsenal (R) (Part 2 of 3)
ESPN
NFL’s
Greatest
NBA Today
Special
Up Close
Sportscenter
Outside the Lines
Strongest
Man
Golf: Wonderful World of Golf.
Baseball
Tonight
Sportscenter ffl
Baseball
Tonight
Summer Sizzle
FAM
Highway to Heaven “It’s a
Dog's Life” (In Stereo) ffl
Carol
Burnett
Carol
Burnett
Waltons "The Revel”
Rescue 911 (In Stereo) ffl
Hawaii Five-0 “The Last
Eden"
700 Club
Three Stooges
Carson
Classics
Carson
Classics
Paid
Program
Paid
Program
LIFE
Golden
Girls ffl
Golden
Girls ffl
Supermar
ket Sweep
Debt
Intimate Portrait “Gloria
Estefan” (R) (In Stereo) ffl
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Movie: “Lady Killer" (1995, Suspense) Judith Light. The
object of a woman's brief affair returns to haunt her.
Homicide: Life on the
Street “Black and Blue” ffl
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Sisters “Broken Angel" (In
Stereo) ffl
NICK
You Afraid?
Rocko’s
Modern Life
Clarissa
Explains
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Doug (In
Stereo) ffl
Rugrats (In
Stereo) ffl
Secret-of
Alex
1 Love Lucy
ffl
1 Love Lucy 1 Love Lucy
ffl ffl
1 Love Lucy
ffl
1 Love Lucy
ffl
1 Love Lucy
ffl
Newhart
(Part 2 of 2)
Odd Couple
"The Frog”
Taxi (Part 2
of 2) ffl
Mary Tyler
Moore ffl
Dick Van
Dyke
SCIFI
Six Million Dollar Man
Twilight Z.
Darkside
Amazing
Sci-Fi Buzz
Seaquest DSV (In Stereo)
Movie: ★★ , /2 "Phase IV" (1974) Nigel Davenport.
Amazing
Sci-Fi Buzz
Seaquest DSV (In Stereo)
Movie: “Phase IV” (1974)
TBS
(4:20) Major League Baseball: Atlanta Braves at Chicago Cubs.
From Wrigley Field. (Live) ffl
Family
Matters ffl
Movie: ★ "Maximum Overdrive" (1986) Emilio Estevez.
A comet’s tail gives inanimate objects a violent life.
Movie: ★★ "Summer School" (1987, Comedy) A high-
school gym instructor tries to sweat out the summer.
Movie: ★ “Maximum Overdrive" (1986) Emilio Estevez.
A comet's tail gives inanimate objects a violent life.
TLC
Homebods | Home Pro
Furniture | Renovation
Hometime
Hometime
MedDetect |Trauma-ER |Ancient Prophecies One
Put to the Test
MedDetect |Trauma-ER
Ancient Prophecies One
Put to the Test (R)
TNT
(4:00) Movie: ★★ “The
Texican"{1966, Western)
In the Heat of the Night
“The Creek" (In Stereo) ffl
Kung Fu: The Legend
Continues “The Promise"
WCW Tuesday Nitro (In StereoLive) ffl
New Adventures of Robin
Hood “The Legion" ffl
WCW Tuesday Nitro (R) (In Stereo) ffl
Movie: ★★Vi "Streets of
Fire" (1984) Michael Pare.
USA
Wings (In
Stereo) ffl
Wings (In
Stereo) ffl
Renegade “Offshore
Thunder" (In Stereo) ffl
Highlander: The Series
"The Revolutionary" ffl
Murder, She Wrote
“Always a Thief" ffl
Movie: ★★★★ “The Godfather” (1972) Marlon Brando.
A Mafia patriarch tries to hold his empire together.
Silk Stalkings “In the
Name of Love” (In Stereo)
Renegade “The Road Not
Taken" (In Stereo) ffl
Magnum, P.l. “Going
Home” ffl
DISN
Chip ’n’
Dale
Goof Troop
ffl
Flash
Forward ffl
Torkelsons
(In Stereo)
Movie: ★★Vi “The Worst
Witch" (1986) Diana Rigg.
Movie: "Double, Double, Toil and Trouble" 1993) Twins
and friends attempt to outsmart an evil witch, ffl
Movie: "Escape to Witch Mountain"
(1995, Adventure) Erik von Detten. ffl
Movie: ★★V2 “The North Avenue
Irregulars" {1979) Edward Herrmann. ‘G’
Movie: ★★★ “Niagara"
(1953) Marilyn Monroe.
HBO
Movie: ★Vi "Date With an Angel" (1987) A disabled
angel disrupts the life of an aspiring composer. 'PG'
Movie: ★★ "Spies Like L/s” (1985) Dan Aykroyd. Two
inept government workers enter a spy training program.
Movie: ★★ "Chain Reaction" (1996) A scientist and a
machinist become caught in a conspiracy. ‘PG-13’ ffl
Arliss (In
Stereo) ffl
Spicy City
(In Stereo)
Event: 1st
Look
Movie: ★★★ “Copycat" (1995,
Suspense) Sigourney Weaver. ‘R’ ffl
MAX
(4:15) Movie: "Grumpier
Old Men" (1995) ‘PG-13’
Movie: ★★'/2 “Used People" (1992) A Jewish widow
falls for her late husband's Italian friend. ‘PG-13’ ffl
Movie: ★★★ “Twister" (1996) Helen Hunt. Storm
chasers race to test a new tornado-monitoring device.
Movie: ★★ “Love and a.45" (1994,
Drama) Gil Bellows. (In Stereo) ‘R’ ffl
Movie: ★Vi “Under Siege 2: Dark Territory” (1995) A
former CIA agent battles terrorists on a hijacked train.
"Howling II...
Werewolf"
PASS
Races-Hazel Park
Fame jGame Night | Major League Baseball: Chicago White Sox at Detroit Tigers. From Tiger Stadium.
Sports Writers on TV | Reverse
Trackside
Major League Baseball: White Sox at Tigers
SHO
(4:25) Movie: “Duchess &
Dirtwater Fox"
Movie: ★★★Vi “Things Change" (1988) Don Ameche.
An Italian immigrant is mistaken for a mob kingpin. ‘PG’
Movie: ★★★Vi “Body Heat" (1981, Suspense) A lawyer
is persuaded by his lover to murder her husband. ‘R’ ffl
Movie: "Moving Target" {1996, Drama)
Michael Dudikoff. (In Stereo) 'R'
Women-
Passion
Beverly
Hills
Movie: ★'/2 “Barb Wire"(1996,
Adventure) Pamela Anderson Lee. ‘R’ ffl
TMC
(3:45) Movie
Movie: ★% “Sahara" (1995, Drama) James Belushi. A
stranded tank unit prepares for incoming Nazi troops.
Movie: ★★ "Dangerous Minds” (1995,
Drama) Michelle Pfeiffer. ‘R’ ffl
Movie: ★★ “Blood In... Blood Out: Bound by Honor" (1993, Drama) Damian Chapa.
Two siblings and a cousin fall on both sides of the law. (In Stereo) ‘R’ ffl
Movie: ★★’/2 “Tiger Heart" (1996,
Adventure) T.J. Roberts. ‘PG-13’ ffl
“The Limbic
Region"
SOLIDARITY^
Machinists Air Transport District 143 supports the
efforts of the workers at the Detroit News & Detroit
live Press to win a fair and equitable contract.
U.A.W. LOCAL 160
MEMBERSHIP, LEADERSHIP AND
RETIREE CHAPTER WILL
CONTINUE TO SUPPORT THE
NEWSPAPER WORKERS IN THEIR,
STRUGGLE THROUGH ACTION
AND $$$ UNTIL IUSTICE I§ SERVED!"
SHIP AND
IN SOLIDARITY • UNITED WE STAND
in the public service
LOCAL 1815
Warren Consolidated Schools
Support the Newspaper Workers in their fight
V for their rights to dignity and justice. a


WEDNESDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON
JULY 23,1997
8:00
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
FOX
o
Eyewitness Morning
Fox After Breakfast!
Crook & Chase (In Stereo)
Extra SB | Hollywood
News Real TV SB Geraldo Rivera (R)
Dating | Newlywed
Ricki Lake I
Rosie O'Donnell (R) I
NBC
(7:00) Today (In Stereo) I
Maury SB
Jerry Springer
Jenny Jones (In Stereo)
News
Jeopardy!
Days of Our Lives [
Another World I
Sally
Montel Williams ffl
ABC
O
Good Morning America
Regis & Kathie
Maureen O’Boyle
Rolonda (R)
News
Pt. Charles
All My Children SB
One Life to Live (
General Hospital I
Oprah Winfrey SB
CBC
O
(7:00) CBC Morning News
Playground |SesamePlT
Theodore [Mr. Dressup
Wimzie
Lead!
Midday 1]
Encore to Pamela Wallin
E.N.G “Best Defense” I
Coronation Urban P.
Jonovision
The Bill
WB
©
Gargoyles JonQuest
In the Heat of the Night
Medicine Woman
700 Club (Left in Progress)
Beverly Hills, 90210
Baywatch “Aftershock" [
Fitness
Bananas
Garfield
Quack Pack
BugsDaffy
Animaniacs
UPN
©
Mask
Menace
Bobby | Dinosaurs"
Blossom SB Step-Step
Sunset Beach I
Jeffersons
All-Family
Sanford Good Times
King Arthur
Aladdin SB
Batman
Eekistravag
Beetleborgs
Twist
PBS
©
Tots TV [
Station
Sesame Street (In Stereo)
Barney
Mr Rogers
Storytime | Reading
Lamb Chop
Puzzle
Sesame Street (In Stereo)
Barney
Couch
Arthur [
Magic Bus
C. Sandiego
Wishbone
CBS
©
(7:00) This Morning I
Rockford Files
Guiding Light (In Stereo)
Price Is Right I
WKRP
Young and the Restless I Bold & B.
As the World Turns [IB
Gordon Elliott (R)
Murphy
Designing
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
McCloud “This Must Be the Alamo”
|Cosby Mysteries [New Mike Hammer |Quincy “Sleeping Dogs" [Law & Order [
| McCloud “This Must Be the Alamo"
| Cosby Mysteries
AMC
(7:30) Movie: “The Bad Seed" (1956)
Movie: ★★★ "The Emperor Waltz" ()9A8) Bing Crosby. |Movie: *** "Up in Arms" (1944, Musical) Danny Kaye. |Movie: “Tin Pan Alley" (1940) [Movie: "Notorious" (1946) Cary Grant.
BET
Facts
Popoff
Screen
Hit List
Video Vibrations
Planet Groove
Rap City
DISC
Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
Cuisine
Graham K. Home Matters (R)
Housesmarti (R)
Start [Interior MotT Home Matters
Housesmart! (R)
Interior Mot. Start
Great Chefs Great Chefs
ESPN
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Water Skiing
MtBiking [Surfing (R)
Horse
Racehorse
In. Skating
NFL Great
FAM
Father Dowling Mysteries
Waltons "The Tailspin”
700 Club
|FitTV
Rescue 911 (In Stereo)!
Home & Family (In Stereo)
ShopDrop [Shopping
Animal Animal
LIFE
Baby
Kids These
Sisters “All That Glitters"
Handmade
Gourmet
Our Home (In Stereo)
Living Ingredient
Supermkt Debt
"Tears and Laughter: The Joan and Melissa Rivers" Commish
NICK
Looney
Rugrats SB
Little Bear | BlueClue
Busy World Muppets
Allegra Gullah
Little Bear BlueClue
Rupert
Beaver
Tiny Toon Looney
Nick in the Afternoon
[Burger
SCIFI
Transfrmrs
In Space
Lost in Space
Voyage to Bottom of Sea
DarkShad
DarkShad
Ripley’s Believe It or Not Mysteries [Monsters
Gallery
Beyond
Incredible Hulk
| Land of the Giants
TBS
Gilligan
Bewitched
Little House
3's Co.
Mama
Griffith
Griffith
Movie: ★»’/2 “My Stepmother Is an Alien" {1988)
Major League Baseball: Atlanta Braves at Chicago Cubs. (Live)
TLC
David
Madison
Little Star
Rory
Pappyland
David
Critters
Iris the Prof.
Carlo | Kitchen Homeworks Home
DreamLiv |Greatlnns [Wedding |Wedding Gardening |Hometime
TNT
Scooby Dooby Poo
Flintstones
Flintstones
Gilligan
Gilligan
Spenser: For Hire
Outer Limits
Twilight Z. [Twilight Z.
Nightmare Years (R) (In Stereo) (Part 2 of 4) [
Movie: “The Quick Gun"
USA
Mighty Max Sailor Moon
Facts-Life
Facts-Life
Major Dad
Major Dad
Wings ffl
Wings [
Movie: -k-kVi "Dying to Remember" (1993, Suspense)
Movie: ★★ “Knight Rider 2000" (1991, Adventure) SB
Big Date Big Date
DISN
Chip-Pale
Mermaid
Pooh
Katie-Orbie Mickey
Wonderland
GummiBr
Madeline SB
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Movie: “The Rescuers Down Under" ‘G’ C. Brown
Tale Spin ffl
Ducktales
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Movie: ★ “Leonard Part 6" (1987) ‘PG’
Movie: ★★ “Going Under”(1991) ‘PG 1 ffl |Movie: “Playing Dangerous
"(1995) |Movie: “The Cable Guy"(1996) BE |Movie: ★★* "And the Band Played On” (1993) Matthew Modine.
“Walk-Clds"
MAX
Movie: "Without a Trace” (1983) Judd Hirsch.
Transworld Sport (R) |Bodies [Training Training Bodies |Body [Training
Movie: ★★★V2 "Hope and Glory" (1987) Sarah Miles.
Movie: ★★ “13 Ghosts" (1960, Horror) Movie: ★★★ “Sky Riders" (1976) ‘PG’ Movie: “Kissing Miranda” (1995) ‘NR’ “Playing2
PASS
Bowling: ABC World Team Challenge. Speed Motorsports Hour
Cycle World
Equestrian (R)
SHO
(7:00) Movie Movie: ★★★ "Eight Men Out" (1988) John Cusack. ‘PG’
Movie: -kVi “Bwana Devil" (1952)
Movie: “An Affair to Remember" (1957, Drama)
Movie:* "SuburbanCommando"(1991) |GoodBurg
Movie: "Three Women"
TMC
(6:55) Movie Movie: ★★★★ "It Happened One Night" (1934) [
Movie: ★★ “Fear” (1990) Ally Sheedy.
Movie: ★★★V'2 “Lady Sings the Blues" (1972) Diana Ross. ’R’ |Movie: "Survival Quest" (1989) ‘R’
Movie: “Midnight Edition"
WEDNESDAY EVENING
JULY 23,1997
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
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1:00
1:30 I
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Access
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World’s Funniest Kids
Outtakes (In Stereo) BB
Pacific Palisades “Sweet
Revenge" (In Stereo) BB
News
Cheers
“Rebound”
M*A‘S*H ®
Who’s the
Boss? ®
Cosby
Show®
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Game
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NBC
News
News
NBC Nightly
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Wheel of
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Jeopardy!
BB
Movie: “Lying Eyes" (1996, Suspense) Cassidy Rae. A
teen’s life is endangered after she ends a love affair. BB
Law & Order "Showtime"
(In Stereo) (Part 3 of 3) BE
News
Tonight Show Actor
Patrick Stewart. (In Stereo)
Jenny Jones Breast size
criticisms. (In Stereo) ®
Paid
Program
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ABC
News
News
ABC Wld
News
Ent. Tonight
Grace
Under Fire
Coach (In
Stereo) BB
[Drew Carey
(In Stereo)
Ellen (R) (In
Stereo)®
Primetime Live EE
News
Detroit: July
1967
Nightline ®
Inside
Edition ®
American
Journal ®
Matlock
“The Idol" ®
O
CBC
Schlesinger
SB
News BB
CBC News
On the
Road Again
Royal
Canadian
World of Discovery: “Blue
Whale: Giants of the Deep”
Black Harbour “Time and
Tide” (R) BB
National/CBC News EE
News®
Comics! (R)
®
The Bill
Movie: **★ “The Drum" (1938,
Adventure) Raymond Massey, Sabu.
©
WB
Full House
(In Stereo)
Family
Matters BB
Doogie
Howser
Different
World SB
Cops (In
Stereo) BB
LAPD: Life
on the Beat
Sister,
Sister (R) BB
Steve
Harvey BB
Jamie Foxx
“Westside”
Wayans
Bros. (R) BB
Mama’s
Family
Mama’s
Family
Highway
Patrol
Judge Judy
(In Stereo)
Strange
Universe
Paid
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Home
Videos
*** “Small
Sacrifices"
©
UPN
Fresh
Prince
Mr. Cooper
Simpsons
(In Stereo)
Martin (In
Stereo) BB
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Improve.
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(In Stereo) BB
Star Trek: Voyager “Real
Life” (R) (In Stereo) BB
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Fresh
Prince
Married...
With
Star Trek: The Next
Generation (In Stereo) ®
Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine (In Stereo) ffl
©
PBS
Kratts’
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Guy
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Lehrerffl
Business
Report
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Attenborough in
Paradise (In Stereo) BB
World of National
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Nature “Leopard: A
Darkness in the Grass" SB
Being
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Attenborough in
Paradise (In Stereo) ®
World of National
Geographic ®
©
CBS
Mad About
You SB
Mad About
You BB
Seinfeld
“The Note”
CBS News
Hard Copy
BB
Rescue 911
(In Stereo)
Nanny “The
Fifth Wheel"
Murphy
Brown BB
Coast to Coast (In Stereo)
BB
Before Your Eyes: What
Happened to Brock? EE
Late Show (In Stereo) ®
Hard Copy
®
Late Late Show Actress
Lea Thompson. (In Stereo)
Gordon
Elliott (R) |
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
New Mike Hammer “Lady
Killer”
Quincy “Sleeping Dogs”
Law & Order “American
Dream" ®
Biography: Earp Brothers:
Lawmen
American Justice
"Outlaws”
20th Century (R)
Law & Order “The Fertile
Fields" ffl
Biography: Earp Brothers:
Lawmen
American Justice
"Outlaws" (R)
AMC
Movie: "The Paradine Case"{ 1948) A lawyer falls
for a woman accused of murdering her husband.
Movie: **★ “Northwest Mounted Police" (1940) A
Texas Ranger pursues a murderer to Canada.
Remember
WENN3B
[Movie: ** “The Damned Don't Cry"
(1950, Drama) Joan Crawford.
Movie: -k-k-kVi “Compulsion" (1959, Drama) Based on
the Loeb-Leopold murder case of 1920s Chicago, ffl
Movie: *** “Northwest
Mounted Police" (1940)
BET
(4:00) Rap City
Benson
Screen
Town Hall: Race Relations-Bridging the Gap
Hit List
Comicview
Talk | Benson
| Rap City
DISC
Travelers (R)
Movie
Magic (R)
Beyond
2000
Wings “The Valiant Few”
(R)
[Wild Discovery “Animal
I.Q. --Talking Sense"
Discover Magazine
“Aircrashes" (R)
World of Discovery:
Bikini: Paradise
Wild Discovery “Animal
I.Q. -- Talking Sense" (R)
Discover Magazine
“Aircrashes" (R)
World of Discovery:
Bikini: Paradise
ESPN
NFL
Moments
NBA’s
Great
Up Close
Sportscenter
Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) ®
|Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) BB
Sports
center ffl
FAM
Highway to Heaven “The
Reunion” (In Stereo) ®
Carol
Burnett
Carol
Burnett
Waltons “The First
Casualty”
Rescue 911 (In Stereo)®
Hawaii Five-0 “Over 50?
Steal"
700 Club
Three Stooges
Carson
Classics
Carson
Classics
Paid
Program
Paid
Program
LIFE
Golden
Girls ®
Golden
Girls ®
Supermar
ket Sweep
Debt
Intimate Portrait
“Vanessa Williams" (R) ®
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Movie: -tkVi “Taking the Heat” (1993) Lynn Whitfield.
A cop and her murder witness brave heat and hit men.
Homicide: Life on the
Street (In Stereo) ffl
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Sisters “Second
Thoughts” (In Stereo) ffl |
NICK
You Afraid?
Rocko’s
Modern Life
Clarissa
Explains
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Doug (In
Stereo) ®
Rugrats (In
Stereo) ®
Hey Arnold!
(In Stereo)
Bewitched
Bewitched
Bewitched
Bewitched
“Prodigy"
Bewitched
Bewitched
Newhart ffl
Odd Couple
ffl
Taxi®
Mary Tyler
Moore ffl
Dick Van
Dyke
SCIFI
Six Million Dollar Man
Twilight Z.
Darkside
Contact
In Space
Seaquest DSV (In Stereo)
Movie: -kV.2 "Blue Monkey" I
[1987) Steve Railsback.
Contact
In Space
Seaquest DSV (In Stereo)
[Movie: *’/2 "Blue Monkey"|
TBS
Mini
Disaster
Home
Videos
Saved by
the Bell ®
Saved by
the Bell ®
Family
Matters ®
Family
Matters ®
Movie: ★* "Medicine Man" (1992) Sean Connery. A
colleague disrupts a researcher's work in the Amazon.
Movie: ★★★'/z “The Road Warrior" {1981) Mel Gibson.
A loner defends oil producers from sadistic nomads.
Movie: ** "The Protector” (1985) Jackie Chan. A high-j
kicking lawman and his partner hunt a drug lord.
TLC
Homebods
Home Pro
Furniture
Renovation
Hometime
Hometime
SeaTek(R) |Science |Ancient Prophecies
Wolfman-Myth |SeaTek(R) | Science
Ancient Prophecies | Wolfman-Myth
TNT
(4:00) Movie: *★ “The
Quick Gun" (1964)
In the Heat of the Night
“AKA Kelly Kay" ®
Kung Fu: The Legend
Continues
Movie: *** “El Dorado" [ 1967, Western) John Wayne, Robert
Mitchum. A gunfighter and a drunken sheriff face an evil land baron.
Movie: ***'/2 “The Sons of Katie Elder” (1965, Western) John Wayne, Dean
Martin, Martha Hyer. Four brothers swear to avenge their father’s death.
Movie: “Fort 1
\Apache"
USA
Wings (In
Stereo)®
Wings (In
Stereo) ®
Renegade “Another Place
and Time" (In Stereo) ®
Highlander: The Series
“Cross of St. Antoine” ®
Murder, She Wrote "The
Szechuan Dragon” ®
Movie: "The Godfather" (1972) Marlon Brando.
A Mafia patriarch tries to hold his empire together.
Silk Stalkings “Dirty
Laundry” (R) (In Stereo) ffl
Renegade “Paradise Lost”
(In Stereo) ffl
| Magnum, P.l. “Paniolo” ffl J
DISN
Chip ’n’
Dale
Goof Troop
®
Flash
Forward®
[Torkelsons
(In Stereo)
Movie: **Vi2 "Hocus Pocus" {1993,
Comedy) Bette Midler. (In Stereo) ‘PG’ ®
[Movie: **'/!2 "Freaky Friday"(1995,
Comedy) Shelley Long. BB
[Movie: "The Incredible Shrinking Woman” (1981) The
chemicals in aerosol spray cans shrink a housewife.
Movie: 2 “Fantastic Voyage" (1966,
Science Fiction) Stephen Boyd. ‘PG’ ffl
“Darby ;
| O'Gill"
HBO
(4:45) Movie: ★★V2 “A Walk in the
Clouds" (1995) Keanu Reeves. ‘PG-13’
Movie: ** “Think Big" (1990, Comedy)
David and Peter Paul. (In Stereo) ‘PG-13’
[Movie: **'/2 “The Cable Guy"(1996,
Comedy) Jim Carrey. 'PG-13' ffl
[Comedy Hour: “Sinbad: Nothin' but the
Funk" (R) (In Stereo) ffl
Perversions
of Science
Oz “God's Chillin’’ (R) (In
Stereo)ffl
Sinbad’s Summer Jam 3: ’70s Soul
Music Festival (R) (In Stereo) ffl
MAX
(4:45) Movie: “Playing Dangerous 2"
1996, Suspense) Richard Gilliland. ‘NR’
Movie: “Spill" (1996, Adventure) Brian
Bosworth. (In Stereo) ‘PG-13’ (Violence)
Movie: k-kVi “The Arrival" (1996) An astronomer
detects evidence of impending alien contact. ‘PG-13’ ffl
Movie: ** “The Road Killers" (1995,
| Suspense) Christopher Lambert. ‘R’
Movie: **★ “Maybe... Maybe Not”
(1994, Comedy) Til Schweiger. ‘R’ ffl
Movie: ★* “Criminal
Hearts" (1995, Drama) ‘R’
PASS
Races-Hazel Park
Drag Racing: NHRA |Cycle World
This Week in NASCAR |Motorsports Hour
Speed
Pro Beach Soccer
Futbol | Sports Writers on TV
Page One | Gyro Seven
SHO
(3:50) Movie: iHHr'/i
“Three Women" (1977)
Movie: *** “Eight Men Ouf"(1988) Eight ballplayers
are accused of throwing the World Series. ‘PG’ ®
Movie: ★★ “Striptease" (1996) Demi Moore. A Miami
mother becomes a stripper to raise some quick cash. BB
Dead Man’s
Gun
Poltergeist: The Legacy
Rachel seeks answers, ffl
Movie: *★ "Fright Night Part 2" (1988,
Horror) Roddy McDowall. (In Stereo) ‘R’
Movie: ** “Castle Freak"
(1995) Jeffrey Combs. 'R'
TMC
(3:50) Movie
Movie: ★★ “Rave Review" (t994,
Comedy) Jeff Seymour. (In Stereo) ‘NR’
Movie: ★★ “City Hall" (1996, Drama) Al Pacino. A boy’s
death threatens a New York mayor's administration. ‘R’
Movie: "Tales From a Parallel Universe: 1
Worship His Shadow" (1997) ‘R’
Movie: ★ “The Pamela Principle 2”
(1994, Drama) India Allen. (In Stereo) ‘R’
Movie: ★V2 "Emmanuelle 4” (1984, Adult) A sexual
adventuress undergoes extensive plastic surgery. 'R'
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8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
FOX
0
Eyewitness Morning
Fox After Breakfast SB
Crook & Chase (In Stereo)
Extra SB | Hollywood
News
Real TV El
Geraldo Rivera SB
Dating |Newlywed
Ricki Lake (R)
Rosie O’Donnell (R) ffi
NBC
O
(7:00) Today (In Stereo) HI
Maury SB
Jerry Springer
Jenny Jones (In Stereo)
News
Jeopardy!
Days of Our Lives SB
Another World ffi
Sally
Montel Williams ffi
ABC
o
Good Morning America
Regis & Kathie
Maureen O'Boyle
Rolonda (R)
News
Pt. Charles
All My Children SB
One Life to Live ffi
General Hos
aital ®
Oprah Winfrey ffi
CBC
0
(7:00) CBC Morning News
Playground |SesamePk
Theodore |Mr. Dressup
Wimzie | Lead SB
Midday SB
Encore to Pamela Wallin
E.N.G “Public Enemy” GB
Coronation
Urban P.
Jonovision
The Bill
WB
©
Gargoyles
JonQuest
In the Heat of the Night
Medicine Woman
700 Club (Left in Progress)
Beverly Hills, 90210 SB
Baywatch “Sharks Cove"
Bzzz!
Bananas
Garfield
Quack Pack
BugsDaffy
Animaniacs
UPN
©
Mask
Sky Danc’r
Bobby | Dinosaurs
Movie
All-Family
Sanford fGood Times
King Arthur
Aladdin GB
Batman
Eek.'stravag
Beetleborgs
Twist
PBS
©
Tots TV ffi
Station
Sesame Street (In Stereo)
Barney |Mr Rogers
Storytime | Reading
Lamb Chop
Puzzle
Sesame Street (In Stereo)
Barney
Couch
Arthur®
Magic Bus
C. Sandiego
Wishbone
CBS
GB
(7:00) This Morning ffi
Rockford Files
Guiding Light (In Stereo)
Price Is Right SB
WKRP
Young and the Restless |Bold & B.
As the World Turns GE
Gordon Elliott (R)
Murphy
Designing
A&E
Columbo “Now You See Him"
Cosby Mysteries |New Mike Hammer
Quincy “Across the Line” |Law & Order “Severance" |Columbo “Now You See Him" |Cosby Mysteries
AMC
(6:30) Movie |Movie: ★★ V2 "Son of Fury" (1942)
Movie: ★★ “The Damned Don’t Cry” (1950, Drama)
★★V2 “The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms" jMovie: ★★★ “Flesh and Fantasy" (1943) jMovie: ★★★V2 “A Double Life"(1947) Ronald Colman.
BET
Link of Love
Thea
Hit List
Video Vibrations
Planet Groove
Rap City
DISC
Paid Prog. | Paid Prog.
Cuisine
Graham K.
Home Matters (R)
Housesmart! (R)
Start _ | Interior Mot.
Home Matters (R)
Housesmart! (R) *
Interior Mot.
Start
Great Chefs | Great Chefs
ESPN
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Golf: Senior British Open -- First Round. (Live)
Sportscenter (R)
Women’s Volleyball
Surfing (R) [Signature
Sr. PGA
Inside PGA
PGA Golf (Live)
FAM
Father Dowling Mysteries
Waltons (Part 1 of 2)
700 Club |FitTV
Rescue 911 (In Stereo) SB
Home & Family (In Stereo)
ShopDrop
Shopping
Animal |Animal
LIFE
Baby
Kids These
Sisters (In Stereo) SB
Handmade
Gourmet
Our Home (In Stereo)
Living
Ingredient
Supermkt
Debt
Movie: “Labor of Love: The Arlette Schweitzer Story"
Commish (In Stereo) ffi
NICK
Looney
Rugrats SB
Little Bear |BlueClue
Busy World
Muppets
Allegra
Gullah
Little Bear
BlueClue
Rupert
Beaver
Tiny Toon
Looney
Nick in the Afternoon
SCIFI
Transfrmrs
In Space
Lost in Space
Voyage to Bottom of Sea
DarkShad
DarkShad
Ripley’s Believe It or Not
Mysteries
Monsters
Gallery
Beyond
Incredible Hulk
Land of the Giants
TBS
Gilligan
Bewitched
Little House
3’s Co.
Mama
Griffith
Griffith
Matlock “The Heiress" SB
Movie: ★V2 "Return to the Blue Lagoon” (1991)
Flintstones
Flintstones
Looney
Brady
TLC
David
Madison
Little Star
Rory
Pappyland
David
Critters
Iris the Prof.
Carlo | Kitchen
Homeworks
Home
DreamLiv [Great Inns
Wedding
Wedding
Gardening
Hometime
TNT
Scooby Dooby Doo
Flintstones
Flintstones
Gilligan
Gilligan
Spenser: For Hire
Outer Limits
Twilight Z.
Twilight Z.
Nightmare Years (R) (In Stereo) (Part 3 of 4) GB
“40 Guns to Apache Pass” |
USA
Mighty Max
Sailor Moon
Facts-Life
Facts-Life
Major Dad
Major Dad
Wings SB
Wings SB
Movie: ★★ "Freefall" (1994, Drama) Eric Roberts.
Movie: ★Vi "Smokey and the Bandit 3" (1983, Comedy)
Big Date
Big Date
DISN
Chip-Dale
Mermaid
Pooh
Katie-Orbie
Mickey
Wonderland
GummiBr
Madeline SB
Mermaid |Pooh | Ducktales
Donald
Movie: ★★V2 “The Hobbit" (1977) GB
C. Brown
Tale Spin ffi
Ducktales
HBO
Cable Guy
"Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls" {1995)
Spell God
Movie: ★★’/2 “Pee-wee’s Big Adventure"
Movie: “The Amazing Panda Adventure"
First Look
Movie: ★★Vi “Runaway" (1984) ‘PG-13’
Movie: ★★'/2 “Red Hot" (1993) ’PG’ ® |
MAX
Movie: ★★ "The Power Within" (1995) SB
Movie: ★★★’/2 “True Grit” (1969, Western) John Wayne. ‘G’ SB
Movie: ★★ “Mr. Sardonicus"[ 1961)
Movie: ★ “A Fine Mess" (1986) ’PG’ ffi |Movie: “The Indian in the Cupboard" ffi |
"Roxanne"
PASS
Spruce | Futbol
Bodies
Training | Body
Bodies jTraining (Training
USISL Soccer: Connecticut at Long Island
Spruce |Cheerleading (R) |Cycling (R)
Planet X
Kidsports
SHO
(7:30) Movie: "Walk-Love"
Movie: “All Dogs Go to Heaven 2" (1996)
Movie: ★★★ "The Second Time Around" (1961) | Movie: “Master of the World" (1961)
Movie: ★★Vi “Brother Sun, Sister Moon" (1973) 'PG'
Movie: ★★★ “Tap" (1989) |
TMC
(7:50) Movie: "The Baby-Sitters Club" SB |Movie: "HoneySweet Love" (1994) ‘NR’ | Movie: ★★V2 “Heartburn” (1986) Jack Nicholson. ‘R’ | Movie: -k-k'A "AlmostYou"
1984) ‘R’ GB |Movie: “On a Clear Day You Can See Forever" (1970) | “Burnt-Sun" \
| THURSDAY EVENING JULY 24,1997
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30 |
0
FOX
News
News
Cheers (In
Stereo) ffi
Access
Hollywood
Extra (In
Stereo) SB
Martin (In
Stereo) SB
Living
Single SB
New York Undercover
“The Promised Land" SB
News
Cheers
“Rebound”
M*A*S*H GB
Who’s the
Boss? ®
Cosby
Show®
Dating
Game
Newlywed
Game
o
NBC
News
News
NBC Nightly
News SB
Wheel of
Fortune SB
Jeopardy!
SB
Friends (In
Stereo) SB
Men Behav-
Bad
Seinfeld (In
Stereo) SB
Suddenly
Susan SB
ER "Ask Me No Questions,
I’ll Tell You No Lies” (R) SB
News
Tonight Show (In Stereo)
GB
Jenny Jones Past female
guests are featured. ®
Paid
Program
o
ABC
News
News
ABC Wld
News
Ent. Tonight
High Incident “Christmas
Blues” (R) (In Stereo) SB
Turning Point (R) SB
Politically
Incorrect SB
Politically
Incorrect ffi
News
Detroit: July
1967
Nightline ®
Inside
Edition ®
American
Journal ffi |
Politically
Incorrect®
o
CBC
Futureworld
SB
News SB
CBC News
On the
Road Again
On the Arts
SB
Ruth Rendell Mysteries Wedding guests Wexford and
Burden investigate the bride’s death.
National/CBC News SB
News GB
Comics! (R)
GB
Stopwatch
Movie: “North of Pittsburgh" (1992,
Comedy-Drama) Jeff Schultz. ®
©
WB
Full House
(In Stereo)
Family
Matters SB
Doogie
Howser
Different
World SB
Cops (In
Stereo) SB
LAPD: Life
on the Beat
Movie: ★★★ “New Jack City"( 1991) Wesley Snipes.
Two street-smart cops try to bust a venomous drug lord.
Mama’s
Family
Mama’s
Family
Highway
Patrol
Judge Judy
(In Stereo)
Strange
Universe
Paid
Program
Home
Videos
★★* "Small
Sacrifices”
SD
UPN
Fresh
Prince
Mr. Cooper
Simpsons
(In Stereo)
Martin (In
Stereo) SB
Home
Improve.
Home
Improve.
Movie
News
Fresh
Prince
Married...
With
Star Trek: The Next
Generation (In Stereo) ®
Star Trek: De
Nine (In Stere
ep Space
so) ffi
©
PBS
Kratts’
Creatures
Science
Guy
Newshour With Jim
Lehrer SB
Business
Report
Great Lakes
Outdoors
New Yankee
Workshop
This Old
House SB
Practical
Sports
Backstage
Pass
Mystery! “Maigret" (R)
(Part 6 of 6) SB
Being
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Mad About
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Rescue 911
(In Stereo)
Diagnosis Murder
“Passion for Murder" SB
Moloney “The Ripple
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48 Hours “Stopping the
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Movie: ★★★ “The Virgin Queen"(1955,
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biography of legendary blues singer Huddie Ledbetter. 'PG'
Movie: ★★VI“The Family
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Wild Discovery “The
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Magic (R)
Wings “Wings Over the
Pacific” (R)
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PGA Golf: Greater
Hartford Open
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Sportscenter
Billiards: Ultimate Nine-
Ball Challenge.
Rodeo: Calgary Stampede Showdown. From Calgary,
Alta.
Baseball
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Baseball
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Tour De
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Boxing (R)
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“Choices" (In Stereo) SB
Carol
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Rescue 911 (In Stereo) SB
Hawaii Five-0 “The
Reunion"
700 Club
Three Stooges
Carson
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Carson
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Paid
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Golden
Girls SB
Golden
Girls SB
Supermar
ket Sweep
Debt
Intimate Portrait “Shirley
MacLaine” (In Stereo) SB
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Movie: "High
radio news re
Sfa/ces”(1997) Cynthia Gibb. A former
porter becomes a compulsive gambler. SB
Homicide: Life on the
Street (In Stereo) GB
Unsolved
Mysteries
Wire (R) (In
Stereo)
Wire (R) (In
Stereo)
Dish (R) (In
Stereo)
NICK
You Afraid?
Rocko’s
Modern Life
Clarissa
Explains
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Doug (In
Stereo) SB
Rugrats (In
Stereo) SB
Secret of
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Happy Days
Happy Days
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Happy Days
Happy Days
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Newhart GB
Odd Couple
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Taxi “Blind
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Mary Tyler
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Twilight Z.
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Sightings (In Stereo) SB
Seaquest DSV “Games”
Movie: ★’/2 “Bug” (1975) Bradford Dillman.
Sightings (In Stereo) GB
Seaquest DSV “Games"
Movie: ★ 1 /2 Bug (1975) 1
TBS
Home
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Saved by
the Bell SB
Saved by
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Family
Matters SB
Family
Matters SB
Movie: ★★V2 "Stone Cold"( 1991) Brian Bosworth. A
motorcycle cop infiltrates a sadistic biker gang.
Movie: ★★'/> “The Perfect Weapon" (1991, Drama) A
vengeful martial artist challenges his mentor’s killer.
Movie: ★% “Gymkata"(1955, Adventure) Kurt Thomas. 1
An agent attempts to secure a military site in Asia.
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“First Girl" (In Stereo) SB
Kung Fu: The Legend
Continues
Movie: ★★★ "The Undefeated" (1969, Western) John Wayne, Rock
Hudson. Two Civil War veterans battle Mexican revolutionaries.
Movie: ★★★★ "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" (1962) James
Stewart. A lawyer finds fame by supposedly gunning down an outlaw.
Movie: ★★★★ “Red River"
(1948) John Wayne.
USA
Wings (In
Stereo) SB
Wings (In
Stereo) SB
Renegade “Baby Makes
Three” (In Stereo) SB
Highlander: The Series
“Rite of Passage" SB
Murder, She Wrote "Trials
and Tribulations" SB
Movie: ★★★★ “The Godfather, Part II" (1974, Drama)
The saga of the Corleone crime family continues.
Silk Stalkings “Men
Seeking Women" (R) GB
Renegade “Sins of the
Father" (In Stereo) ®
Magnum, P.l. “The
Treasure of Kalaniopu’u”
DISN
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Dale
Goof Troop
SB
Flash
Forward SB
Torkelsons
(In Stereo)
Movie: ★★'/2 "Twice Upon
a Time" 11983) ‘PG’ SB
Movie: ★★★ “The Dark Crystal" (1982) Jim Henson.
Two elfin beings undertake a magical quest. 'PG' SB
Movie: ★★★ "The Black Hole" (1979,
Science Fiction) Maximilian Schell. ‘PG’
Movie: ★★V2 “Tron" (1982, Fantasy) Jeff
Bridges. (In Stereo) ’PG’ ffi
Movie: ★★V2 “Bell, Book
and Candle" (1958) ffi
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(3:45) Movie
Movie: ★★ “Ace Ventura: When Nature
\calls"( 1995) Jim Carrey. ’PG-13’ SB
Movie: ★★Vi "Tremors II: Aftershocks" (1996) Giant
subterranean worms surface at a Mexican oil refinery.
Movie: “Plato’s Run" (1997, Suspense)
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Conspiracy
Theory
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Movie: ★★ “Carpool" (1996, Comedy)
Tom Arnold. (In Stereo) ‘PG’ SB
Movie: ★’/2 “Poison Ivy II: Lily" (1996) Alyssa Milano.
An old diary draws an art student into a world of desire.
Movie: “Freeway" (1996) A troubled teen
is drawn into a murderer’s twisted game.
Movie: ★★★ "Patriot Games" (1992, Suspense) Harrison Ford. A
former CIA agent is stalked by a vengeful IRA terrorist. ‘R’ GB
PASS
Races-Hazel Park
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Auto Racing: Legends Summer Shootout Series.
Basketball: China vs. Team USA
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(4:15) Movie: ★★* "Tap"
(1989) Gregory Hines.
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(1996) Voices of Charlie Sheen. ‘G’ SB
Movie: ★★★ “The American President" (1995) A U.S.
president risks his political future for love. ’PG-13’ El
Movie: ★★★ “The Birdcage" (1996) Robin Williams. A
son’s engagement throws a kink into a gay couple’s life.
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Air
Movie: “North Shore Fish" (1997,
Comedy-Drama) Tony Danza. (In Stereo) 1
TMC
(4:40) Movie: ★★★% "Burnt by the Sun" (1994) A lover
from his wife’s past darkens a Russian man’s door. ‘R’
Movie: ★★★ "Thunderheart" (1992) Val Kilmer. An
agent's heritage is integral to a murder investigation. ‘R’
Movie: ★★★ V2 “The Usual Suspects" (1995) Five small
time criminals begin an ill-fated association. ‘R’ SB
Movie: ★★ "Lord of Illusions" (1995) Scott Bakula. A
private detective runs afoul of diabolical cultists. ‘R’ GB
Movie: ★ , /2 "Shopping
1(1994) Sadie Frost. ‘R’
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! | The Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employes I §
Continues to support the Detroit Newspaper Workers
■ ■ '• anc * sa l ute them for their stand against corporate greed.
1 jl ™ President: M. A. FLEMING Sec. Treasurer: W. E. LaRUE ,
MANCINI, SCHREUDER,
KLINE, and CONRAD, P.C.
For 23 Years, Attorneys Representing
Injured Workers and Their Families
We Support Your Right To Fight
For Dignity and Justice
28225 Mound Rd., Warren, MI
(810) 751-3900
Utility Workers
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Substation Division
We support our Brothers & Sisters
in their struggle and stand united
■■I,Union Bustin*


FRIDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON
JULY 25,1997
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 1:00 1:30
2:00
2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
FOX
0
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Fox After Breakfast [
Crook & Chase (In Stereo)
Extra SB |Hollywood
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Ricki Lake (R)
Rosie O’Donnell (R)!
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Maury ED
Jerry Springer
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News
Jeopardy!
Days of Our Lives i
Another World i
Sally
Montel Williams [3]
ABC
Good Morning America
Regis & Kathie
Maureen O’Boyle
Rolonda (R)
News
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All My Children I
One Life to Live I
General Hospital
Oprah Winfrey !
CBC
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(7:00) CBC Morning News
Playground |SesamePk
Theodore |Mr.Dressup
Wimzie
Lead!
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Reflections
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Medicine Woman
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Beverly Hills, 90210!
Baywatch “Blindside" [
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SunsetBch Griffith
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Batman
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Barney
Mr Rogers
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Price Is Right [
WKRP
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As the World Turns!
Gordon Elliott (R)
Murphy
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McMillan and Wife “Secrets for Sale"
Cosby Mysteries
New Mike Hammer
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| Law & Order SB
McMillan and Wife “Secrets for Sale"
| Cosby Mysteries
AMC
Movie: ★**
‘Dead Ringer’
(1964, Drama) Bette Davis.
Movie: **★ “Leadbelly" (1975, Biography) Roger E. Mosley. ‘PG’
Movie: “Riders of Destiny" | Movie: ** “Good Sam" (1948, Comedy) Gary Cooper.
Movie: ** “Trail of Robin Hood" (1950)
BET
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Cuisine
Graham K.
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Housesmart! (R)
Start
[interior Mot. |Home Matters (R)
[Housesmart! (R)
[interior Mot. |Start
Great Chefs | Great Chefs
ESPN
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Golf: Senior British Open -
Second Round. (Live)
Golf: U.S. Junior Amateur Championship
|Senior PGA Golf: Franklin Quest Championship
PGA Golf (Live)
FAM
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Waltons (Part 2 of 2)
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Home & Family (In Stereo)
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|Movie: ★* “Teen Wolf"(1985) Michael J. Fox.
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Flintstones
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| Great Inns
Wedding
Wedding
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Flintstones
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|Outer Limits
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Twilight Z.
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| “Gunfight-Creek"
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Major Dad
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Wings SB
[Movie: -kVt “ColdSweaf”(1993) Shannon Tweed. IB
Movie: ** “Hard to Hold" (1984) Rick Springfield.
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Big Date
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Mermaid
Pooh
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Madeline SB
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Movie: ** “A Kid in King Arthur's Court"
[cT Brown
Tale Spin SB
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Movie: * 1 /2 “Black Sheep" (1996) SB
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|Movie: “American Shaolin: King of the Kickboxers IT I
Movie: ** “Northern Passage" (1995)
| Inventors’ Special (R)SB
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|Movie: ** “Author! Author!"(1982) Al Pacino. 'PG'
Movie: ** “Thirteen Frightened Girls"
|Movie: ** “Down Periscope" (1996) SB
Movie: “Peggy Sue Got Married" (1986)
"Clueless"
PASS
Musclesport USA (R)
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Water Skiing (R)
Pro Beach Soccer (R)
|Transworld Sport
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Movie: * “Speed Zone!" (1989) John Candy. 'PG'
Movie: *★ “Claudine"( 1974) 'PG'
|Movie: "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” (1969) [Movie:** “Bingo" (1991, Comedy) ‘PGH
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| Movie: *** ‘
“Moonlight and Valentino" (1995) ‘R’ SB
| Movie: “The Run of the Country" (1995) |
1 FRIDAY EVENING
JULY 25,1997
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
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10:00
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1:30 I
BROADCAST CHANNELS
O
FOX
News
News
Cheers (In
Stereo) SB
Access
Hollywood
Extra (In
Stereo) SB
Sliders “The Prince of
Slides” (R) (In Stereo) SB
Millennium “Wide Open”
(R) (In Stereo) (PA) SB
News
Cheers SB
M*A*S‘H SB
Who’s the
Boss? SB
Cosby
Show SB
Dating
Game
Newlywed
Game
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NBC
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News
NBC Nightly
News SB
Wheel of
Fortune SB
Jeopardy!
SB
Unsolved Mysteries (R)
(In Stereo) SB
Dateline (In Stereo) BB
Homicide: Life on the
Street (R) SB
News
Tonight Show (In Stereo)
SB
Jenny Jones Harassed
because of weight. SB
Paid
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ABC
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News
ABC Wld
News
Ent. Tonight
Step by
Step SB
Boy Meets
World (R) SB
Sabrina-
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Clueless (In
Stereo) SB
20/20 SB
News
Nightline SB
Inside
Edition SB
American
Journal SB
Politically
| Incorrect SB
Matlock
"The Coach”
O
CBC
Fashion File
SB
News SB
CBC News
To Be Announced
National/CBC News SB
News SB
Dumaurier Concert Stage
(Off Air)
©
WB
Full House
(In Stereo)
Family
Matters SB
Doogie
Howser
Different
World SB
Cops (In
Stereo) SB
LAPD: Life
on the Beat
Movie:* “Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare" (1991,
Horror) Robert Englund, Lisa Zane, Shon Greenblatt.
Mama’s Mama’s
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Highway
Patrol
Judge Judy
(In Stereo)
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Eddie (R) SB
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Goode
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News
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Star Trek: The Next
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Star Trek: Deep Space
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©
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Business
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Movie: *** “Operation Crossbow"(1965) Allies must
destroy several German missile-building sites.
Being
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World of National
Geographic SB
Movie: *** “Operation
Crossbow" (1965)
©
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Mad About
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Mad About
You SB
Seinfeld (In
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CBS News
Hard Copy
SB
Rescue 911
(In Stereo)
Television’s Comedy
Classics (In Stereo) SB
JAG “Jinx" (R) (In Stereo)
SB
Nash Bridges “Hit
Parade” (R) (In Stereo) SB
Late Show Actor Samuel
L. Jackson. (In Stereo) SB
Hard Copy
SB
Late Late Show Actor
Keenen Ivory Wayans. SB
Fire Rescue |
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
New Mike Hammer “A
Face in the Night"
Quincy "Next Stop
Nowhere"
Law & Order “Sisters of
Mercy" SB
Biography: Jayne
Mansfield
Movie: “Cracker: White Ghost” (1996) Robbie Coltrane.
A serial killer strikes while Fitz is visiting Hong Kong.
Law & Order "Skin Deep"
Biography: Jayne
Mansfield
Movie: “Cracker: White
Ghost” (1996, Mystery)
AMC
Republic Pictures Story (R)
Movie: ★** “Land of the Pharaohs" (1955, Drama) A
pharaoh builds the first of the great Egyptian pyramids.
Movie: *** “The Seven Year Itch" (1955, Comedy) A
happily married man meets an attractive blonde. SB
Movie: **V4 “Red Line 7000" (1965) James Caan. The
tense lives of stock-car racers and their loved ones.
Movie: *** "The Seven
Year Itch" (1955, Comedy)
BET
(4:00) Rap City
Benson
News
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News
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Rap City
DISC
Travelers (R)
Movie
Magic (R)
Beyond
2000
Strange Planes “Giants”
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Wild Discovery: Bears of
the Great Lakes
Discovery
News
World of
Wonder (R)
Fangs! “Wild Dog - The
Last Stand" (R)
Wild Discovery: Bears of
the Great Lakes
Discovery
News (R)
World of
Wonder (R)
Fangs! “Wild Dog -- The
Last Stand” (R)
ESPN
PGA Golf: Greater
Hartford Open
Up Close
Sportscenter
Superbouts
Boxing: Orlando Canizales vs. Edwin Santana. (Live)
Baseball
Tonight
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Baseball
Tonight
Tour De
France
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Highway to Heaven “To
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Hollywood’s Private
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Very Best of Ed Sullivan II (R)
Hawaii Five-0 “Force of
Waves"
700 Club
Three Stooges
Carson
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Paid
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Paid
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LIFE
Golden
Girls HB
Golden
Girls SB
Supermar-
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Debt
Movie: ★*% “Code of Silence" (1985) A Chicago cop
wages a private war against rival drug gangs.
WNBA Basketball: Los Angeles Sparks at Phoenix
Mercury. From America West Arena. (Live)
Homicide: Life on the
Street “Fits Like a Glove”
Unsolved
Mysteries
Wire (R) (In
Stereo)
Wire (R) (In
Stereo)
Dish (R) (In
Stereo)
NICK
You Afraid?
Rocko’s
Modern Life
Clarissa
Explains
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Doug (In
Stereo)!
Rugrats (In
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Kablam! (R)
(In Stereo)
I Dream of
Jeannie
I Dream of
Jeannie
I Dream of
Jeannie
I Dream of
Jeannie
I Dream of
Jeannie
I Dream of
Jeannie
Newhart!
Odd Couple
“The Frog”
Taxi "The
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Mary Tyler
Moore SB
Dick Van
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SCIFI
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Making
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Night Stalker
Movie: *★★ “The Howling" (1981) Dee Wallace.
Fri. the 13th Series
Night Stalker
Movie: ★** "The Howling" (1981) Dee Wallace.
TBS
Home
Videos
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Videos
Saved by
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Saved by
the Bell SB
Family
Matters!
Major League Baseball: Atlanta Braves at Cincinnati Reds. From Cinergy Field.
(Live) SB
Movie: **Vi “Jumpin'Jack Flash" (1986, Comedy) A
computer operator becomes involved in espionage.
jQuest (R) jPaleoworld Armageddon (R)
Movie: “Poison Ivy" (1992) A teen-age
temptress disrupts a wealthy household.
lU-F.O-(R)
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Homebods Home Pro
Furniture
Renovation
Hometime Hometime Quest (R) jPaleoworld |Armageddon
U.F.O. (R)
TNT
(4:00) Movie: “Gunfightat
Comanche Creek" (1963)
In the Heat of the Night
“December Days" SB
Kung Fu: The Legend
Continues
Movie: “Rough Riders" (1997) Tom Berenger. The
story of Theodore Roosevelt’s famous cavalry group.
Movie: "Rough Riders" (1997) Tom Berenger. The
story of Theodore Roosevelt's famous cavalry group.
Movie: **Vi “The Avenging Angel” (1995) Brigham
Young's bodyguard uncovers a deadly conspiracy. I
USA
Wings (In
Stereo) SB
Wings (In
Stereo) SB
Renegade "High Rollers”
(R) (In Stereo) BB
Highlander: The Series
“Courage" (In Stereo) BB
Big Easy “Yellow Queen
in the Fires of Hell" (R) SB
Movie: **★* “The Godfather, Part II" (1974, Drama)
The saga of the Corleone crime family continues.
Movie: ★** “Hellraiser" (1987) Andrew Robinson.
Clive Barker's otherworldly tale of pain and torture.
Movie: ** “Hellhound:
Hellraiser //” (1988, Horror)
DISN
Chip 'n'
Dale
Goof Troop
Flash
Forward I
Torkelsons
(In Stereo)
Movie: **% “The Karate Kid, Part Two" (1986) While
visiting Okinawa, Daniel battles his mentor's foes. ‘PG’
Movie: ** “A Kid in King Arthur’s Court"
(1995) Thomas Ian Nicholas. 'PG' BB
Movie: ★* “The Dirt Bike Kid" (1985,
Movie: **’/2 "Summer Magic" (1963) Hayley Mills. A
widow searches for an affordable family home. ‘G 1 BB
HBO
(4:45) Movie: *Vi “The New Adventures
of Pippi Longstocking"(1988) Tami Erin.
Movie: kVi “Black Sheep" (1996,
Comedy) Chris Farley. 'PG-13' I
Movie: ** “The Substitute" (1996) Tom Berenger. A
mercenary cleans up a drug-infested Miami high school.
Movie: "Perfect Target" (1997, Drama)
Daniel Bernhardt. (In Stereo) ‘R 1 BB
Dennis
Radio Sex 2
Perversions
Miller SB
of Science
Movie: ★* "Beyond
Desire” (1995) ‘R'SB
MAX
(4:45) Movie: *★* "Clueless" (1995,
Comedy) Alicia Silverstone. ‘PG-13 1 SB
Movie: *** “Dunston Checks /n” (1996,
Comedy) Jason Alexander. 'PG'
Movie: *** “Kansas City"(1996) A Depression-era
woman kidnaps a political adviser’s wife. ‘R 1 ~
Movie: *★* “Natural Born Killers” {1994, Drama)
Bloodthirsty young lovers become instant celebrities. *R’
Movie: "Broadcast Bombshells” (1995,
Comedy) Amy Lynn Baxter. 'NR'
[Trackside
Hot Line (In
Stereo)
PASS
Races-Hazel Park
SHO
(4:20) Movie: **★ “The
American President" SB
Cycling
Game Night |Major League Baseball: Milwaukee Brewers at Detroit Tigers. From Tiger StadiumT
Baseball
Movie: * "SpeedZone!"{1989) John Candy. Zany
drivers compete in a coast-to-coast automobile race.
TMC
Movie: **** “The French Connection" (1971) Two
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Movie: ★★ “Mulholland Falls" (1996) Nick Nolte. A cop
in postwar L.A. searches for his ex-lover’s killer. ‘R* I
Outer
Limits
Movie: *** “The French Connection II" (1975) A New
York cop goes to Marseilles to break up a drug ring. ‘R’
Movie: “Fargo" (1996) A businessman's
kidnapping scheme spins out of control.
Tennis: ATP Infiniti Open - Quarterfinals. (Live)
Poltergeist: The Legacy
A pool menaces. BB
Movie: *★ “Hard Bounty” {1995,
Western) Kelly LeBrock. (In Stereo) ‘R’
Movie: kVi "Body Count" (1996, Drama)
Brigitte Nielsen. (In Stereo) ‘R’
Major League Baseball
Movie: *’/2 “Under the
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Movie: *'/■2 “Illegal in Blue" (1995) Stacey Dash. A taxi-
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Journal and Detroit
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SATURDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON
JULY 26,1997
8:00
8:30
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9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00 11:30 I 12:00
12:30 1:00 I 1:30
2:00 I 2:30
3:00
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BROADCAST CHANNELS
FOX
0
Eyewitness Weekend
Eagle Rid.
Madison
Jetsons
Flintstones
Ghostwriter In the Zone [Major League Baseball: Regional Coverage
Tarzan: Epic Adventures
NBC
(7:00) Today (In Stereo) I
Newsbeat Tday
Saved-Bell
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Inside Stuff
Paid Prog.
Paid Prog, |Lighter Side [NFL Q’back Challenge |Pro Beach Volleyball
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WB
©
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Movie: -k-kVi “Night Shift"(1982) Henry Winkler.
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UPN
©
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Movie
Movie
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03
Northern
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Anyplace
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©
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AMC
(7:00) Movie: "Brave One"
Movie: ★★'/!2 “Hercules" (1959) Steve Reeves. 'G'
Betty Boop
Tit for Tat
Occupatns iNyoka [Movie: ★★★’/2 “Winchester 73”(1950) James Stewart.
Movie: ★★V2 “Red Line 7000" (1965) James Caan.
BET
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Hit List
Rap City Top 10
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Graham K.
Great Chefs
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Mysterious
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Bey. 2000
Movie
ESPN
Shooting
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Fishing
Fishing [Outdoors
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Brickyard | Auto Racing: ARCA Media One 200
Golf: U.S. Junior Amateur Championship
Cycling
FAM
Three Stooges
Movie: *★ “Bowery Buckaroos" (1947)
Movie: ★★★ “Bandolero!" (1968) Dean Martin. I Bonanza-Lost
Big Valley
Rifleman | Rifleman
High Chaparral
LIFE
Paid Prog.
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Dish (R)
Wire (R)
MensRm
Our Home (R) (In Stereo) |Living
Handmade
Debt
Unsolved Mysteries
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NICK
Doug®
Rugrats ®
Tiny Toon
Tiny Toon
Muppets
Muppets
Gadget
RenStimpy
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Salute
Looney Tunes
You Do
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Gadget iHeyDude
G.U.T.S. | Pete & Pete
SCIFI
Paid Prog.
Paid Prog.
Movie: ★★★V2 “Akira" (1989, Science Fiction) Voices of Mitsuo Iwara. (In Stereo) ®
Genesis
Making
Trailer Park [SF Vortex
TimeTrax “Fire and Ice”
Movie: “Dead Fire” (1997) Matt Frewer. (In Stereo) ® 1
TBS
Flintstones
Taz-Mania
WCW Wrestling
National Geographic Explorer (R) ®
Movie: ★★★'/2 "Heathers” (1988) Winona Ryder.
Movie: ★★ “Summer Girl" (1983) Barry Bostwick.
| Movie: “Poison Ivy” (1992) 1
TLC
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Home Pro |Computer
Homebods gardening
Hometime | Hometime
Renovation | Renovation
Home Pro | Home Pro
Furniture iHomeSvy | Renovation |Renovation
Hometime
Hometime I
TNT
Hondo “The Apache Kid”
Lazarus Man (In Stereo)
How the West Was Won
Wild, Wild West
Brisco County
Movie: ★★★Vi2 “How the West Was Won" (1962, Western) George Peppard, Debbie Reynolds.
Bugs
USA
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Pacific Blue “Daystalker”
Wings ® |Movie: “OurMother's Murder" (1997) Roxanne Hart. ®
Movie: ★★★V2 "The China Syndrome" (1979, Drama) Jack Lemmon. 1
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Chip-Dale
Amazing
Animals
Animal
"Land Before Time II: Great Valley" |Movie: “Ewoks: The Battle for Endor"® Sitters jFlash jTorkelsons
Ready-Not
Inside Out
Goof Troop | “Harry-Hendrsn"
HBO
Little Lulu
Hero
Movie: “The Truth About Cats and Dogs"|Movie: "Runaway" (1984) Tom Selleck. ‘PG-13’ |Movie: ★★★ “And the Band Played On" (1993) Matthew Modine. ®
Tracey
Movie: ★★% “Sidekicks" (1993) ‘PG’ ®
MAX
(7:45) Movie: ★★ “Steal Big, Steal Little" (1995) ®
Movie: ★★★ “The Notorious Landlady" (1962, Comedy)
Movie: ★★ “Three W/'shes”(1995) Patrick Swayze. ®
Movie: “Dreamrider” (1992, Drama)‘PG’
Movie: ★★V'2 “Permanent Record" (1988)
PASS
Tibubble 2
Outdoors | Paid Prog. | BowFlex II
Races-Hazel Park | Paid Prog.
Paid Prog.
U.S. 500
Auto Racing I Locker Rm
Tennis: ATP Infiniti Open -- Quarterfinals. (R)
Tennis (Live)
SHO
(7:00) Movie
Movie: “The Day the Earth Stood Still"
Movie: ★★ “Salt Water Moose" (1995)
My Life-Dog
GoodBurg
Movie: “Spill” (1996) Brian Bosworth. 'PG-13' I Movie: ★★★'/2 "Things Change" (1988)
“Dominick and Eugene" ® 1
TMC
(7:05) Movie
Movie: “Jack the Giant Killer” (1962) ‘G’
Movie: ★★V2 "High Spirits" (1988) Peter O’Toole.
Movie:**'/2 “Punchline” (1988) Sally Field. ’R’ ® |Movie:*** 1 /2 “Get Shorty" (1995) ’R’ ® | Movie: ★★★ "Mortal Thoughts" (1991) |
SATURDAY EVENING JULY 26, 1997 |
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30 11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
e
FOX
News
M*A*S‘H®
Two “No Man’s Land” (R)
(In Stereo)®
Access Hollywood (In
Stereo) ®
Cops
“Fresno" ®
Cops
“Seattle"®
America’s Most Wanted:
America Fights Back ®
News
Cheers ®
Mad TV (R) (In Stereo) ®
Tales From
the Crypt ®
Tales From
the Crypt ®
Hitchhiker
(In Stereo)
Hitchhiker I
(In Stereo) I
o
NBC
WNBA Basketball:
Rockers at Starzz
News
NBC Nightly
News ®
Wheel of
Fortune ®
Road to
Riches
Pretender “Unhappy
Landings” (In Stereo) ®
Movie: “Visitors of the Night" (1995) Markie Post. A
woman thinks her daughter may have alien origins. ®
News
Saturday Night Live (In Stereo) ®
Beach Patrol (R)
o
ABC
NFL Preseason Football:
Vikings vs. Seahawks
News
_
ABC Wld
News
Entertainment Tonight (In
Stereo) ®
Movie: ★★ "Love Potion No. 9" (1992) An experimental
serum works wonders for a shy biochemist. ®
Practice A 17-year-old is
tried for drug possession.
News
Movie: ★★% “Heart Condition" (1990) Bob Hoskins. A
racist cop receives a heart transplant from a black man.
“Deadly
Sun/eii."
o
CBC
(4:00) Major League Baseball: Kansas City Royals at I
Toronto Blue Jays. From the SkyDome. (Live) ®
Saturday
Report ®
Golf: Export A Skins Game -- First Day. From Whistler, B.C. ®
Saturday-
News
Movie: “The Private Life of Henry VIII" (1933) A portrait
of the 16th-century monarch and his many wives.
(Off Air)
©
WB
Baywatch “Let the Games
Begin” (R) (In Stereo) ®
FIX: The Series
“Quicksilver” (R)
Babylon 5 “Moments of
Transition” (In Stereo) ®
Hercules: The Legendary I
Journeys (In Stereo) ®
Xena: Warrior Princess |
“A Day in the Life” (R) ®
Outer Limits “Afterlife” (In
Stereo)®
Poltergeist: The Legacy
"The 13th Generation”®
Psi-Factor: Chronicles of |
the Paranormal (R) ®
Paid
Program
Home
Videos
©
UPN
(4:00) Movie
Simpsons
(In Stereo)
Step by
Step®
To Be Announced
News
Home
Improve.
Viper “MiG-89” (R) (In
Stereo) ®
Movie: ★★★ “American Hot Wax” (1978) Tim Mclntire. 1
DJ Alan Freed tries to stage a live rock ’n’ roll show.
©
PBS
Victory
Garden ®
Historic
Trails
Lawrence Welk Show:
Cavalcade of Music
Nova “Rafting Through the
Grand Canyon” (In Stereo)
Grand Canyon Flood! (In
Stereo) ®
Alien Empire (R) (In
Stereo) (Part 1 of 3) ®
World of National
Geographic ®
Sessions at West 54th (In
Stereo)
On Tour (In Stereo)
Nova “Rafting Through the
Grand Canyon” (In Stereo)
©
CBS
PGA Golf: Greater
Hartford Open
Paid
Program
CBS News
Baywatch Nights “The
Creature” (R)
Dr. Quinn, Medicine
Woman “The Dam” (R) ®
Early Edition “Psychic"
(R) (In Stereo) ®
Walker, Texas Ranger
“Days Past" (In Stereo) ®
Cape "Buried in Peace"
(R) (In Stereo) ®
Soul Train (R) (In Stereo)
Baywatch Nights “The
Creature" (R)
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
America's Castles
"Return to Newport” (R)
Home Again
151
Home Again
(51
Mysteries of the Bible
“Noah and the Flood” (R)
Biography This Week
Movie: ★★★ “The Bishop's Wife" (1947, Fantasy) Cary
Grant. An angel lends a hand in funding a new church.
Investigative Reports Holocaust survivors try to
recover their wealth from Swiss banks.
Science of Star Trek (R)
Biography This Week (R)
Investigative Reports (R)
AMC
Movie: ★★★ “The Wrong Wan” (1956, Drama) Fact-
based account of an innocent musician's robbery trial.
Remember
WENN®
Movie: "Desk Set” (1957) An efficiency
expert and a TV executive lock horns.
Movie: ★★★V2 “Winchester ’73" (1950) James Stewart.
A cowboy is determined to retrieve his stolen rifle.
Remember
WENN®
Movie: ★★★
“Desk Set"
BET
Rap City Top 10
Teen Summit
Benson Hit List
Comicview |Comicview
Paid Prog. |Paid Prog. Caribbean Rhythms (R)
Midnight Love
DISC
Bomb Detectives (R)
Discover Magazine
“Aircrashes” (R)
Loch Ness Discovered
151
Wild Discovery
“Scorpions" (R)
Firepower 2000: “The
High Tech Battlefield" (R)
Justice Files "Why They
l!L151_
New Detectives “Mind
Hunters” (R)
Wild Discovery
“Scorpions" (R)
Firepower 2000: "The
High Tech Battlefield” (R)
ESPN
Tour De
France
Senior PGA Golf: Franklin Quest
Championship -- Second Round. (Live)
Sports-
center
Pro Football Hall of Fame
Induction Ceremonies
Major League Soccer: New England Revolution at
Kansas City Wizards. From Arrowhead Stadium. (Live)
Baseball
Tonight
Sportscenter [
Arena Football: Teams to Be Announced.
FAM
Bonanza: The Lost
Episodes "Frenzy”
Movie: ★★★ "The Pistol: The Birth of a Legend" (1991)
The teen-age years of basketball pro Pete Maravich.
Movie: ★*'/2 “Rio Diablo" (1993, Western) A bounty
hunter helps a husband rescue his kidnapped wife.
Movie: ★★ "Desperado: The Outlaw Wars" (1989), Lise
Cutter Duell McCall helps a sheriff track down a killer.
Bordertown
Bordertown
Paid
Program
Paid
Program
LIFE
(4:00) Movie: “When No
One Would Listen" (1992)
Movie: “Fatal Vows: The Alexandra O'Hara Story"
(1994, Drama) Cynthia Gibb, John Stamps.
Movie: “Escape From Terror: The Teresa Stamper
Story”(1995, Drama) Maria Pitillo, Adam Storke.
Movie: “A Kiss to Die For" (1993) Tim Matheson. A
psychology professor is entangled in a murder case.
Girls’ Night Out Stand-up
comedy with Lainie Kazan.
Paid
Program
Paid
Program
NICK
You Afraid?
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Figure It
Out
Real
Monsters
Doug (In
Stereo) BE
Rugrats (In
Stereo) SB
Kenan &
Kel (R)
All That (R)
(In Stereo)
Shelby Woo
Kablam! (R)
(In Stereo)
I Love Lucy
Lucy and Desi Comedy
Hour
Happy Days
Taxi!
Dick Van
Dyke
Bob
Newhart
Newhart [
SCIFI
Mystery Science Theater 3000 (R)
Movie: ★ “Trancers 5: Sudden Deth"
Movie: ★★ "Scanner's”(1981, Horror) Jennifer O’Neill, Stephen Lack. [Mystery Science Theater 3000 (R)
Movie: “Scanners" ( 1981)
TBS
(4:05) Movie: ★★%
“Poison Ivy" (1992)
WCW Saturday Night!
Movie: ★★’/2 “Big Jake" (1971) John Wayne. An
estranged father returns to find his kidnapped grandson.
Movie: ★★★ "The Outlaw Josey Wales" (1976, Western) Clint Eastwood, Chief Dan
George, Sondra Locke. A Confederate soldier vows to avenge his family’s murder.
Movie: ★★★ “Hot Shots!"
(1991) Charlie Sheen.
TLC
Ancient Prophecies
Ancient Prophecies
How’d They Do That?
Operation (R)
|Human Experience
Painted Babies
Operation (R)
|Human Experience (R) Painted Babies (R)
TNT
Rudy &
G0G0
Bugs
Bunny
Flintstones
Bugs
Bunny
Kung Fu: The Legend
Continues
Movie: ★★★ “McLinlock!" (1963, Western) John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara, Stefanie
Powers. A cattle baron meets his match in a strong-willed woman.
Movie: ★’/2 "Skeeter” (1994, Horror) Tracy Griffith, Jim Youngs,
Charles Napier. Mutated mosquitoes terrorize a small desert town.
“Endan
gered^
USA
Movie: ★★★★ “The Godfather Saga" (1977, Drama) (Pari 1 of 2) Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, Robert De Niro. “The Godfather” and “The
Godfather, Part II” re-edited.
Movie: ★★★ “Cape Fear”( 1991, Suspense) Robert De Niro. An ex-
convict takes revenge on the lawyer who betrayed him. (In Stereo)!
Duckman
(In Stereo)
Movie: ★★★ "Halloween"
(1978) Jamie Lee Curtis.
DISN
(4:00) Movie: “Harry and
the Hendersons" (1987) I
Flash
Forward I
Torkelsons
(In Stereo)
Movie: ★★'/2 “Pee-wee’s Big Adventure"
(1985, Comedy) Pee-wee Herman. ‘PG’
Movie: ★% “Ernest Goes to Camp"
(1987, Comedy) Jim Varney. ‘PG’ [
Movie: ★*★ "Harry and the Hendersons" (1987) On a
camping trip, a family literally runs into Bigfoot. ‘PG’ [
Movie: ★★★ “The Barefoot Executive"
(1971, Comedy) Kurt Russell. ‘G’ I
“Life,
Liberty"
HBO
Sinbad’s Summer Jam 3: ’70s Soul Music Festival
Comic Sinbad hosts a musical celebration from Aruba.
Movie: ★★★ “The Truth About Cats and Dogs" (1996)
A radio host lies about her looks to a potential suitor.
Movie: "Hostile Waters" (1997, Drama)
Rutger Hauer (In Stereo) OB
Conspiracy
Theory
Oz “God’s Chillin’’ (R) (In
Stereo) SB
Movie: -tkV.2 "The Juror” (1996) Demi Moore. A hit
man is sent to sway a woman's vote in a murder trial.
MAX
Movie: ★★ “White Water Summer"
(1987, Drama) Kevin Bacon. ‘PG’
Movie: ★★'A "Coneheads”(1993,
Comedy) Dan Aykroyd. ‘PG’ [
Movie: ★★ “Rumpelstiltskin" (1995,
Horror) Kim Johnston Ulrich. 'R' ®
Man About
Town
Movie: “Marked Man” (1997, Suspense)
Roddy Piper. (In Stereo) ‘R’
Movie: "Blonde Heaven" (1995,
Suspense) Julie Strain. (In Stereo) 'R'
Movie: ★★ "Girl 6" (1996)
Theresa Randle. ‘R’ ®
PASS
Tennis: ATP Infiniti Open Bowling: Sunset Shootout
Sportsweek
Motorcycle Racing |Drag Racing: NHRA jSpeed
Tennis: ATP Infiniti Open - Semifinal. (Live)
Trackside
Championship Wrestling
SHO
(4:05) Movie: "Dominick
and Eugene" (1988) I
Movie: ★'/2 "Captain Nuke and the
Bomberboys”( 1995) Martin Sheen. ‘PG’
My Life as a
Dog®
Movie: ★★'/2 "Sfargafe”(1994, Science Fiction) Kurt Russell. An
artifact found in Egypt is the doorway to another world. ‘PG-13’
Movie: ★ “Bullet" (1997, Drama) Mickey
Rourke, Tupac Shakur. (In Stereo) ‘R*
Women-
Passion
Beverly
Hills
Movie: * “Lap Dancing"
(1995) Lorissa McComass.
TMC
(3:45) Movie
Movie: ★V2 “The Tie That Binds” (1995,
Suspense) Daryl Hannah. ‘R’ i
Movie: ★★ “Species" (1995) Ben Kingsley. A
genetically engineered creature may destroy mankind.
Movie: “Tales From a Parallel Universe:
Super Nova" (1997) Michael McManus.
Movie: ★★ “Gnaw: Food of the Gods II"
(1989, Science Fiction) Paul Coufos. ‘R’
Movie: ★ “Cyberzone" (1995) A bounty
hunter tracks four illegal female androids.
“Chain of
Command"
Shut Down f no,
f UNION
Motown ‘97 Vesting
CWA10CIL # 400B
From our Membership,
Executive Board, and Officers:
We Support The
Newspaper Workers!y
(JAW LOCAL #7
Region 1-D
tfllAWjR
Members stand in
Local 2151
Solidarity with the ‘
Members
Locked-Out Newspaper Workers.
Support Locked-Out fifUAWR
LOCAL #7 MEMBERSHIP
ISewspaper Workers
FRANK MASSEY - President
P.O. Box 136,
LENITA GAINES - Financial Sec.
Coopersville, MI 49404
LOCAL 2500
will continue to support our
fellow union brothers and sis
ters in their struggle withThe
Detroit News ana Free Press.
“We Stick Together”
SALLY EILEEN JOHN HENRY
BIER DAVIS JR.
PRESIDENT Financial
Secretary/Treasurer


JULY 20, 1997
PAGE 25
s definitely no lonely puppy
Dogg’
T he big backstage scuttlebutt
at Lollapalooza - which
stopped at Pine Knob for a
couple of days last week -
has been Snoop Doggy Dogg’s
security team. Seems the Dogg
Pound now includes eight security
guards, some from the Nation of
Islam, who patrol the crowds during
the show and keep a watchful eye
from the side of the stage. Seems
Snoop is fearful of an assassination
attempt along the lines of the
attacks on Tupac Shakur and the
Notorious B.I.G.
To be treasured
We’re still puzzling over that inad
vertently hilarious Jewish News
interview with new Detroit News
Publisher Mark Silverman. We
know there’s a Detroit orientation
given to new hires at the News and
Freep, but Silverman appears to
have skipped the sociology-of-
Detroit part. He said of the city of
Dearborn: “Arabs and Jews without
walls between them - it’s a trea
sure.” It sure would be ... if
Dearborn had Jewish residents in
any significant numbers.
Can’t forget
the Motor City
Remember “Motown 25,” the glit
tering early ’80s TV tribute to
Berry Gordy Jr. which featured
wfPtfk Between
the Lines
/ L i|l By Shirley Wilson
V and friends
Michael Jackson’s breakout perfor
mance of “Billie Jean,” as well as
that delicious Supremes catflght
when Diana Ross shoved Mary
Wilson out of the spotlight? They’re
back! DePasse Productions is work
ing on “Motown 40,” which would air
in ’98. We can only hope that
“Motown 40” includes some Detroit-
based stars, such as the Marvelettes,
who weren’t even invited to the pre
vious show.
Unfit to print
Loved that headline in the
Scabfreep Local News section
Thursday, over a story about the
rape of a woman in a Clarkston
nursing home: “Rape case lawyer
says suspects don’t fit.” Must have
been a busy day on the ol’ scab desk
for that one to get by, eh? Or a busy
week, or year.
‘Milenko’ rides again
No surprise here. Detroit’s Insane
Clown Posse is landing on its feet.
The rap group, whose album “The
Great Milenko” was pulled from
shelves by a politically correct
Disney Co., has switched from
Disney-owned Hollywood Records to
Island Records, which will re-release
“Milenko” in mid-August. Island will
also restore three songs that ICP
reluctantly took off the Hollywood
release - “Neden Game,” “Under the
Moon” and “Boogie Woogie Wu.” We
can only hope that since Island is
also U2’s label, and since the Irish
band has a taste for the bizarre -
and the controversial - it might lead
to an opening spot or two on U2’s
PopMart tour.
Kornacki bags Orlando
Popping up at the Oakland Press
is Steve Kornacki, a line-crosser
early in the strike who covered U-M
sports for the Freep, then fled to
Florida to write for the Orlando
Sentinel. Now he’s back to cover the
Lions for the ever-burgeoning
Oakland Press. We figure that’s at
least two pay cuts down from his
generous Freep salary.
How weird!
Desperation reared its ugly head
at Lollapalooza last week when radio
station K-Rock flew a banner around
that declared “Howard said Drew
sucks!” referring, of course, to rivals
Howard Stern, who mouths off
mornings on K-Rock, and Drew
Lane of WRIF’s Drew& Mike morn
ing show. Problem is, Detroit doesn’t
agree with Stern - at least not
according to the latest Arbitron rat
ings. In the Arbitron spring book
Drew & Mike are fourth with a 7.7
share of the market. Big-mouthed
Howard, meanwhile, sits at No. 20
with a 1.7 rating. Meanwhile, laugh
ing at them all is news station WWJ,
which pulls in more listeners than
any station in Detroit from 6 to 10 in
the morning, and R&B king WJLB,
which is tops in our market overall.
Is this a promotion?
The Scabnews is sending assistant
city editor Tarek Hamada on a road
trip - out to be chief of its Macomb
County bureau, to help shore up its
struggling Macomb County edition.
We’re not sure, but we think Hamada
might have qualified for the job
because he knows which county
Farmington Hills and Hazel Park fall
in - and it’s not Macomb. The News
confusedly sent out subscription
forms for its Macomb edition to
households in Farmington Hills and
H.P. ... On a general note, sources
inside both dailies tell us mid-level
management is fed up with under-
staffing and the scabs’ clumsy copy-
editing and bad reporting, and are
anxious to see their unionized staff
return.
Got good stuff for BTL? Fax Shirley
and the gang at 313-964-5554 or
e-mail 'em at detjourn@aol.com.
Memories of dad are ripe for the picking
B lueberries were our secret, my
dad’s and mine.
They were the fruit we
loved the best, and we loved
blueberries together quite often. No
one else in the family much cared for
them, but Dad and I could - and often
did - split a quart even-steven and
still wish for more. Sometimes we did
this on the q.t., early in the morning,
before anyone else was up. Sometimes
we indulged ourselves late on those
hot June nights, when blueberries had
just come in.
It seems like a lifetime of blueberry
memories are wrapped up with my
beloved father, you see.
Snapshot: It’s early in the morning,
after my late arrival home the night
before. My silver-haired father sits at
the kitchen table, a cup of steaming
coffee before him; a twinned mug,
fully milked and sugared, already
occupies my place. As I yawn and slide
into the chair, thanking him for the
coffee, he grins. “The blueberries are
in the colander in the sink, all washed
and ready to go,” he says. “I waited
until you got here before I got these. It
was hard to wait. But you’re worth it.”
Robin
Mather
Snapshot: My father and I
exchange hot, angry words (on a topic
long since forgotten). He storms out
the door and I stomp up to my room.
When he returns about an hour later,
I’m still furious at him - but not for
long. He produces a quart of blueber
ries from behind his back. “For you,”
he says. “I don’t like us to argue.” Not
only do I forgive him on the spot, but
never again do I muster that kind of
anger toward my father, wise in so
many ways.
Snapshot: Early in my brother’s ill
ness, when none of us knows or
understands what ails him or
whether he will ever be well again,
the tension becomes unbearable
around the house. “C’mon, Rob,” my
father whispers one morning, as he
wakes me up. “Let’s go pick some
blueberries and get out of here for a
while.” Pick blueberries we do, there
in the cool morning sunlight, with
birds flashing hither and yon. By the
time we return home, with quarts and
quarts of berries, there is no tension
left.
Just lately I have again been pick
ing blueberries. The cool spring and
plentiful rains have made for a fine
crop this year, and it’s easy to garner
a gallon of berries from a single bush
at the farm where I pick. Three gal
lons I’ve picked so far, with the likeli
hood of three more before the season
ends around the month’s close. Some
have been made into preserves, some
into whole-berry sauces for ice cream
and cakes, some into a blueberry cor
dial, and some, of course, frozen by the
quart for cobblers and crisps in the
winter.
As I pick, I think of my father, think
about the vagaries of life, think about
blessings and whether we recognize
them when they are bestowed on us.
Last year foul weather wiped out
the whole crop, and we had no blue
berries. This year, there’s a bumper
crop of blueberries. That’s a blessing -
and one I would never have known
without the even greater blessing of
my beloved father.
Blueberry fritters
V2 cup vegetable oil
1 cup flour
14/2 teaspoons baking powder
4 tablespoons sugar
V4 teaspoon salt
1 egg
V:s cup milk
1 cup blueberries, floured
Over medium heat, heat vegetable
oil in a large, heavy skillet until the
oil is hot but not smoking.
Mix flour, baking powder, sugar
and salt. Beat egg and milk together.
Fold egg mixture into dry ingredi
ents. Fold in blueberries.
Drop the batter by small spoonfuls
into the hot oil. Cook on one side
about four minutes, then turn. Cook
a moment longer, then lift out the
fritters to drain on paper towels.
After the fritters are drained, dust
them with granulated or powdered
sugar. Serve immediately
Makes 25-28 fritters.


PAGE 26
: :■ ' ' '
j I ill*? . t - ' mik : ^ t ‘1
JULY 20, 1997
Co*editors: Susan Watson, Norman Sinclair
Managing Editor: Peggy Spencer Castine
Published by Detroit Sunday Journal Inc.
450 W. Fort Detroit, Mich. 48226
313-964-5655 Fax: 313-964-5554
Web site: http://www.rustnet/~workers/strike.html
mP*k* Member Michigan Press Association
Member National Newspaper Association
Metro NY Labor Communications Council Communicator of the Year
Watercraft users
need tighter rules
M ichigan lawmakers are
debating whether to
impose statewide restric
tions on the use of per
sonal watercraft. The idea is long
overdue. Those fast, overgrown toys
that zip along the waves like snow
mobiles on steroids have become a
dangerous nuisance on Michigan
lakes and rivers since their introduc
tion several years ago.
Like a lot of problems, personal
watercraft probably started out as a
cute idea. Surely it would be fun to
enjoy the thrill and freedom of skip
ping over the waves on a sun-
streaked day. Indeed, the rush fueled
skyrocketing sales. They soon
became the best-selling category in
the boating industry.
Problems arose almost immediate
ly. The capacity for enjoyment was
exceeded only by the crafts’ capacity
to annoy others. Lakeside residents
who fear letting their children in the
water because the watercraft zoom
too close to shore know what we
mean. So do sailors whose tranquilli
ty - and safety - are in jeopardy by a
personal watercraft that pitches and
yaws past at dangerously high
speeds.
Here’s one telling statistic:
Personal watercraft make up only
about 5 percent of all registered
marine vessels, yet they figure in
nearly half of all boating accidents.
That alone is a glaring indication
that something is wrong. Michigan is
a state of boaters and vacationers,
twin activities that require courtesy
and common regard for the rights of
others. From widespread observa
tion, personal watercraft users often
display no such regard.
Defenders say their use is a per
sonal decision best left to the individ
ual. They argue further that public
waterways are open to all and that
critics are trying to hog all the best
spots for themselves. And that just
because one doesn’t indulge in an
activity doesn’t mean one can forbid
others to enjoy it.
Yet the high accident rate gives the
lie to such defenses. Personal water
craft are a perfect illustration of how
private pleasures can burden the
wider public. Just as society insists,
rightly, that auto passengers buckle
their seat belts, or that parents strap
their infants in child safety seats, so,
too, can society enforce some sanity
on public waterways.
As of now, there are virtually no
restrictions on these watercraft
except for some local rules that often
go unenforced. There are no age lim
its, nor does a user have to pass any
competency test similar to a driver’s
license exam.
True, there are some local speed
limits, and a drunken rider can be
subject to the same penalties as
other boaters caught operating
under the influence. But anyone who
spends time on Michigan waters
knows how often such rules are vio
lated with impunity. Indeed, the only
restrictions on watercraft often seem
to be the technical limits of their
engines.
We believe that regulation must
begin with licensing of operators.
This, in turn, must be granted only
after completion of a water-safety
course. This course could be modeled
on those offered by the various Power
Squadron organizations around the
nation, private groups that stress
common sense and courtesy in their
safe boating courses.
Once educated and licensed, users
who violate speed and safety restric
tions must be subject to penalties
harsh enough to deter such behavior
in the future. These restrictions
should include fines, revocation of
licenses and seizure of the watercraft
in extreme cases. Given the scope of
the problem, both the state and
municipalities ought to provide the
resources for such enforcement.
Society has learned that automo
biles can and should be regulated for
the greater public good. Personal
watercraft are too new to have
received such scrutiny up to now. But
even after just a few years, personal
watercraft have revealed such a
litany of problems that society
demands their use be restricted.
Dolores
fAlLUHTi/At
Congress sneers at culture
c
ulture is not the sole property
of the snob elite. Never has
been, never will be. Unfor
tunately, due to reasons that
are somewhat difficult for more rea
sonable minds to fathom, certain
elected leaders in the House of
Representatives can’t quite grasp
such a seemingly simple concept; art
and culture are for everyone.
Perhaps they need a little culture
themselves to unglue the eyes.
A little over a week ago, the House
voted to eliminate the National
Endowment for the Arts. The vote was
an embarrassingly close 217 to 216.
The decision not to preserve federal
support for culture, to not financially
recognize the importance of the arts in
the American community, was a deci
sion to replace the emphasis on cul
ture and the value of artistic pursuits
with an emphasis on cultural igno
rance and all attached values thereof.
As if to semi-atone for the error of
its ways, the House voted overwhelm
ingly against a measure proposed by
Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, the follow
ing week. By a vote of 328 to 96, the
$110 million budget of the National
Endowment for the Humanities was
saved. Among other things, the NEH
10-second editorial
The Free Press says that if
the federal courts order all
locked-out workers taken
back, it will keep all of its
scabs, even though that
means that there will be job
duplication in many areas.
Isn’t this the same paper
that railed against its unions
for featherbedding?
provides funding for museum
exhibits, as well as TV and radio pro
gramming. Chabot’s legislative rea
soning went as follows: “These (feder
al tax) dollars should not be taken out
of the pockets of hard-working taxpay
ers in this country and given basically
to academic elites to do with what
they want.”
For a nation as artistically rich and
globally influential as the United
States to be saddled with such a large
number of legislative leaders that
can’t comprehend the need to support
such a valuable commodity is, well,
embarrassing. Hopefully the Senate,
which still needs to cast its vote on the
issue, will exercise a broader, more
informed perspective on the matter.
The most recent push to eliminate
the NEA actually began nearly a
decade ago when Republican Sen.
Jesse Helms and his supporters decid
ed it was a waste of taxpayer money to
help fund artists such as Robert
Mapplethorpe, whose artwork was
controversial to say the least. Because
such artwork was deemed too offen
sive to be worth federal dollars by
Helms and his conservative crowd, the
next logical move as they saw it was to
wipe out federal funding for all the
artists. Just like that.
Some might equate such question-
, able reasoning with the decision to cut
off one’s entire foot just to get rid of an
irritating thorn. President Bill
Clinton has vowed to veto any piece of
legislation that would eliminate fund
ing for the NEA, which is much to his
credit. Still, it is disturbing to witness
such an influential yet fenced-in men
tality working so hard to corral the
rest of us.


JULY 20, 1997
PAGE 27
We long for the past to avoid the present
By Christopher M. Singer
"W" TT e are people of this generation, bred
% / in at least modest comfort, housed
m# m/ now in universities, looking uncom-
¥ ▼ fortably to a world we inherit.”
So began, in 1962, the “Port Huron Statement,” the
founding document of Students for a Democratic
Society. It was written in Ann Arbor by Tom Hayden,
an Irish Catholic from a General Motors family in
Royal Oak, and was adopted by the SDS meeting in
convention at a labor education center in Port
Huron.
“Looking uncomfortably to a world we inherit.”
That seems to be the USA’s latest theme song.
Alien invasions, government plots, government
plots to conceal alien invasions, white supremacist
gun fetishists rehearsing “Helter Skelter,” the
cigarette-smoking man, the CIA, AIDS, Ebola Zaire
virus, secondhand smoke from the cigarette-smoking
man plotting with global business bosses, the global
economy, global warming; there’s no shortage of fear
of the future. Or tranquilizers to take for it.
Alan Gerry, 68, listed by Fortune magazine as one
of the country’s 250 richest people, hopes to launch
his own brand of tranquilizer.
According to The New York Times, Gerry, who built
a business selling TV antennae into a cable TV
empire and then sold it to Time Warner last year for
$2.7 billion, has already purchased Max Yasgur’s
farm in Bethel, N.Y., and 40 surrounding properties.
You will recall 500,000 people gathered on
Yasgur’s farm Aug. 15-17, 1969, for what promoters
billed as an “Aquarian Exposition.” And just as GM’s
“Poletown plant” has never been in Poletown, the
Aquarian expo in Bethel has always been and still is
known as the “Woodstock festival.” Or by its generic
name, Woodstock.
Woodstock has come to recall visions of peace, love,
hope and faith, community, brown rice, running
around buck naked in public, rock ’n’ roll, smoking
reefer and sex in the streets.
Gerry has visions of his own for his land - a ’60s
counterculture theme park as big as and as authen
tic as Colonial Williamsburg.
“I want the site to exist in perpetuity so genera
tions will be able to come there and stand and expe
rience what earlier generations experienced,” Gerry
told the Times. “I want something that will appeal to
everybody, not just the yuppies who were there when
they were kids.
“Some people say they were a bunch of pot smok-
Bill Clinton has started a national discussion
on racism, including the prospect of apologizing or
“repairing” the wounds of slavery that black
Americans still suffer. As always when this topic
is raised, many whites exonerate themselves from
responsibility because it was so long ago and they
were not alive.
However, many of these same people are proud
patriots, readily identifying with what they con
sider the great achievements of American history,
no matter how long before they were born. They
certainly seem to think they have some special
inheriting relationship to the virtuous acts of
their ancestors. For example, they derive their
rights and those of their nation to this land from
the acts of their ancestors. They have no problem
ers and wore bandannas and bell-bottoms, but it’s
part of American culture, whether we like it or not.”
Whew. Far out. Back to Plum Street. Right on.
Local Chamber of Commerce types are talking up
the possibilities. Seems business has' slowed at the
area’s Catskills resort hotels and the most promis
ing scheme on the economic horizon until now has
been a Native American-run gambling. ... I mean,
gaming - sorry - casino at an old racetrack.
Our churches, temples and mosques long ago
became museums. We spend the
Sabbath at the mall now seeking
spiritual fulfillment from a garlic
roaster at Williams-Sonoma.
Detroit, the uncity, is an exhibi
tion of what happens when money
gets sucked out at the speed of a
mile a minute along outbound
freeways.
And, once again, Detroit is show
ing the rest of our nation its
future: The rest of our nation is
rapidly turning into one huge
museum as capital is removed
from it the way capital was
removed from Detroit.
We have become a race of shrine-
builders and museum patrons.
Entertain me. Hug me. Show me
that it used to be nice.
Our longing for a past we never
actually had led to our descent into
Reaganism. We knowingly elected
an actor because we knew he could deliver his lines
straight and tell us what we wanted to hear.
Now the Man from Hope is ushering in a wave of
nostalgia for tie-dyed shirts and the SANE bomber-
contained-in-a-circle peace sign.
At least we’re moving along to another generation.
I’m grateful for that.
Never understood ’50s nostalgia, anyway.
I attend hot rod and custom car shows. Inevitably,
I will be admiring some innovative styling detail on
a car and another spectator will walk up and indig
nantly sniff: “That’s not the way we did it in the
’50s!” as if he had just discovered a vandal painting
a mustache on a statue of the Virgin. To which I
inevitably reply: ‘Yeah? So?”
Why enshrine an era of rigid conformity, social
oppression and Pat Boone and Connie Francis?
Some fun. Like coolsville, daddy-o.
seeing a connection between today, the living gen
eration, and everything they like about America’s
past.
Patriotism is a double-edged sword. Just as
today’s Americans are proud to be the heirs of
their history’s accomplishments, so they bear the
responsibilities of their ancestors’ crimes, includ
ing especially the historic crime of the enslave
ment of Africans. The sins of the fathers are visit
ed upon the sons unto many generations.
Charles Brown
Detroit
My Aunt Nouritza from Chagrin Falls once wrote
my mother a letter warning that “Chris is becoming
a nonconformist.” In the ’50s, parents would rather
hear their kid is a serial killer than a nonconformist.
What’s always been interesting about ’50s nostal
gia is that we all spent so much of our time back
then looking toward the future, we couldn’t even
wait for the future to arrive. Chrysler Corp.’s ad shop
advertised the 1957 Plymouth by declaring:
“Suddenly it’s 1960.”
General Electric’s corporate
spokesman, Ronald Reagan,
promised us an engineered future
in which the global conglomerates
would improve the lives of
everyone who could afford it by
selling us everything decent that
real Americans would want.
The World War II generation,
having gone through the Great
Depression and global war, bought
the corporate campaigns that
insisted the word “freedom” actual
ly means consuming mass quanti
ties of mass-produced consumer
goods.
It wasn’t supposed to turn out
the way it has. Everything was
supposed to be clearly understood.
There were supposed to be rules.
Boomers rebelled against the cer
tainty of an engineered future.
Boomers claimed that freedom
means the pursuit of happiness.
Which brings us back to Gerry’s counterculture
theme park.
The ’60s were not about Jimi Hendrix’s Strato-
caster. It was a spiritual odyssey. And that journey
was bitterly opposed by many from the World War II
generation. They elected Nixon to put a stop to all
the nonsense once and for all.
“Because I said so. That’s why.”
On May 8, 1970, four days after the massacre at
Kent State University, a Detroit police reservist and
gun fetishist named Arville Garland broke into a
home on Lincoln Street that was known as
Stonehead Manor. A gun in each hand, Garland
murdered his own daughter, Sandy Garland; a poet
named Scott Kabran who was Sandy’s boyfriend,
and two of their friends, Greg Walls and Tony Brown.
Their sin for which a loving father had to punish
them: They had dropped out of the death culture to
seek their own answers.
“Quit your crying or I’ll give you something to cry
about.”
I’m as nostalgic for that part of the ’60s as I am the
illusions of the ’50s. Where in the counterculture
theme park will the Stonehead Manor exhibit be? Or
the Black Panther Party Pavilion? Or the
Resurrection City Plaza?
I’ve spent half a century learning the hard way to
live in the here and now, one day at a time. Not in the
past. Not in the future.
Taking nostalgia tranquilizers isn’t going to keep
the future from getting here, anyway. Let’s build our
future.
The Port Huron Statement called for a “participa
tory democracy’ in which we - not a global conglom
erate or the politically correct Nanny State - would
make the basic decisions that affect our lives and
where “politics has the function of bringing people
out of isolation and into community.”
Stay away from the brown acid.
Chris Singer is a locked-out Detroit News reporter.
Patriotism is a double-edged sword
letters
Detroit is showing
the rest of our
nation its future:
The rest of our
nation is rapidly
turning into one
huge museum as
capital is
removed from it
the way capital
was removed
from Detroit.


PAGE 28 JULY 20, 1997
Entertainment
“Ascension (Don’t Ever Wonder),” “Sumthin’
Sumthin’ ” and a rendition of “Whenever
Wherever Whatever” from “MTV
Unplugged,” which debuts Tuesday.
“I get so stunned by all of it,” he says. “I
mean, I never thought any of this would
happen. I get letters and hear stories ...
about people who have gotten married and
people who have consummated relation
ships, all kinds of stuff. It’s amazing to me
that my little experience and my little
music that I put together in my room is in
some way igniting these emotions.
“I just feel such a weight of humility, I
guess. I felt that unworthy kind of weird
ness.”
Of West Indian-Puerto Rican descent,
Maxwell (who doesn’t reveal his real name),
was 3 years old when his father died. He
was raised in the rough east New York
neighborhood of Brooklyn and was by his
own telling a quiet, shy kid who was seldom
allowed out of the house by his protective
mother.
But he was stirred at 17 when a friend
lent him a small Casio keyboard to fiddle
with in his bedroom. The first time he sat
down with it, he played for eight hours -
without removing his backpack or jacket.
He’d found his calling.
Before long Maxwell was playing in the
New York club scene, attracting crowds via
tapes he had made and handed out to his
friends. The music came nonstop, little
See MAXWELL, Page 32
66 It’s amazing to me that my little
experience and my little music that I put
together in my room is in some way
igniting these emotions.??
- Maxwell
Head o
Lovers ju
Maxwell
By Gary Graff
Journal Music Writer
M axwell met his first baby
recently.
Well, not his baby. It’s
the child of a couple of his
fans who, er, conceived
while listening to the silky, between-the-
sheets music from his debut album,
“Urban Hang Suite.”
It kinda made him feel like Barry White,
he says. The best part: The baby’s middle
name is Maxwell.
‘Yeah, I received a letter and a picture,
and it blew my mind,” says the 24-year-old
performer, who wrote and produced
“Urban Hang Suite” by himself. “Even say
ing it now, I’m getting all flustered inside.
I’m losing my cool for a minute.”
That’s OK, because “Urban Hang Suite”
- as well as the songs on Maxwell’s new
“MTV Unplugged” EP - is about losing
your cool to love. The album is a song cycle
inspired by a monogamous relationship, an
unusual subject in this age of hip-hop
debauchery.
“Urban Hang Suite” has been roundly
praised by critics and compared favorably
to the work of other R&B romantics such
as White and Marvin Gaye. It’s also hit a
chord with the public, selling more than a
million copies and launching hit singles
such as “ ’Til the Cops Come Knockin’,”
ERIC JOHNSON / Sony Music
Journal photo by GEORGE WALDMAN
Dessert on the grill? Why not! Directions for making grilled apples
and hazelnuts with oatmeal topping are on Page 24.
Light a fire under
your grilling routine
By Jeanne Norman Sarna
Journal Staff Writer
ith summer in full swing,
we have been grilling
everything. Or have we?
Some people tend to grill
the same few foods such as hot dogs,
burgers and steaks. These hints will
give you the techniques to expand
your grilling know-how.
■ Always preheat grill.
■ Start with a clean grill rack, free of
any burned-on food from previous
use. Wire brushes with scrapers
attached are available. Try storing
your, brush in or on the grill when not
in use so it’s always handy.
■ Brush clean grill with oil just prior
to grilling to minimize food sticking,
or brush food with oil (if food has
been marinated, it will have oil
already).
■ To get grid marks on food, place
See GRILLING, Page 29
>


JULY 20,
PAGE 29
1997
Grilled Apples and Hazelnuts with an Oatmeal Topping
1 cup whole, blanched and
skinned hazelnuts (filberts) or
substitute your favorite nuts
V4 cup butter
5 medium Granny Smith
apples, peeled, cored, seeded and
cut into slices
Dash salt
l U cup sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Dash nutmeg
Topping:
V2 cup quick-cooking oatmeal
l U cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons butter, cut into
small bits
Preheat grill. Place empty, large
cast-iron skillet on grill. To toast
hazelnuts, place in preheated skillet
and cover grill. Open grill and stir
once. Grill about 5 minutes (time may
vary depending on the freshness of
the nuts). Remove nuts from the grill;
set aside to cool. When cool, coarsely
chop nuts.
In the same skillet, add the butter
and melt. Meanwhile, in a large bowl,
toss the apple slices with the salt,
sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour
apple slices into skillet and toss in
butter. Cover grill and cook for 5 min
utes. While apples are cooking, in a
small bowl mix all the topping ingre
dients. Stir the chopped hazelnuts
a
Journal photo by GEORGE WALDMAN
into the apples and sprinkle with the
topping. Cover grill and cook for 6
minutes. Serve hot or at room tem
perature. For brunch serve with a
dollop of cream; serve as a side dish
with pork dishes, or with frozen
yogurt or ice cream. Serves 4 to 6.
Developed and tested by Jeanne
Norman Sarna, CFCS.
Add spark to grilling routine
GRILLING, From Page 28
food on preheated grill and don’t
move it for at least 2 minutes.
Moving food too soon can result in
overcooked food that isn’t browned or
doesn’t look as though it’s been
grilled.
■ Try grilling vegetables. They are
great tossed with a little oil and
placed in a grill basket. With its
i holes, a grill basket is perfect for all
those small items that would fall
through the grill grid.
■ When grilling chicken, thick burg
ers and meats in general, sear them
over high heat on all sides. Then take
them off the grill before you think
they are done and quickly cover
them. The meats will continue cook
ing during standing time, and the
natural juices will have been sealed
in by the searing, resulting in juicy,
tender meats and poultry. For a cover,
try using a large bowl inverted on a
tray or a dome cover from a pan. If
you have a large quantity, you can
place the meat in a soup pot with a
cover.
■ To avoid overly charred foods,
reduce flare-ups by using indirect
heat. This also will help control the
grill temperature. Place coals or wood
on the edges of the grill and place the
food in the center with a pan below
to collect the drippings. If using a gas
or electric grill, simply reduce the
setting.
■ Use tongs or a metal spatula to
turn food. Piercing with a fork tends
to have a drying effect because the
punctured food leaks natural juices.
Longer tongs are safer since they
keep hands farther from the heat
source. Have several pairs or wash
the tools with soap between uses.
Typically, tongs work well to rear
range coals (then wash), to place raw
food on grill (wash so bacteria is not
transferred to cooked foods), to turn
partially cooked food (then wash) and
to serve.
■ Use an instant-read thermometer
to check internal temperatures of
meat and poultry. Take care to not
hit the bone or fat pocket because
this will throw off the reading.
Meats: Rare = 115 to 120 degrees
Medium rare = 130 to 135
degrees
Medium = 140 to 145 degrees
Medium well = 150 to 155 degrees
Well-done = 160 to 170 degrees
Poultry to 165 degrees
■ Try grilling fruit for dessert. It is
fast and doesn’t heat up the kitchen,
and the subtle grilled flavor ends a
meal perfectly.
Local
*UAW
Jerry Sullivan
president along
with the leadership,
membership
retirees, sup
locked-out
newspaper
workers.
LOCAL 1250
City of Warren Employees
Send our Support to
STRUGGLING NEWSPAPER
WORKERS
Donald G. Smith
President - The
Executive Board, Staff
and membership of
Teamsters Local Union
No. 299
Supports the Newspaper Workers
in their labor dispute
AN INJURY TO ONE
IS AN INJURY TO ALL
UNITED FOR JUSTICE
LOCAL
tTAfy
372
TRENTON, MICH.
The Membership, Leadership
and Retirees of UAW Local 372
An injury
TO ONE IS
AN INJURY
TO ALL!
The members & officers of the
Transportation Communications
Union stand with the newspaper
workers in Detroit.
In Solidarity;
Robert A. Scardelletti
International President
U.A.W. LOCAL 155
STEPHEN P.YOKICH
LABOR CENTER
To The Lock
Newspaper
The membership officers &
executive board support our
locked out brothers
and sisters in their
struggle for a fair
settlement.
A Public Sector state
employee Local Union,
fighting Engler for the
ability to continue pro
viding services to the citizens of
Michigan, UAW Local 6000 sup
ports the newspaper workers in
their struggle for justice. ,
UIIUI
r
Walter R. Mabry
Executive Secretary-Treasurer
and the Membership of the
MICHIGAN REGIONAL COUNCIL
OF CARPENTERS
COU^c/
"hsosit^'l
Support
Detroit Newspaper Workers
in their labor dispute ^


PAGE 30
JULY 20, 1997
Journal
writers
at work
on books
There’s a slew of books
coming or already in your
local bookstores, written
by Sunday Journal
staffers.
Locked-out Free Press
reporter Steve Jones has
a new book out, the
“Michigan Travel Smart
Trip Planner” (John Muir
Publications, $14.95). Plus
this summer he’s working
as a poet-in-residence at
the Detroit public
libraries.
Locked-out News pop
music writer Susan
Whitall is putting the fin
ishing touches on her
tome, “The Women of
Motown,” for the Avon
imprint, to come out in
the fall of ’98. Locked-out
News investigative
reporter Norm Sinclair
is finishing his book based
on the strange death of
Gaylord’s Jerry Tobias.
Already in stores is the
Kirk Gibson autobiogra
phy “Bottom of the
Ninth,” co-written by
Lynn Henning, locked-
out News sports feature
writer.
Also in stores - and
coming out as well - is
“Voices of the Strike”
($25), with photos by
locked-out Freep photog
rapher George Wald-
man, accompanied by
words of locked-out work
ers. An updated edition is
in the works.
Locked-out Freep rock
writer Gary Graff has
just published “Music-
Hound Country: The
Essential Album Guide”
(Visible Ink Press,
$24.95), and he and
locked-out News TV writ
er Jim McFarlin are fin
ishing an R&B volume
that will be published this
fall. Graff’s “MusicHound”
book on rock was pub
lished last year.
An effort that belies the
“you get what you pay for”
adage is a free booklet
with 90-plus recipes, all
using Faygo pop. It’s the
work of locked-out Free
Press food writer Jeanne
Sama and will be avail
able in the fall.
going out
Customers brew up fund-raiser
By Audrey McKenna
Journal Staff Writer
T he patrons of House of Coffee
are sponsoring a weeklong
fund-raiser for their favorite
coffee grinders, Pat and Shelly
Ackerly, and their java hangout in St.
Clair Shores.
Open for two years, the House of
Coffee has offered not only loads of
dark coffee beans but also a place to
show off a poem or tune. Curtis Hertel
Jr., a regular, says times haven’t been
the greatest lately for the hangout, and
he’s afraid that without some patron
age, love and funds, the doors could
close for good.
This week’s schedule: Poetry Night at
8:30 Monday, $3 cover; the Portuguese
Rodeo Clowns (improvisational comedy)
at 8:30 Tuesday, $5; movies at 9 p.m.
Wednesday, $2; folk festival at 8:30
Thursday, $4; local band Frame (hard
rocking alternative) at 8:30 p.m. Friday,
$5; local band Dirtsquard (psycho folk
music) at 8:30 p.m Saturday, $5.
According to Hertel, the last event of
the fund-raising week will be a barbe
cue and auction at 3 next Sunday, fol
lowed by a celebration dance. “People
who helped during the week will get in
free; for others the cover is $5,” said
Hertel.
House of Coffee is at 22010 Harper
between Eight and Nine Mile. Call 313-
224-6898, or 313-885-9757 after 5.
Music
Fifth Avenue (no cover, unless otherwise
noted): Twistin Tarantulas, every Sun.;
Ghandee Dancer, every Mon.; the Reefermen
with Harmonica Shah and James Wailin,
every Tue.; Randy Violin and Sonic Blues,
Wed.; Harper, Thu., $4; Mudpuppy, Sat., 215
W. Fifth, Royal Oak, 248-542-9922 ... Red
Doggie Saloon: the Alligators, Sat., Milford,
248-685-2171 ... Fox & Hounds: Original Hits,
Mon.; George Bedard and the Kingpins, Tue.;
Lady Sunshine and the X Band, Wed.-Thu.;
Randy Volin and the Sonic Blues, Sat.,
Bloomfield Hills, 248-644-4800 ...
Roadrunner’s Raft: acoustic blues jam with
Bill Baud, tonight-Mon.; open mike, Wed.,
Hamtramck, 313-873-7238 ... Memphis
Smoke (Royal Oak): Moonpie Fontana,
tonight; ’70s “Time-Warp” party, Dr. Love’s
Disco Fever, Tue.; Willy Edwards Band, Wed.;
Mike Morgan & the Crawl, Thu.; Wailin’ Inc.,
Fri.-Sat., 248-543-4300 ... Saturday Night
Central: Worship with the Arts features jazz
saxophonist Beans Bowles, gospel pianist
Bobbi Thompson and poets, 5:30 p.m. every
Sat., Central United Methodist Church, 23 E.
Adams, at Grand Circus Park, 313-965-5422
... Library Sports Pub & Grill, shows begin at
10: John D. Lamb, Thu.; Righteous Willy, Fri.;
Garfield Blues Band, Sat., Novi, 810-349-9110
... Randy Volin and Sonic Blues, Fri., Stan’s
Dugout, Auburn Hills, 248-412-1040 ... Sports
Bar & Grill: Motor City Josh and the Big
Three, Fri.; Glen Eddy Band, Sat., Wyandotte,
313-285-5060 ... Moby Dicks: Yer Blues Jam
Session, Thu.; Curtis Sumter Project featuring
Cathy Davis, Sat., Dearborn, 313-581-3650 ...
Regular Boys, Sat., Memphis Smoke (West
Bloomfield), 248-855-3110 ... Soup Kitchen:
Lightnin’ Creole, Fri.; City Limits Blues Band,
Sat., Detroit, 313-259-2643 ... Coyote Club:
Dungbeetles, Thu.; the Civilians, Fri.; Shapes
between Us, Sat., Pontiac, 810-332-4695 ...
Jan Krist, 9:30 Wed., Royal Oak Brewery, 248-
544-1141 ... Old Woodward Grill: Jo
Serrapere, 8:30 Fri.; Pete (Big Dog) Fetters,
Sat., Birmingham, 810-642-9400 ... Dave
Edwards and the Look, Fri.-Sat., Walshs on
the Border, 20166 W. Warren, 313-441-6190.
Free summer music
Dearborn’s West Village District streetside
entertainment, noon-3 every Sat. through
Aug. 23; this week, experimental performers
at Too Too Oh/Mad Hatter, Eric Nordim Duet
at Commandant’s Quarters, Saltwater at the
Library and Monroe’s Boys Duet at the 222
Bldg. ... Troy Parks and Recreation and the
Troy Library concerts, 7 p.m. every Wed.; this
week: Ron Coden ... Music on the Plaza, 7
p.m. every Thu. at the comer of Kercheval
and St. Clair in Grosse Pointe; this week:
Teddy Harris Quintet ... Music in the Park, 7
p.m. every Thu., Dodge Park, Sterling
Heights; this week: Blackthorn.
Selected concerts
(Chene Park, 313-393-7827; Palace, Meadow
Brook and Pine Knob, 810-377-0100)
■ Poster Children, Number One Cup and
Aurora, 9:30 Wed., $6, Blind Pig, Ann Arbor.
■ The Fixx, 8 p.m. Wed., $20, 7th House,
Pontiac, 313-996-8742.
■ Bis with Kenickie, 7:30 Thu., $6, Magic
Stick, Detroit, 313-833-0120.
■ Legends of Motown: Temptations, Spinners
and Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, 7:30
tonight, $22.50 or $25, Pine Knob.
■ Lynyrd Skynyrd, Paul Rodgers and Corey
Stevens, 7 p.m. Tue., $12.50 or $24.50, Pine
Knob.
■ Vans Warped Tour ’97 with Social Distortion,
Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Pennywise, Hepcat,
Bouncing Souls, 1 p.m. Wed., $21.75, Pine
Knob.
■ Cosmo’s Factory featuring original members
of Creedence Clearwater Revival, 7:30 Thu.,
$12.50 or $18.50, Pine Knob.
■ The Who with Ryan Downe, 7:30 Fri., $22.50
or $45, Pine Knob.
■ Hank Williams Jr., Travis Tritt, Charlie
Daniels Band and Jo Dee Messina, 6 p.m.
Sat., $15 or $22.50, Pine Knob.
■ Shirley Caesar, Kirk Franklin, God’s
Property and Dottie Peoples, 8 p.m. Sat., $11,
Chene Park.
■Alison Krauss and Union Station, 8 p.m.
Thu., $12.50 or $22.50, Meadow Brook.
■ Bugs Bunny on Broadway, 8 p.m. Fri., $12.50
or $22.50, Meadow Brook.
■ UB40, 8 p.m. Sat., $18.50 or $25, Meadow
Brook.
■ Blackstreet, Mint Condition and Changing
Faces, 8 p.m. Sat., $28.50, Palace.
■ HORDE Festival with Neil Young, Primus,
Toad the Wet Sprocket, Morphine, Medeski
Martin and Wood, Ben Folds Five and more, 3
p.m. next Sun., $33, Pine Knob.
■ Electric Light Orchestra, Part II, “The 25
Light Year” tour, 8 p.m. next Sun., $12.50 or
$22.50, Meadow Brook.
Theater
Ron Allen and the Thick Knot Rhythm
Ensemble present “Ritual of a Dead Planet,”
7:30 Thu. and 8 Fri. and Aug. 1, Red Door
Theater, First Unitarian Universalist Church,
4605 Cass at Forest, 313-831-8976 ... Ridge-
dale Players will hold open auditions for the
nonmusical Neil Simon’s “Rumors,” 7:30 p.m.
July 28, Ridgedale’s Playhouse, 205 W. Long
Lake, Troy; roles for five men and five women,
readings from the script; show dates Sept. 19-
20, 25-28 and Oct. 3-5, 248-879-7402 ...
Purple Rose Theatre presents Michigan pre
miere of Joan Ackermann’s “Off the Map,”
through Aug. 10, Chelsea, $15-$20, 313-475-
7902 ... Second City: “Send in the Clones,” 8
p.m. Wed.-Thu. and Sun.; 8 and 10:30 p.m.
Fri.-Sat., $12-$19.50, 313-965-2222.
Films
“Ten for Two: the John Sinclair Freedom
Rally,” a concert film featuring John Lennon,
Yoko Ono, Bob Seger, Allen Ginsberg, Jerry
Rubin and more, a benefit for Direct Media
Zone, 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30), Fri., $10,
Michigan Theater, Ann Arbor ... “Romeo and
Juliet,” 9 p.m. (doors open at 8) Mon., $2,
State Theatre, Detroit, 313-961-5450 ...
Freedom Hill County Park Amphitheater, big-
screen movies on Tue. (action films) and Thu.
(family films), gates open at 7, movies begin at
dusk, Metro Parkway between Schoenherr
and Utica, Sterling Heights, $5, under 12 free,
parking $3, 810-979-7010.
Out & about
Chene Park (free, unless otherwise noted):
Senior Friendship Day, Tue.; Comedy in the
Park with T.P. Hearns, Teddy Carpenter and
more, 8 p.m. Fri. ... Mark Anthony, 9 p.m. Fri.-
Sat., Joey’s Comedy Club/Paisano’s, 5070
Schaefer, $6, 313-584-8885 ... Eleven Marbles,
an eight-person spontaneous comedy troupe,
every Thu. at 10:30 p.m., Mill Street Lounge,
Pontiac, 810-333-2362 ... Freedom Hill County
Park: flea markets, 7-4 every Wed.; German
American Volksfest, noon-11 today; Slovene
Polka Festival, 5-11 Fri.-Sat. and noon-11 next
Sun. ... Hart Plaza Detroit Riverfront
Festival: Afro-American festival, Wed.-next
Sun.
Art/design
Susanne Hilberry Gallery presents “slana-
dayne,” featuring works by Nadine Slowik,
Stephen Canaday and Susan Haynes, through
July 26, Birmingham, 248-642-8250 ...
Cranbrook Art Museum: Joe Crachiola is one
of several artists featured in Cranbrook Art
Museum’s exhibit “Far From Home: New
Definitions of Domestic Living,” through Aug.
31; “Location to be Announced: A Sample of
Club Culture Design, through Aug. 17; “New
Work by Cranbrook Academy of Art Artists,”
featuring the works of recent graduates,
through Aug. 31, 10-5 Wed., Fri.-Sat.; 10-9
Thu., noon-5 Sun., $4, Bloomfield Hills, 248-
645-323 ... Swords into Plowshares Peace
Center and Gallery offers a look at the works
of 20th-century Christian artist Georges
Rouault, through Oct. 10, 11-3 Tue., Thu. and
Sat., 33 E. Adams at Grand Circus Park, 313-
963-7575 ... Swann Gallery: “From the Earth,
through the Fire,” group ceramics show; also
works by Ken Hoffman (ceramics), Judy
Enright (acrylic paintings) and Ann
Hildebrandt (oil paintings), through next
Sun., 1250 Library St., Detroit, 313-965-4826
... Detroit Institute of Arts: Sol Lewitt Prints:
1970-1995,” through Aug. 24; “Splendors of
Ancient Egypt,” through next spring; “The
Pen is Mightier ... Islamic Calligraphy in the
DIA,” through next Sun., 11-4 Wed.-Fri., 11-5
weekends, 313-833-7900.
New on sale
Sinbad with Earth, Wind & Fire, Larry
Graham and Denise Williams, Aug. 21 at Pine
Knob, $30 pavilion, $18.50 lawn.
Please send “Going Out" items to The Detroit
Sunday Journal, 450 W. Fort, Detroit 48226.


JULY 20, 1997
PAGE 31
rating guide
O see it now § wait for the video
03 read a book instead
recent openings
just opened
Film gets us dancing, dreaming
Miramax Films
The foxtrot is an international language including Japanese in “Shall We Dance?"
“Contact” O Thanks to Jodie
Foster’s intense and high-minded per
formance, this adaptation of the late
Carl Sagan’s sci-fi novel of encounters
with aliens is one movie that plays to
our intelligence instead of trying to
pulp it. Rated PG. - Matt Black
“All Over Me” O This honest,
impressive coming-of-age story is set
in New York’s tough Hell’s Kitchen
neighborhood and follows young
women facing adult life and adult
choices. Rated R. - M. Black
“A Simple Wish” (not reviewed) Fan
tasy adventure about a 7-year-old girl
whose wish for a fairy godmother has
unexpected consequences. Rated PG.
still showing
O
“Austin Powers” PG-13. - William
Hanson
“Batman and Robin” PG-13.
- John Gallagher
“Brassed Off” R. - W.H.
“Buddy” PG.-M. Black
“Con Air” R. - Michelle Banks •
“The Devil’s Own” R.-J.G.
“Face/Off” R - M. Black
“The Fifth Element” PG-13. -J.G.
“Hercules” G. - Gary Graff
“Men in Black” PG-13 - M. Banks
“The 6th Man” PG-13. - M. Banks
“Temptress Moon” R. - M. Black
“Trial and Error” PG-13. - J.G.
“Ulee’s Gold” R. - W.H.
“Addicted to Love” R. - M. Black
“Anaconda” PG-13. - W.H.
“Breakdown” R. - M. Banks
“Jungle 2 Jungle” PG. - W.H.
“LiarLiar” PG-13. -M. Banks
“The Lost World: Jurassic Park”
PG-13. - M. Banks
“Love! Valour! Compassion!
- M. Black
“Murder at 1600” R.-J.G.
“My Best Friend’s Wedding” PG-
13. - W.H.
“Night Falls on Manhattan” R.
-J.G.
“Out to Sea” PG-13 - J.G.
“Romy & Michele’s High School
Reunion” R. - M.B.
“The Saint” PG-13. - J.G.
“Volcano” PG-13. - J.G:
“Wild America” PG. - J.G.
“Shall We Dance?” O
By John Gallagher
Journal Movie Critic
This delightful Japanese import
resembles none of the big action
movies of the summer. It’s neither
hilariously overproduced, like
“Batman and Robin,” nor grotesque
ly violent, like “Face/Off.”
What it is, quite simply, is a very
human story about a middle-aged
accountant, burdened by obligations
of work, family and marriage, who
takes the uncharacteristically bold
(for him) step of enrolling in a ball
room dance class.
Anyone who saw the genial
Australian film of a few years ago,
“Strictly Ballroom,” will be able to
guess the plot. Our accountant falls
not only for the rumba and the waltz
but also for his ethereally beautiful
dance instructor. These two and
their chastely sublimated romance
hold our interest in a sweetly senti
mental way throughout the film.
But the real star of the movie is
ballroom dancing itself - an art form
fully capable of inspiring its follow
ers with hope and possibilities. Even
in the hands of beginners - and our
accountant never rises much above
the level of earnest amateur - danc
ing allows its adherents to dream of
a life more gifted, more fluid, more
beautiful than our everyday exis
tence permits.
That’s what this film does for its
audience, too. It holds out the hope
of romance and beauty and making
the right choices, even as we battle
the tedium and defeats of life.
In a summer of ever louder special
effects, this quiet little movie makes
some of the sweetest sounds of all.
Rated PG.
“George of the Jungle” O
Disney’s new live-action “George of
the Jungle” is a larky surprise - a
sweet, zany, campy riff on the old
Jay Ward TV cartoon about a would-
be Tarzan hampered by klutz genes.
A buff Brendan Fraser gets the tone
just right as the wide-eyed, dim-wit
ted George, crashing into tree trunks
with upbeat verve. Leslie Mann is a
plus, too, as the San Francisco
socialite who falls for him.
But the animals steal the film,
“Speed 2: Cruise Control” PG-13.
- M. Banks
For metro-Detroif movie listings, call
810-77-FILMS or 313-88-FILIVIS.
especially the elephant that acts
like a puppy, with the help of some
seamlessly integrated computer
generated moves. Director Sam
Weisman deserves credit for the
expertly sustained tone of innocent
silliness.
Unheralded when the hypemeis-
ters swung into noisy action this
summer, “George of the Jungle” will
be around after many a more highly
touted entry has segued onto video.
G. - Matt Black
“Nothing to Lose” £0
“Nothing to Lose” wastes Martin
Lawrence and Tim Robbins as
reluctant interracial buddies thrown
together when Lawrence’s desperate
unemployed family man happens to
carjack Robbins on the very day
Robbins’ yuppie ad man is feeling
suicidal after catching his wife in
bed with his boss. In no time,
Robbins is flooring it from LA into
the desert and back again.
Lawrence alternates one-liners with
shrieks of terror until they decide to
better themselves by perpetrating a
caper against the guy responsible
for Robbins’ misery.
What they should have hijacked
was a few more ideas than Steve
Oedekerk’s underperforming script
allots them. “Nothing to Lose” has
almost nothing to offer. R. - M.
Black
“Operation Condor” O
“Operation Condor” isn’t the most
coming attractions
“Air Force One” - Harrison Ford
plays' the president as he faces terror
ists aboard the presidential jetliner.
“Mrs. Brown” - Well-received his-
sparkling of Jackie Chan’s bouncy
action ballets - but it doesn’t have to
be. Chan, who invents and executes
all his stunts, is miles beyond all
other action heroes combined.
Here he swoops and backflips and
somersaults his way into action nir
vana, needing nothing more than a
silly “Indiana Jones” plot steal as he
chases down a cache of buried Nazi
loot in the Sahara - but not before
hang gliding in and rolling out of an
Amazon jungle temple in a huge
plastic bubble before the opening
credits have finished.
A waterfront car chase, with Chan
on a motorbike riding rings around
five pursuing cars, jump-starts the
main story, which doesn’t stop until
a showdown against terrorists in a
giant wind tunnel.
“Operation Condor” is no more
weighed down by political correct
ness than by credibility. But Chan’s
beaming insouciance is as close as
film gets to guaranteeing a movie-
going high.
Don’t leave early; part of the fun is
watching the closing credits roll
against Chan’s outtakes of stunts
gone wrong, possibly to prove that
although his acrobatics are superhu
man, Chan is human after all. R.
- M. Black
“The Swan Princess: Escape
from Castle Mountain” (not
reviewed) A sequel to the original
“Swan Princess,” family fare for
those who don’t want to see “Her
cules” for a third or fourth time. G.
torical drama about Britain’s Queen
Victoria and her relationship with a
servant.
“Good Burger” - A teen comedy
based on Nickelodeon’s sketch “All
That” about two kids who run a ham
burger stand.


PAGE 32
JULY 20,
“"SoKS»
Local 223, Along with Thousands of Working People
Across the Country, Strongly Support the Heroic
Efforts of the Detroit Newspaper Workers and Their
Families. We Strongly believe in JUSTICE, FAIR
NESS, AND THE RIGHT OF A FREE PRESS.
[Klimist, Mcknight, Sale,
L McCLOW & Canzano, p.c.
Attorneys Representing
Labor Unions and Working People
We Support the Newspaper Workers
in Their Struggle
400 Galleria Officentre Suite 117
Southfield, Ml 48034, (810) 354-9650
COMMUNICATIONS WORKERS
OF AMERICA AFL-CIO
LOCAL 4250/5050
Steve
PRESIDENT
Supports Newspaper
Workers in their Struggle
IUOE
Local 324
and it’s members
“We support Detroit
newspaper workers
Sam T. Hart in their struggle for
Business Manager a fair contract.
]
U.A.W. LOCAL 36
WIXOM, MICHIGAN
MEMBERSHIP, LEADERSHIP AND
RETIREE WILL CONTINUE TO
SUPPORT THE NEWSPAPER
WORKERS AND THE
SUNDAY JOURNAL
JUSTICE, DIGNITY AND RESPECT
EVEN SMALL ADS GET
BIG ATTENTION
in The Detroit Sunday Journal
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FORMS-MAIL S
Lovers love Maxwell’s music
MAXWELL, From Page 28
bunches of songs he would group
together into thematic, conceptual
pieces. By the time Columbia Records
signed him in 1994, he had his choice
of a few albums he could have turned
into his debut.
“This record was not supposed to be
the first,” he says of “Urban Hang
Suite.” “It was supposed to be
Maxwell’s little
... whatever. I
have a lot of
things like
that, two or
three 12-song
things that are
just mine, that
I keep. This
was going to be
one of them,
but the wind
just said, ‘Put
this out.
Whatever you
do, put it out.’ ”
The most
striking fea
ture of “Urban
Hang Suite” is its sensitivity, a warm
empathy - particularly to feminine
emotions - that seldom comes from
male performers in the pop music
realm.
“But the guys,” Maxwell says, “I
didn’t know that so many guys shared
the same sensibility about romance
and the respect for women and all
that stuff. I thought it was just my lit
tle world in that instance. So it’s a
really good thing when you see guys
slow dancing with their women when
we do ‘Cops’ or something.”
That exploration also led Maxwell
to perform Kate Bush’s “This Woman’s
Work,” a gender-specific song that rep
resented a challenge for him to deliv
er.
“I was trying to put together a song
that represented my understanding,
“I didn’t know that so
many guys shared the
same sensibility about
romance and the respect
for women and all that
stuff.... So it’s a really
good thing when you see
guys slow dancing with
their women when we do
‘Cops’ or something.”
in some way of what women represent
and what they go through,” he
explains. “I think that’s what ‘This
Woman’s Work’ represented. I
couldn’t have written a song like that
because I’m not a woman, and an
exceptional woman wrote it already. I
just kind of took it.”
Maxwell says his second album is
already done, but “Urban Hang Suite”
is still on the ascent, so he’s not sure
when the follow-
up will come
out. He’s having
“oversaturation
nightmares,”
but he’s also
pleased that his
music is getting
over to a sub
stantial audi
ence.
And there are
perks to this
success,
although
Maxwell says
he’s still “blown
away from the
vibe that
women give me from the music and
the shows and stuff like that.”
In other words, he doesn’t have any
trouble getting a date. But the Roller-
blading, peanut butter Cap’n Crunch-
loving musician does fess up to feeling
the pressure of the expectations his
music creates when he takes some
body out.
“Yeah, sometimes I feel like I better
be, like, God-man, like I can just read
her mind or something,” he says with
a laugh. “But I just try to be straight
up, be me.
“I’m open to the fact that someone
could find me to be a jerk.”
Maxwell and Zhane perform at 7:30
p. m. Wednesday at the State Theatre,
2115 Woodward, downtown Detroit.
Tickets are $28.50 in advance, $32.50
day of show. Call 313-961-5450.
horoscope
Aries (March 21 - April 20)
An influential person may help you make
an important decision. A friend will ask for
help with a special project.
Taurus (April 21 - May 20)
It is necessary to stay calm in a stressful
work environment. You can’t let the competi
tion know it is getting to you.
Gemini (May 21 - June 20)
If you are unhappy in a love relationship, it
is time to do something about it. You must put
your emotional well-being at the top of your
priority list.
Cancer (June 21 - July 20)
Why do the smallest projects seem to turn
into major ordeals for you? Perhaps it is
because you like to do things the hard way.
Leo (July 21 - Aug. 21)
A co-worker or friend may be a jerk, but
don’t hold it against him. There is a good
chance he has big problems you know nothing
about.
Virgo (Aug. 22 - Sept. 22)
A romantic partner is waiting for you to
make the first move. A casual lunch or dinner
may turn out to be rather spectacular.
Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22)
Stop clinging to false hopes. You are
stronger than you think and you are capable
of so much more. Give yourself a break.
Scorpio (Oct. 23 - Nov. 22)
If you view life with a more positive atti
tude, good things will happen. An old friend
will remind you of an important promise.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23 - Dec. 20)
It is time to take a hard look at finances
and reorganize your obligations. A difficult sit
uation takes a turn for the better.
0 Capricorn (Dec. 21 - Jan. 19)
Details concerning legal or financial mat
ters should be looked at carefully. You need to
make a change in a difficult situation.
Aquarius (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18)
It is useless to worry about a situation you
can do nothing about. Use your energy to
work on something new a friend has proposed.
Pisces (Feb. 19 - March 20)
You will be amazed when you realize the
solution to your problem has been right in
front of you all this time.


JULY 20, 1997
PAGE 33
CALL
(313)964-5655
& CHARGE IT!
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1 Week: $ 1 00 per word.
2 Weeks: $ 2 00 per word.
3 Weeks: $ 3 00 per word.
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(10 WORD MINIMUM)
Obituaries
Mitchell Matlas, age 80, died July
17, 1997. Beloved husband of
Helen, father of Tom (Susan) and
Michael (Beverly). Grandfather to
Lisa (Fred) Menko and Laura (Kevin)
Meek. Former UAW Local 594
employee, OPIU member and Local
985 member and officer. Visitation
on Saturday, July 19, 4 p.m-9 p.m.
and Sunday, noon-9 p.m. at Wasik
Funeral Home, 13 Mile and Hoover.
Rosary, Sunday at 7 p.m. Funeral
mass Monday, July 21 at 10 a.m., St.
Sylvester Church, 12 Mile and
Hoover in Warren.
Nicholas J. Surma, age 55, of
Newport, Michigan, died July 14,
1997. Beloved husband of Patricia,
dearest father of Nick Surma, Jr. and
Christopher (Dawn) Surma, dear
brother of John and Walter. Also sur
vived by ten nieces and nephews.
Services were held Friday, July 18,
at the John K. Solosy Funeral Home,
Lincoln Park. Interment at Our Lady
of Hope.
NOTE ! The Detroit Sunday Journal reserves the right
to classify ads as we see fit. We also will change ads for
spelling and grammar as long as it does not change the
intent of the ad.
Announcements
15th Annual Printers’ Picnic
Sunday, August 17,
9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Stoney Creek Park, Utica
Beer, pop, hot dogs, and kielbasa.
Bring pot luck. Everyone invited
(except scabs)
Southfield Picket site Reunion.
Sooner than you think. Call Audrey,
(313) 331-7443
SUPPORT
STRAWBERRY WORKERS
United Farmworkers informational
meeting every Tuesday at 6 p.m.
Call (313) 841-9145.
Would you like to have a worker,
in the labor dispute talk about
the Newspaper Lock-out?
Our Speakers Bureau will send
someone to speak at any function,
large or small. For information or to
schedule a date, please call
(313) 965-2347, or weekends,
(810) 574-9539.
STANDING STRONG IN DETROIT
LARGE FULL COLOR POSTER
Documenting The Detroit News
paper Lock-out. All money benefits
locked-out families.
Unsigned poster -$15
Artist signed version -$25
Send checks to:
Metro Council of Newspaper Unions,
450 W. Fort St., Detroit, Ml 48226
Call: (313) 964-5655
(Speakers Bureau - 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.)
“500 DAYS”
Get your copy of the new CD!
Includes 3 new Labor Dispute
songs, 3 re-recorded songs (from
the “DNA Rag” cassette) and
13 Finland Station songs. Also
includes “War On The Workers” by
Anne Feeney.
$15 plus $2 shipping
Metro Council of
Newspaper Unions
2741 Trumbull, Detroit, Ml 48216
All proceeds go to support Detroit
Newspaper Workers in their fight for
a fair contract.
Anniversary
Happy Anniversary
Joe and Pat Sarnecky
Birthdays
Happy Birthday Sandy
you wild woman
^ from your wild sister **
Happy 21st Birthday,
Ryan!
Zielinski inches even closer to the
big 40! But that’s not too old to kick
some corporate butt.
Happy Birthday!!!!!
Happy Belated Birthday
Jewell Williams
(age unknown)
from the L.O. Headquarters staff
Happy Birthday
Joe Sarnecky
from friends at Preston Trucking
and family.
Prayers
Thank you, St. Jude, for answering
my prayers. Fran
Thank you, Guardian Angel, for sav
ing my life May 1, 1991 - Caroll.
Thank you, St. Jude, for favors
granted. Art B.
Publications - Booksellers
DETROIT BLUES MAGAZINE
This month: Boogie Woogie Red
Keepin’ the Blues Alive
in the Motor City.
Call (313) 872-BLUE(S)
Health
How to handle stress!
Send $2 and SASE to:
D. Traeder
P. O. Box 40734
Redford, Ml 48240-0734
“DEAD DOCTORS DON’T LIE”
T.J. Clark’s Original Mineral
Formula™. The only colloidal
mineral source being used by Dr.
Joel Wallach. Lowest prices!
Satisfaction guaranteed! Ask about
free delivery.
$19.95/qt., $60/gal.
Call Richard, (313) 584-7525
Help Wanted
Flight Attendants
with or without experience.
Send resume and photo to:
PWF
P.O. Box 53041, 340 Dorval Ave.
Dorval, Quebec, Canada H9S 5W4
Interviews will be held in your area.
JEFFREY J. ELLISON
Union-side labor, employment dis
crimination, workers’ compensation,
drug testing.
(313) 964-5600
NO SCABS PLEASE
Use the services
of the
Labor Friendly professionals
Listed Here
In The Detroit Sunday Journal
ELLIS BOAL
925 Ford Building, Detroit
(313) 962-2770
EllisBoal@aol.com
Bankruptcy
$195
Total Attorney Fee
(810) 398-5000
Former U.A.W. Attorney
Apprentice Bricklayers Wanted!
Requirements:
1.18 years or older.
2. 2 years of high school.
3. Resident of Wayne, Oakland,
Macomb and Monroe counties.
4. Valid driver’s license.
Application day first Wednesday
of each month. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
1627 W. Fort,
Detroit, Ml
For additional information, call
Bricklayers Training Center
(313) 965-1175
EEOC Employer
Executive Director
Christian Ministry
Prison Fellowships’s Detroit office
seeks Executive Director responsi
ble for fund development, PR, volun
teer recruitment, training and mgmt.
to support prisoner/ex-prisoner pro
grams. Requires 3-5 years mgmt.
experience, fundraising and/or mar
keting experience, strong organiza
tional skills, PC literate with cross-
cultural experience preferred.
Competitve salary/benefits. Send
cover/resume Nat’I office:
P.O. Box 17500,
Washington, DC 20041-0500
EOE
WAYNE COUNTY PURCHASING DIVISION
600 RANDOLPH STREET
DETROIT, MICHIGAN 48226
(313) 224-7796
INVITATION FOR BID
for
Purchase and Installation of
Communication Equipment into
Airport Emergency Response Vehicle
for
Wayne County Department of Airports
Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport
Airport Police Section
Romulus, Ml 48174
Bid Date: Monday, August 4,1997
Time: 2:00 P.M.
Control #97-37-242
INVITATION FOR BID
for
Replacement for New Fire Pump
and Controller
for
Wayne County Department of Airports
Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport
Willow Run Airport
Romulus, Ml 48174
Bid Date: Wednesday, August 13,1997
Time: 2:30 P.M.
Control #97-37-246
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
for
Beaubien Street Parking Facility
for
Wayne County Department of
Managment and Budget
600 Randolph Street
Detroit, Michigan 48226
Bid Date: Thursday, August 14,1997
Time: 4:00 P.M.
Control #97-37-251
PAUL H. STEVENSON
Attorney at Law
Criminal Defense, Personal Injury
4632 2nd Ave.
Call (313) 833-6868
Hassles at work? Call Lawyer
Jan Leventer — Before you
quit! Before you’re fired!
Discrimination, demotion, proba
tion, discharge, unfair workload,
harassment, etc. Former U.S.
Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission attorney, 20+ years
experience.
(248) 855-5200
Attorneys - Injury Claims - Criminal
and Divorce. Reasonable rates.
Authorized UAW referral attorneys.
Free consultations and home visits.
GATES and GATES
(810) 543-5990
Wanted: Freelance radio repair
person to fix vacuum tube amateur
radio equipment. The Radio Finder,
(313) 454-1890 or e-mail:
finder@radiofinder.com
CIVILIAN INVESTIGATOR
City of Detroit
Office of the Chief Investigator
Civilian Investigator must be a civil
ian serving at the Office of the Chief
Investigator. Degree required. Must
establish residency. Salary range is
$28,000-346,700; commensurate
with fringe benefits. Resume due no
later than August 11,1997. By mail:
CHIEF INVESTIGATOR
2111 WOODWARD 8th FLOOR
PALMS BUILDING
DETROIT, Ml 48201
Custom Clothier is looking for
experienced alteration specialist and
seamstress in men’s and ladies’
apparel. $7 per hour plus paid holi
days. Call Ron at (313) 925-0210.
Machinist, UTRON, Inc.
Manassas, Virginia seeking machin
ist with minimum 5 years experience
on mill and lathe. Send resume to:
8506 Wellington Rd.
Suite 200
■ Manassas, VA 20109
or call Dan (703) 369-5552
or fax (703) 369-5298
Multi-cultural Catholic Elementary
School in Southwest Detroit seeks to
fill the following positions.
Dedicated and certified teacher
for Grade 6.
Resource room teacher with
Special Education Endorsement.
School bus Driver with CDL-B
with P Endorsement.
For further information, please con
tact Sr. Elizabeth, Mon.-Fri. between
9 a.m.-12 noon at (313) 841-5230.
Machine Tool
pipefitters and electricians needed
A.S.A.P. Call M.G.W.
(810) 983-3950
INSIDE SALES
Manufactured housing parts dis
tributor seeking entry-level position
to telemarket current and new cus
tomers. Hourly plus commission.
Full time. Send resume to:
P.O. Box 84, Hazel Park, Ml 48030
Attn: Phyllis.
Delivery of Observer. Sfd. area.
Cash pay. Striker (810) 286-9678
Business Opportunities
Make a FORTUNE in Insurance!
Work in your spare time at home.
Call amazing recorded message
for complete details:
(313) 438-1504
Financial Independence for Life!
Secret banking system allows you
to work at home. Amazing recorded
message reveals details:
(313) 438-1461
Misc for Sale
SOLAR FLEX Includes leg attach
ment, weights and Roman pin.
Mint condition. Best offer call
(313) 491-5837.
NOTEBOOK COMPUTER. 486,
100 MHZ. 20 megs of RAM. Active
matrix screen. Windows 95.
Extras. 28000 PC modem. $1000
Mike. (313) 839-3103.
Vintage Slingenland Drum Set
four piece, cymbals, roto tom $450.
Call Bob (313) 676-8295.
Used pinball games, arcade
video games and juke boxes. Fun
for the home. (810) 566-1324,
Sterling Heights.
ZALLA’S WIDE SHOES
Men’s and Ladies’, Dress, Casual
and Tennis Shoes. Discount to
locked-out workers.
(313) 421-5610
GOOD AND PLENTY RESALE SHOP
Children’s clothing, women’s
full-figure fashions, dining room sets,
baby cribs, bedroom sets,
mattresses — twin to king
30 day layaway. $1.00 rack
22660 Van Dyke
3 blocks east of 9 Mile
(810)754-7310
White lace wedding dress, size 14.
Includes hoopskirt and headpiece.
$125. (313) 342-2329.
FULL SERVICE
Cable TV Descrambler, all makes
and models. (800) 652-2305
★ DESIGNER MUGS AND HATS ★
“No Scab Papers”
Available in red or black and red.
Or have your business card or
favorite photo — pets, cars or
loved ones — put on a designer
mug or hat. $9.50 includes, ship
ping, handling, and taxes. Send
requests to:
Bob’s Graphics and Design Co.
9319 Caprice,
Plymouth, Ml 48170
(313) 459-0635
Misc. Wanted
Wanted: The Radio Finder buys
used amateur radio equipment.
Estates or private individuals.
(313) 454-1890 or e-mail:
finder@radiofinder.com
web: www.radiofinder.com
What is your Senator doing about
the newspaper strike?
Carl Levin (810) 759-0477 or
(313) 226-6020
£f& Legal Services
The Wayne County Commission
Advertisement for applicants
for position of
AUDITOR GENERAL
The Wayne County Commission, our nation’s eighth largest county, with legislative oversight of a
$1.9 billion budget, is taking applications for the position of Auditor General. The successful can
didate for this position will be appointed by the Wayne County Commission for one ten (10) year
term.
Minimum Requirements
Must be a resident of Wayne County at time of appointment and for duration of appointment.
Appointee is not eligible for reappointment after completion of term.
Appointee shall not hold any other city, county, state or federal office during term.
Certified Public Accountant licensed by a State Board for at least five (5) years.
Preferred Qualifications:
Consideration may be given to applicants who lack advanced degrees or certification but
evidence strong background in accounting, public finance, operational or performance
auditing and/or governmental operations.
Alternatively a MPA, MBA, LLB, or J.D. with at least 5 years in governmental auditing.
Applicants should also have:
• Working knowledge of governmental accounting, finance and budgetary practices.
• Excellent writing and verbal skills.
• Extensive experience in municipal organization and public policy.
• Demonstrated management or supervisory experience.
Completed applications (Professional and Academic Vitaes) must be received not later than.
5:00 p.m. on July 31, 1997. A completed application must include a resume, and four (4) pro
fessional writing samples. A cover letter will not be considered as a professional writing sample.
Photo-static copies of advanced degrees or certifications must also be included.
Send completed application to: Victor L. Marsh, Director of Administration & Chief Operating Officer,
Wayne County Commission, 600 Randolph Street, Suite 458, Detroit, Michigan 48226.


PAGE 34
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Mixed Messages®
NOTE: The opinions expressed in Mixed
Messages are those ol advertisers and do not
necessarily reflect Sunday Journal policies.
FOUND - brown cloth camera case
at ACTION! Motown march. If you
want it call classified at (313) 964-5655
for more info. Found right in front of News.
Eric, you never fail to surprise me!
ǣǣ You're just too good to be true
Love you, Me
John Laird, You are the most gener
ous, caring and giving person I
know. I love you, man. Ann Marie
Randy-man, you should Chrissy run
those #$#@&*! bases. HA HA not so
much Wednesday. Vacations are too
great. Guess Who.
To the first-class picket fence crew:
Randy, Bob, Mike, Paul (and
Jimmy’s dirt-hauling service).
Thanks so much for the help, the
hard work, the friendship. It’s the
best gol darn union-made fence in
the whole gosh darn town.
See Susie Ellwood on TV sounding
almost conciliatory? Don’t buy it. The
companies have a plan. They’ll have
to take us back, but they don’t have
to bargain contracts — ever. We’ll be
under their dirty thumbs ‘til the day
we get back our rights. So this fight
just got tougher, sisters and broth
ers. The champagne stays on ice ‘til
we get contracts.
THERESA ROSE
Lily, Tulip, Violet, Daisy, Forget-me-not,
Begonia!
Get well soon, Love, Aunt Barb
and Uncle Bob
Truth and justice must prevail or
God help us all. Paul
Vietnam Veterans of America
Chapter 154
Thanks for your support!
Locked-out workers
Patronize Grace’s Place on Utica
Road, just south of 12 Mile
in Roseville.
Sarah — was that you and the toll-
booth guy listening to “Lisa’s
Father?
Belleville/New Boston Area
GET YOUR LAWN SIGNS
(313) 753-4033
' VW s ' -
JULY 20, 1997
CALL
[313)964-5655
& CHARGE IT!
VISA
- Ode to Tom Bray-
Hey Tom Bray, whaddya say
Got a little ticked off
About judgement day
That Bonior, he’s no corporate type
Got a cell phone though,
take a swipe!
-Biff
Gannett and Knight Ridder
have something to fear;
we have been standing strong now
for two whole years;
Let’s work together
c’mon c’mon,
let’s work together,
now now people;
and together we will stand
every good union woman and man.
After 2 years we are still around.
Please join the Wild Women.
Call Liz (313) 361-5382 or
Rosemary (810) 979-4456.
Biff and Mimi will award an all
expenses paid trip to Ohio with
Hack Wilson Midwest Memorial
Baseball Tour to the locked-out
Detroit Newspaper Guild member
who reclaims the editing job stolen
by scab Dennis Rosenblum. This
year’s tour includes a baseball
game in Hackron, hometown of
Chrissie Hynde and Devo, another
game in Canton, which is no longer
a part of China, a visit to the Rock
and Roll Hall of Fame, which
should be in Detroit but is in
Cleveland, pool privileges at the
Hackron Holiday Inn, the opportu
nity to watch two Biffs play
stratomatic baseball, an enchant
ing evening of bowling with Elvis,
enlightened commentary on
so-called “First World” culture and
the corrupting influences of latte
capitalism by Subcommandante
Marcos, a 4 a.m. prayer vigil with
the Imam, a historical treatise on
the origins of the sacred shard, the
poll position in the Hack Grand
Prix, a colorful t-shirt, and the
chance to get stupid. The Hack
starts on the evening of Friday,
August 22, and runs through
Sunday, August 24. Check out the
Hack website at:
http://www.rust.net/~cbrent/HAC
K.html/HACKONE.html for murky
details and lurid photos.
Thank Congressman David Bonior!
(810) 469-3232
Dear corporate drone Doron: The only
arrows we want many of you in upper
mis-Management, country club-corpo-
rate-Repub(boot)lickin’ land to “absorb”
are two well deserved deep and
painful ones, carefully aimed for your
left and right buttocks. And rightfully
so, one of them will hit you in the wal
let, for all the damage Goonett & Co.
have done to individuals, and to this
community. Not to mention the dam
age to their own
corporate image. (Wake up dummies!).
DRUG WAR IS OVER! If you want
it. All we need is LOVE.
Give PEACE a chance. Come
TOGETHER over me.
What is your Congresswoman
doing about the newspaper strike?
Lynn Rivers (313) 741-4210 or
(313) 722-1411
UAW Local 985 supports the
Locked-out Newspaper Workers in
their quest for a fair and decent
contract.
Carl Bantau, President
Al Przydzial, Vice-President
VEGA is his name - fined -
NOT jailed, NOT fired for
playing the insider game.
ATTENTION SUPPORTERS
Are you looking for lock-out items to
purchase? Are you looking for a
speaker on locked-out updates? We
can also help with lawn signs, even
in mass quantities. Refer to the sec
tion for the speakers bureau. Call
either number anytime.
(313) 965-2347 or (810)574-9539
DN: You’re guilty, so bargain now!
Get that scab paper out of town!!
The Tuxburys, UAW Locals 7,157,
and 227.
Brad Markel or Marckell or Markal
or whatever your name is; one
more and you’re habitual. This is
your first warning.
UAW 594 — We hope this is the
real thing! Solidarity, DSJ and all
locked-out workers.
For cool internet sites on
Action! Motown ’97 try —
http://www.uaw.org
with Real Video footage;
and with Real Audio
http://www.igc.apc.org/wbai-labor/
featuring locked-out workers
Susan Watson and Bob Ourlian!
GREATER DETROIT COMPUTER, ENGINEERING,
CAD DESIGNER AND SKILLED TRADES JOB FAIR
All software languages, hardware platforms, operating systems. ALL engineering disciplines &
technicians. Technical sales. Skilled trades.
Wednesday. July 23 ■ the Fairlane Club. Dearborn - 5000 Fairlane Woods Dr.,
Next to Ford’s Training and Development Center on Hubbard Dr. one mile W. of the Southfield
Freeway, Ford Rd. Exit off Southfield.
Thursday. July 24 - Management Ed. Ctr. of M.S.ll. - 811 West Square Lake
Road, Troy, Ml - 25 Acre Troy Campus, Exit 72-Crooks Road, exit off of I-75, right on Crooks, right
on Square Lake Road. . . _ __ _ _ _ _ .. _
11:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m., Both Days
Interview With; Boeing Aircraft - Seattle (many openings & eager to hire). Electronic Data
Systems, Compuware, Rapid Design Services, Longaberger Co. in OH, Clover Communications,
Frontier Telecommunications, Sentech Services, Senior Flexonics in IL, Spiral Int’l, Tech.
Engineering Consultants, ACRO Service, TRS Staffing Solutions, Charmille Technologies IL,
Graco Robotics, PMH Caramanning, Analytical Design Service - Ann Arbor, Add Staff, K-Byte
Electronics, CDI Information Services, Adecco, Engineering, Tech. Assoc., Parametric Technology,
Analysts Int’l. Stratasys Corp., Little Caesars and more.
OPEN BALLROOM • FREE ADMISSION • SMILE
Monday, October 20 Burton Manor, Livonia (Multi-Industry)
Fall Job Fair Tuesday, October 21 The Fairlane Club, Dearborn
Calander Wednesday, October 22 Mgmt. Ed Ctr. of MSU, Troy
Friday, October 24
Eberhard Center, Grand Rapids
^randJ/alle^tate^Univ^ownt^
M0 P\< O* M'CHIGAm
Call Chuck Vincent for
more information on
^ow your company can
sign-up to recruit.
f JOB FAIR NETWORK
OF MICHIGAN
10823 Melbourne
Allen Park, Ml 48101
(313) 381-0093 - Phone
(313) 381-0099 Fax
If unable to attend, FAX or mail RESUME
What is your Congresswoman
doing about the newspaper strike?
Debbie Stabenow (517) 545-2195
Grosse Pointers — Help support the
Locked-out Newspaper Workers!
Call our hotline at (313) 222-7654 for
information and yard signs.
U.A.W. Local 2093 -
The power of UNION is found in WE,
not ME. We support the newspaper
workers in their quest for a fair and
equitable contract. - Three Rivers
American Axle and Mfg. Facility.
GENE AUSTIN and JAN TUTOR
from UAW 594, support the
Locked-out Newspaper Workers and
594 strikers.
ATTENTION STRIKERS
We the members of
U.A.W. Local #247
support you and your struggle against
corporate greed. Your struggle is an
inspiration to all of organized labor.
The right to collective bargaining is as
important as our right to exist as free
people in this country. Your fight is our
fight. Keep up the excellent work in
the Journal!
’’The proper role of the press,”
Richard McCord argues, “is to
REPORT ethical, moral and legal
wrongdoing, not COMMIT it.” Get the
book now and find out what Gannett
thinks ‘freedom of the press” means.
Send $27.45 (made payable to Metro
Council of Newspaper Unions) to:
The Detroit Sunday Journal, 450 W.
Fort, Detroit, Ml 48226. Attn: Chain
Gang. Include name and address
you want it sent to. -The Chain
Gang, One Newspaper versus the
Gannett Empire.
The officers, members and retirees
of UAW Local 909 support the
Locked-out Newspaper Workers.
We encourage all working people to
continue not to purchase scab
papers or USA Today.
FREE LAWN SIGNS DELIVERED!
DOWNRIVER AREA.
(313) 284-1804
Erick Carne’s book of paintings
“Shorelines of the Great Lakes" is
finally available. Call Plymouth
Community Arts Council at
(313) 416-4278.
Real Estate
House for Sale - Metro Detroit
— Vernor/Junction area. 4-unit
house for sale. $65,000 cash. No
terms or land contracts.
— Michigan/Martin area. 4-bed
room, single home, needs little work.
$5000 cash. No terms or land con
tracts. Call (313) 554-4983.
House For Sale - Outstate
Move right in! Immaculate 2-year-
old ranch style home nestled into
many mature pines. 3+ acres. 3 bed
rooms, 1 3/4 baths, 2-car garage,
heated full basement, sunroom,
workshop, satellite dish, and much
more. In the heart of scenic northern
Michigan. Roscommon. $129,000
(517) 275-5522.
Multi-unit For Sale
Eastside Detroit — 9-unit apart
ment building, all 1-bedroom. Easy
land contract.
Call Ed, (313) 417-1928.
Real Estate for Rent
3 bedroom brick ranch; 1 1/2 baths;
full basement; 2 1/2 car garage;
central air; screened in patio. $875 -
plus security. Call (810) 792-6456
after 2 p.m.
MOM and POP DELI
Eastpointe. Great location.
(810) 445-3153
Detroit Academy of
Arts and Sciences
An Edison Partnership School
announces its search for the following positions for the
1997/98 school year:
Academy Director (Grades K-5)
Will assist the Principal in providing instructional, operational and adminis
trative leadership for the Detroit Acadmy of Arts and Sciences. Achieve the
Academy’s vision, create an effective team, and monitor the progress of
the Academy and staff performance. Academy Directors should have a
Master’s degree and at least six years of teaching and administrative
experience.
Lead Teachers (Grades K-5)
In addition to classroom teaching duties, the lead teacher will supervise
and mentor a team of four teachers, direct the development of new cur
riculum and create and maintain communication with parents, staff and
community. Lead teachers should have a minimum of five years success
ful teaching experience (including curriculum or professional development
leadership), and a Master’s degree, or be in the pursuit of it within five
years.
Classroom Teachers for Grades K-5 and Special Subject Teachers for
Grades K-5 (Art, Music, Spanish and Physical Education)
Plan and deliver effective instruction to students as a member of a “house”
team, in keeping with the Edison curriculum, school design, and technolo
gy plan. BA degree required, preferably in an area of academic concentra
tion. Successful teaching experience preferred but not required.
Special Education Teachers (Grades K-5)
Teacher consultants, hearing and speech impaired, learning disabled
and emotionally impaired.
Plan and provide effective service and instruction to students and work in
collaboration with members of “house" teams in keeping with Edison’s
responsible inclusion model. BA degree required, special education certifi
cation, successful teaching experience.
Substitute Teachers (Day-to-Day) (Grades K-5)
Tutors (Grades K-5)
Interested candidates are invited to submit a letter of interest and resume
to Schylbea Hopkins, Principal, The Detroit Academy of Arts and Sciences,
2751 East Jefferson Avenue, University Square Office, Suite 501, Detroit,
Ml 48207. For more information, please call (313) 877-9100.
Equal Opportunity Employer
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© 1997 by M. Reagle
Windmill Point Manor
Historic Building
943 Alter Road
Historic building under renova
tion, 1 and 2 bedroom units
some with terrace, gas inc.,
$400-$500 per month.
(313) 884-6778
Real Estate Agents
$ $ Cash for Homes $ $
Call Ed (313) 417-1928
Ralph Gammon
West Side Real festate Needs
(313) 937-2300 or (313) 325-8433
Free home warranty to
union members
Brother Locked-out Employee
Let me market your home and help
with all your Real Estate objectives.
Oakland, Macomb and East Side. Bob
Carroll of Jack Christenson Realtors.
Call (810) 826-8200
Pager (810) 704-1580
or Fax (810) 826-8210
BUYING OR SELLING A HOME?
Use a union brother, also a striking
employee specializing in Oakland and
Macomb counties and East Side Detroit.
Call Bob DeMoss, (810) 979-1600
Looking to buy or sell real estate?
Call union brother and locked-out
worker specializing in Metro Detroit.
Our company also specializes
in buying homes for cash. Call
Mr. Rose today. (313) 345-4660.
Hall for Rent
HALL FOR RENT
UAW #247 - 15 mile and Van Dyke
area. Call (810) 264-2945
Used Cars
Chrysler / Plymouth
1991 Dodge Caravan, 87k, V-6,
new tires. $4750 o.b.o. (248) 360-
2020. Evenings and weekends
(248) 360-0804.


JULY 20, 1997
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 35
1991 Plymouth Colt, am/fm
radio, auto, good condition. $1600
(810) 979-4456.
Ford
1991 Mustang GT 5.0
Convertible. Red. Like new. All
power. Only 31,000 miles. Asking
$10,500.
(313) 281-7664.
1991 Ford E-150 full size 1/2 ton
work van. Excellent condition.
65,000 miles. $7500.
(248) 879-1627.
GJVL
1995 Saturn SC2. All power,
am/fm cassette. Only 21,000
miles. Still under warranty. Asking
$11,500.
(313) 281-7664.
‘Imports’
1991 Volvo 240 wagon. 78,000
miles. 5-speed, new tires, original
owner. Excellent condition.
$10,500. (313) 884-9148.
Auto - Sales Reps.
Thinking of Buying
or Leasing a New or Used
Car or Truck?
Use a Locked-out Newspaper
Union brother. Call
Ray Frusciano
at Royal Oak Ford
(248) 544-6561
What is your Congressman doing
about the newspaper strike?
Dale Kildee (810) 373-9337 or
(800) 662-2685
Service Directory
Business Services
Gerald Baskerville and Co.
Accounting and Tax Service since
1942. At Livernois exit of I-75. We
cover all accounting needs for new
and old businesses. (313) 842-2336.
Fax (313) 842-2535.
COPY & ART
The Best in Words and Pictures
Experienced writers, editors, pho
tographers, graphic artists and
designers. (313) 927-0817.
HAROLD'S PRINTING SERVICE
Business Card Special
Two-color, raised type
business cards $45 per 1000
(313) 493-0177
Retired telephone man to help you
with all your telephone and modem
needs. I can save you some bucks.
Call John at (313) 320-7770 today.
Residential and commercial.
★ WEDDING INVITATIONS ★
All items discounted. Sampled
albums delivered. 20-album choice.
Call Agnes E. Johnson
(810) 588-3764
Maintenance & Repair
Baxter & Co.
Plumbing, electric, drywall,
painting, gutters and brickwork.
Call Donald Brintley at:
(313) 567-8408, (313) 934-8907
HANDYMAN — CPK SERVICES
Home repairs & maintenance
of all types, 16 years experience.
Call Chuck, (810) 773-9249
VINCE FURNARI CEMENT
Repair work or new construction
driveway, porches, patio sidewalks.
Call for a free estimate, licensed and
insured, eastside, some west.
(810) 465-5172
Vinyl siding and gutters, roofs,
houses and garages done by
locked-out workers. Call Steve,
(313) 441-2775
CLEANING SERVICES
Think spring, power washing and
deck restoration. Reserve a spot at
the top of our spring deck-cleaning
list and receive a 10% discount.
Westside, (313) 408-0685.
DECK LOOKING OLD?
Clean Sweep Power Washing
Makes any deck look new! Free
sealant. Excellent rates. Locked-out
worker. West Side. (313) 937-3609.
SUN CONSTRUCTION — Roofing
and vinyl siding, seamless gutters,
glass block windows, chimney
repair, work year-round emergency
service for roofs. Let us beat your
best bid. (810) 263-8218.
Sell your services in
The Journal!
DRYWALL large and small. Start to
finish repairs, insurance work, tex-
tured ceilings. Prompt and reason
able rates. Locked-out Newspaper
Worker. (517) 546-8576.
JT’s HANDY MAN SERVICE
One-stop spring cleanup
Painting and power washing, graffiti
removal, pool openings, gutter
and garage cleaning, etc. Free
estimates. (810) 791-4165.
Painting
^TTKTnAvTr^TDKTAT Bu Y Sell F ' nc * Tell it.
VJUJNDAY JUUKJNAL Advertise /f in the Sunday Journal!
$1.00 a word for 1 week *$2.00a word lor 2 weeks • $3.00 a word for 3 weeks *$3 a word for 4 weeks! (10 word minimum)
Date(s) you want your ad to run: Sunday,
Run ad for: □! Week □ 2 Weeks □ 3 Weeks □ 4 Weeks
INTERIOR PAINTING
Wallpaper hanging and stripping
Call for free estimates
(313) 584-4639
BUD’S PAINTING
Quality work at reasonable prices.
References available. Interior and
Exterior. (810) 977-2941.
A Painter, Not An Artist!
Quality interior painting. Also fences,
garages and porches. Affordable
and reliable. Good references. Call
(810) 754-8893.
Interior Painting by Mike D. Good
work, good rates. (313) 425-3414.
PAINTING - WOODY’S PAINT
& HANDYMAN SERVICES
Free estimates for many types
of home repair. Professional
indoor/outdoor painting. Locked-out
Newspaper Worker. (313) 941-1063.
Residential Painting
Interior and exterior. Reasonable
rates, free estimates. Gutter clean
ing. We clean garages! Andrew at
(313) 366-3938.
For the month of July:
.75/per word for
landscaping/home service ads!
Journal Ads Work!
TRUE CRAFTSMANSHIP
Painting
Residential and commercial. Fully
guaranteed. Mention this ad for 10%
off! (810) 566-6906.
GENERAL HANDYMAN
Interior and exterior painting and
woodwork. Drywall and painting.
Light plumbing and electrical. Very
experienced. Serving all of Metro
Detroit. Call Don (313) 841-0607.
Misc. Services
Bethy’s Place. Quality home day
care at an affordable price. Dorothy
Watkins (313) 843-8743.
Auto and Boat Detailing Wax and
Rub-Out. Call Joe, (313) 417-3389.
LOCKED-OUT WORKER
BUILDS LAWN BUILDINGS SHEDS
(Yardman Lawn Buildings) from
8’ x 8’ to 16’x 36’. Barn style or tra
ditional. (517) 223-4139, local
(313) 927-2648.
MORE VIDEO VIDEOGRAPHER
Specializing in weddings, Batmitz-
vahs, Barmitzvahs and any other
special occasions. Call: John at
(810) 979-2919.
The Final Touch
Specializing in wedding and all
occasion cakes and ice sculptures.
Call Pamela (810) 771-6246.
Misc. Services - “Adult”
TAWNY’S SECRET FANTASIES!
Exquisitely Erotic Conversation
Live, Personal, Unhurried
(248) 615-1300 Adults
$1.99 min. Credit Cards
(900) 993-8553 $3.99 min.
For good phone, call me at home.
Live/Hot/Open Conversation
18+ V/MC (248) 693-7224
Heading?: (Help Wanted, For Sale, Mixed Messages, Services etc.)
Exact wording of your ad:
(PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT CLEARLY)
Name
Address
City, State, Zip
Phone ( )
Paid by:
Amount enclosed: $ 2_
□ Check enclosed -or- Charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard
Credit Card No.: Expires:
Mail to: The Detroit_Sunday Journal^ 450_W_>_Detroi^,JMI 48226_
“Spacing Exploration” by Merl Reagle
7/20/97
p
p"
'Hr
m.' r
0 “
ACROSS
34 Toast start
66 Part of the
99
Marks from
36 Brit. ref. work
Panama
playing rough?
1 Toy that became
37 French dance
palindrome
101
reckoning
a chair
38 Rain cats and
68 Actor Elliott
104
Lady of the
8 It’s a Wonderful
dogs
69 Obi
house
Life kid
40 Ranch sound
71 “You look
105
Complaint
12 They get into
42 Grandparent,
mah-velous,”
106
Northern
habits
often
for example?
shorebird
16 It means “badly”
46 Negative review
74 Overtake
107
Lanka
19 Douglas of To
of Dracula!
78 Testifier’s words
109
Plants that draw
Die For
50 Easy Rider costar
80 Some contests
protests
20 Actress Moran
52 Hasten
81 Benevolent
111
Tale
21 Cheese party?
53 Integrity
83 Moody Blues hit,
113
“Watering hole”
23 Part of the new
54 A truly easy
“Go ”
116
A saint’s laugh
“Living in
choice, as pies
84 Obeisant
119
Big House
Manhattan”
go?
88 Youngster
120
Long time
Barbie?
58 Perk up
89 Dispenser candy
121
Flying prefix
25 Sex hormone,
59 Fall flat, as a joke
90 Grafton’s A
122
Rd. that leads to
for example?
61 The Dallas-
92 Artist Paul ...
Muscle Beach?
26 Shelley oeuvres
Denver Super
coming up in
124
What the cloud
27 out a victory
Bowl
ArtWorld
formation
28 Small marvel
62 Got juicier
magazine?
reminded Tonto
30 Quiver contents
63 “Aloha Oe”
95 Rich residences
of?
31 Born
accompaniment
97 Badly
128
Response to
32 Home in Toledo
64 Witnessed
98 Fry in butter
“O Hero”?
129 Hail
66
“Relax”
130 Uneven
67
The goddess of
131 Some advice
sports
132 Lee of baking
endorsements
133 Does a dog trick
70
Busy place
134 The Chapel
72
Separates
73
Lawyer Louis
DOWN
75
A Pointer sister
76
AA-approved
1 Plains beasts
77
Noted
2 Slip past
watchmakers
3 Seascape
79
Racket
playwright
82
It made the 280Z
4 What’s happening
84
Sharp downturn,
5 Shearing reaction
as on Wall Street
6 “Got jacks?”
85
First name in scat
“No, go fish”
86
Put your money
7 BILL-ionaire?
(on)
8 Farm hand before
87
Grade determiner
he becomes the
89
That skunk
Cowardly Lion
LePew
9 Fail or press
91
Want
ending
93
Whip the wheel
10 Good insult
94
Applications
11 Bobby of Indy
96
Rigel, for one
12 Slam-dunking
100
“How sweet
org.
!”
13 Minor
102
Tessie or Milo
14 Explosive stuff
103
Shows
15 Get mad
displeasure
16 Fe-LINE?
105
“Don’t make fun”
17 Sans editing
108
1932 film,//
18 ’80s Ford model
Million
22 Lord of the Rings
110
Skewered meat
character
112
Card bets
24 Giraffe’s relative
113
“ ever
29 The Lincoln, for
tasted!”
one
114
Yossarian
32 Lakeside
portrayer
dwellings
115
Rolls’s partner
33 Tons
116
Hawaiian city
34 Film Grant
117
Till stack
35 Electronics giant
118
Finished
37 Film porker
120
Decreases
39 Formerly
121
Body study:
41 Smell
abbr.
43 Word in
122
Turf
comparisons
123
Memorable time
44 Green land
125
Berle pearl
45 Demond’s costar
126
Bi- topper
46 Pretty good grade
127
Apr. abbr.
47 Actress Eleniak
48 Is wild about
49 Little Women star
50 Extras
51 Come up
55 Branches out
56 April VIP
57 Maligned but
ultra-useful plant
60 Death Valley’s
county
65 French schools
Solution on page 34
* VOL. 5 IS HERE!
To order any of Merl’s
crossword collections,
send $10 per book
(checks only, payable
to "PuzzleWorks") to:
Crosswords, P.O. Box
I5066-D, Tampa FL
33684. Please specify
Vol. 1,2, 3, 4, or 5.


PAGE 36
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
JULY 20, 1997
Toledo three make case for The Show
ADAMS, From Page 40
but he is 3-5 with a 5.24 ERA since moving
up to Toledo. He has 69 strikeouts - and 60
walks - in 79 innings. But he had 10 strike
outs and no walks in seven innings in his last
outing, a 6-2 loss to Norfolk.
“I’m going through a little funk,” Drum-
right said after a recent loss. “I need to get
ahead of more hitters. Hitters up here don’t
swing at pitches they can’t hit. The competi
tion’s older and there are a lot of guys here
with major-league experience.”
His fastball was clocked at 94 m.p.h. dur
ing a recent start and Baseball America said
he had the Southern League’s best curve in
1996, when he was 6-4 with a 3.97 ERA for
Jacksonville. Eventually, the Tigers see him
as their No. 2 starter behind Justin Thomp
son, but the timetable has been set back.
“He needs to get the ball down in the strike
zone better,” said Tigers General Manager
Randy Smith, in Toledo on a scouting trip.
“He needs to be more consistent with his
change-up. When you’re a two-pitch guy,
you’re gonna get hit and as big as his curve
breaks, he’s not throwing it consistently for
strikes. This is his first full year as a pitcher
and he needs to gain more experience.”
Drumright agrees, since a shoulder injury
sidelined him for the final three months of
last season.
“So far my pro career has not been
smooth,” Drumright said. “I’ve had to learn
how to deal with quite a bit of adversity. The
fact that I’m healthy is more important than
anybody knows.”
Bubba Trammell
Thomas Bubba Trammell, 25, hit better
than .300 in spring training. He hit .239 in
Detroit with four homers and nine RBI, but
playing time was hard to come by, so he was
sent down in May.
The 6-2, 220-pound right-hander has found
his power stroke in Toledo with 15 home
runs, 47 RBI and a .275 average in 51 games
while playing in left and right field.
“He needed to play every day,” Smith said
of Trammell. “He was trying to do too much
in Detroit and he got into some bad habits.
Now he’s doing what he does best - using the
whole park and driving in runs.”
Trammell hasn’t had many setbacks. He
was the Tigers’ Minor League Player of the
Year in 1996 after combining for 34 home
runs, 99 RBI and a .316 average at Jackson
ville and Toledo. He then was named co-MVP
of the Arizona Fall League.
“It was kind of devastating,” Trammell said
of his demotion. “I want to be a big leaguer
but I’d rather be here playing than up there
sitting.
“My main problem was that every time I’d
get in, I’d try to do something to ensure that I
was going to be in the next day. It helps when
you know you’re going to be in every day.”
Frank Catalanatto
A 6-foot, 170-pound left-handed hitter,
Catalanatto, 23, hit a two-run home run and
a double and earned MVP honors in the
Triple-A All-Star Game two weeks ago. Mud
Hens fans have seen him compile a .320
average, 10 homers and 50 RBI in 94 games
while playing a solid second base.
He hit .298 with 17 homers and 67 RBI in
Jacksonville in 1996 but was left unprotected
in the Rule 5 draft. The As selected him, then
returned him to the Tigers’ system.
“I like the future of the Tigers and I’d like
to stay with them because I’ve gone through
the system,” Catalanatto said. “I was very
disappointed in the spring because I felt I
put up the numbers to merit being protected.
But it was a good experience for me to go to
my first big league camp. I know other teams
are watching me.”
He has advanced steadily through the
minors, but if he looks north, he sees Damion
Easley having a career year at second.
“His role in the big leagues will be to
bounce between second, third and the out
field,” Smith said. “He can help a major-
league team, and I hope it’s Detroit. You can
never have enough quality players.”
Trammell and Catalanatto should get
called up in September. It will take a little
longer for Drumright.
“I’d like to pitch in Detroit but I’m not
ready yet,” Drumright said. “It’s only an hour
away but it’s a lot farther than that. Some
people have lived their whole lives in Toledo
and have never been to Detroit.”
Bowman coming back as Wings coach, but Holland moves up to GM
HARRIS, From Page 40
caused the uncertainty in the organi
zation since the Stanley Cup victory
in early June.
Bowman said he started to recon
sider his decision about a week after
he had talked to Ilitch.
“I was starting to think about what
I would do if I didn’t coach,” said
Bowman. “I didn’t like the alterna
tive. I didn’t think I was ready for
retirement.
“My problem has never been with a
contract or a money issue.”
“I guess I would say a general man
ager works with his coach,” said
Holland. “It doesn’t matter who the
coach is. When you have a coach with
the wealth of hockey experience he
has it’s even more so.”
With Bowman in the fold, not coin
cidentally, it also appeared the Wings
and Igor Larionov were heading
toward agreement on a deal which
would keep the unrestricted free
agent in Detroit.
The Wings had offered him a three-
year deal worth $4.5 million. But
Larionov and agent Don Baizley
balked after Florida signed unre
stricted free agent Dave Gagner to a
three-year deal for $6.9 million.
Larionov had also maintained
Bowman’s return would go a long
way toward ensuring the return of
the veteran center. With Bowman
signed, Larionov’s return semed even
more likely.
Vancouver has also been interested
but .Larionov, 36, said his top priorit}'
was remaining with the Red Wings.
“We’re getting closer and hopefully
we’ll be done in a couple of days,”
Larionov said after Thursday night’s
premiere of the “Hockeytown: Detroit
Red Wings 1996-97 Championship
Season” video, at the Fox Theatre.
In the unlikely event things fall
through with Larionov, the Wings
have been presented with an inter
esting Plan B, although it’ll cost them
more money.
Rangers’ unrestricted free agent
Mark Messier is upset with the
Rangers because he feels it’s not a
priority for them to sign him. He said
he’d shop his services to other teams
and early this past week, the Wings
got a call from Messier’s father Doug,
who acts as his son’s agent.
Messier made $6 million last sea
son and was offended by a one-year
offer from the Rangers for less than
$4 million.
It’s an intriguing scenario for
Detroit but probably not possible.
Messier would be a good addition but
it’s not likely the team would want to
add another salary in the $4-5 mil
lion range.
Steve Yzerman and Brendan
Shanahan are under contract to
make more than $4 million and
Sergei Fedorov, a restricted free
agent, made more than $4 million
last season and is expected to sign
again for at least that much.
“Certainly when it comes to Mark
Messier, a lot of teams are interested,
us included” said Holland. “But in
this day and age, you have to run a
team within a budget. With what
we’re doing, it would be difficult to
add a player like Mark Messier.
“Because of salary, even though he
would add a lot to our club or any
club for that matter, our first priority
remains to sign Igor Larionov.”
.
Journal photo by REBECCA COOK
Frank Catalanatto is an All-Star in Toledo, but he might be a utilityman in Detroit.


JULY 20, 1997
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 37
couch potato time
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Golf, British Open, final
round, Channel 7.
1 p.m. Auto racing, NASCAR Pennsyl
vania 500, TBS.
1:30 p.m. Auto racing, CART Molson
Indy Toronto, Channel 9. At 3 p.m.
on Channel 7.
2:15 p.m. Baseball, Colorado at Chi
cago Cubs, WGN.
4 p.m. Golf, LPGA Big Apple Classic,
final round, Channel 4.
4 p.m. CBS Sports Show, Beach soc
cer: United States vs. Brazil, Chan
nel 62.
4 p.m. Horse racing, Sunset Handicap
and Emerald Handicap, ESPN.
4 p.m. Tennis, ATP Legg Mason Clas
sic, final, PASS.
5 p.m. Cycling, Tour de France, Chan
nel 7.
5 p.m. Boxing, Bernard Hopkins vs.
Glen Johnson for IBF middleweight
title, 12 rounds, Channel 62.
5 p.m. Golf, Burnet Seniors Classic,
final round, ESPN.
8 p.m. Baseball, New York Yankees at
Milwaukee, ESPN.
MONDAY
1 p.m. Baseball, Los Angeles at Atlan
ta, TBS.
7 p.m. Baseball, Chicago White Sox at
Detroit, PASS, WGN, FX.
8:30 p.m. WNBA, Phoenix at Sacra
mento, ESPN.
TUESDAY
1 p.m. Baseball, Atlanta at Chicago
Cubs, doubleheader, TBS, WGN.
7 p.m. Baseball, Chicago White Sox at
Detroit, PASS, WGN.
WEDNESDAY
2:15 p.m. Baseball, Atlanta at Chica
go Cubs, TBS, WGN.
7:30 p.m. Baseball, Seattle at Cleve
land, ESPN.
10:30 p.m. Baseball, New York Mets
at Los Angeles, ESPN.
THURSDAY
10 a.m. Golf, Seniors British Open,
first round, ESPN.
4 p.m. Golf, PGA Greater Hartford
Open, first round, ESPN.
9 p.m. Baseball, Chicago Cubs at Co
lorado, WGN.
FRIDAY
10 a.m. Golf, Seniors British Open,
second round, ESPN.
Noon Golf, USGA Junior National
Championship, third round and
quarterfinals, ESPN.
2 p.m. Golf, Seniors Franklin Quest
Championship, first round, ESPN.
4 p.m. Golf, PGA Greater Hartford
Open, second round, ESPN.
7 p.m. Baseball, Milwaukee at
Detroit, PASS.
7:30 p.m. Baseball, Atlanta at Cincin
nati, TBS.
8:30 p.m. Boxing, Orlando Canizales
vs. Edwin Santana, featherweights,
12 rounds, ESPN.
9 p.m. Baseball, Chicago Cubs at Co
lorado, WGN.
9 p.m. WNBA, Los Angeles at Phoe
nix, Lifetime.
10:30 p.m. Tennis, ATP Infiniti Open,
quarterfinals, PASS.
SATURDAY
12:30 p.m. Auto racing, ARCA Media
One 200, ESPN. From Michigan
Speedway.
1 p.m. Baseball, Texas at Chicago
White Sox, Channel 2.
1 p.m. Golf, Seniors British Open,
third round, Channel 7.
1 p.m. Auto racing, Grand National
Inaugural Gateway Race, Channel
62.
2:30 p.m. NFL, Hall of Fame Game:
Minnesota vs. Seattle, Channel 7.
2:30 p.m. Golf, USGA Junior National
Championship, semifinals and final,
ESPN.
4 p.m. WNBA, Cleveland at Utah,
Channel 4.
4 p.m. Baseball, Kansas City at
Toronto, Channel 9.
4 p.m. Golf, PGA Greater Hartford
Open, third round, Channel 62.
4 p.m. Tennis, ATP Infiniti Open,
semifinals, PASS. Another semifinal
at 10:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m. Golf, Seniors Franklin
Quest Championship, second round,
ESPN.
7:30 p.m. NFL, Hall of Fame Induc
tion, ESPN.
8 p.m. Baseball, Chicago Cubs at Co
lorado, WGN.
8:30 p.m. Soccer, New England at
Kansas City, ESPN.
Sunday wrap
Looking ahead
Sun.
Mon.
Tue.
Wed.
Thu.
Fri.
Sat.
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
ft
TEX.
8:05
None
CHI.
7:05
PASS
CHI.
7:05
PASS
CHI.
1:05
None
MIL.
7:05
PASS
MIL.
7.-05
None
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
MIL.
1:05
PASS
CHI.
8:05
50
CHI.
2:05
None
TOR
7:05
PASS
TOR.
7:05
PASS
TOR
7:05
None
Home games are shaded
ll|i
V " ' •• •: . ’ ’ . ' x:. '
Secretary Miller shipshape sailor
AMERICAN LEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East
W
L
Pet.
GB East
W
L
Pet.
GB
Baltimore
57
35
.620
- Atlanta
61
34
.642
-
New York
54
39
.581
314 Florida
55
38
.591
5
Toronto
44
47
.484
1214 New York
52
42
.553
8X
DETROIT
43
50
.462
1414 Montreal
51
42
.548
9
Boston
42
52
.447
16 Philadelphia
27
65
.293
3214
Central
W
L
Pet.
GB Central
W
L
Pet.
GB
Cleveland
50
38
.568
- Houston
48
48
.500
-
Chicago
47
46
.505
514 Pittsburgh
47
47
.500
-
Milwaukee
43
47
.478
8 St. Louis
45
49
.479
2
Minnesota
41
52
.441
1114 Cincinnati
42
51
.452
41i
Kansas City
37
53
.411
14 Chicago
39
56
.411
8X
West
W
L
Pet.
GB West
W
L
Pet.
GB
Seattle
53
42
.558
- San Francisco
54
41
.568
-
Anaheim
52
42
.552
14 Los Angeles
50
45
526
4
Texas
46
47
.495
6 San Diego
44
51
.463
10
Oakland
40
57
.412
14 Colorado
44
52
.458
m
Batter
G
AB R
H 2B
3B
HR
RBI SB
AVG.
Fryman
88
336 58
98 17
3
14
58
9
.292
Hamelin
53
152 22
43 6
0
10
27
1
.283
Casanova
56
169 20
47 8
1
4
12
0
.278
Nevin
48
119 17
33 11
0
4
20
0
.277
Clark
92
330 64
91 16
2
23
77
1
.276
Higginson
81
289 51
79 15
1
15
55
8
.273
Easley
86
297 60
80 21
1
14
35
18
.269
Nieves
84
269 39
70 16
1
15
51
1
.260
Hunter
94
382 65
99 14
4
4
34
48
.259
Miller
23
59 9
15 4
0
2
7
1
.254
Walbeck
14
40 5
10 2
0
1
5
2
.250
Pride
63
142 21
32 3
4
2
18
6
.225
Cruz
83
238 22
51 15
0
1
22
3
.214
Reed
43
99 6
19 2
0
0
6
3
.192
Totals
94
3151 486
821 158
19
115
457 104
.261
Pitcher
W
L ERA
Sv IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Thompson*
8
6 2.95
0 128.1
102
45
42
45
91
Jones
2
3 3.02
15 41.2
36
19
14
29
40
Moehler
6
8 4.30
0 113.0
118
59
54
38
63
Blair
8
4 4.44
0 81.0
92
41
40
31
37
Brocail
1
4 4.66
2 46.1
52
24
24
21
28
Olivares
5
6 4.70
0 115.0
110
68
60
53
74
Sager
2
2 4.86
3 50.0
52
30
27
12
31
Myers
0
4 5.29
2 32.1
30
20
19
17
30
Lira
5
7 5.77
0 92.0
101
61
59
45
64
Miceli
2
1 6.00
1 45.0
45
33
30
25
40
Bautista
2
2 6.41
0 39.1
51
30
28
12
18
Jarvis
0
1 10.98
0 19.2
37
26
24
9
13
Totals
44
50 4.68
22 832.0
852
476
433
359
539
Through Friday, ‘disabled list. Totals include players no longer with team.
Tigers get fresh arms in trade
It was a good bet that the Tigers would make a
deal before the July 31 trade deadline. But few fig
ured the Tigers would use pitchers as bait.
The Tigers sent starting right-handed pitchers
Felipe Lira and Omar Olivares to Seattle on Friday
night for right-handers Scott Sanders and Dean
Crow, along with minor league third baseman
Carlos Villalobos.
Sanders, 28, will start today in Texas. He was 3-6
with a 6.47 ERA for the Mariners, who acquired
him in the off-season from San Diego. He was 9-5
with a 3.38 ERA for the Padres in 1996.
Crow, 24, was 4-2 with a 4.78 ERA and seven
saves for Triple-A Tacoma. He had 26 saves for
Double-A Portland in 1996. Villalobos-, 23, hit .341
with 11 homers and 53 RBI for Class A Lancaster.
“We are receiving two of the top arms from an
organization that is very deep in young pitching tal
ent,” said Tigers General Manager Randy Smith.
Olivares, 30, was 5-6 with a 4.70 ERA and will be
a free agent at the end of the season. Lira, 25, was
5-7 with a 5.77 ERA.
- Joe Adams
L ong before she became
involved in enforcing the
state’s license plate and boat
registration laws, Candice
Miller was a sailor.
“I’ve been sail
ing my whole life,”
said Michigan’s
Secretary of State,
who was aboard
Ricochet when it
left the starting
line Saturday in
Bay-view Yacht
Club’s 73rd Port Huron to Mackinac
Island yacht race. “My family was in
the marina business. I’ve been
around boats since I was a kid.”
This is Miller’s 21st Mac. She’ll
crew for Dennis Turner on the 40-foot
custom Ricochet which has won two
previous Macs, one under the late
Henry Burkard in 1976, and again
under Turner in 1987.
The fleet of 284 yachts left the
starting line in Port Huron Saturday.
The bulk of the boats, including
Ricochet, will sail the longer 259-nau-
tical mile course around Cove Island
Light off Tobermory, Ont., in northern
Lake Huron and then west to the fin
ish line at Mackinac Island. The rest
of the fleet, 109 yachts, will sail the
short course, a 204-nautical mile
jaunt up the Michigan shoreline.
The first boat could finish late
tonight or early Monday morning.
Miller, capable of handling any job
on the boat, was part of the first all
female crew to
sail in a Mackinac
race, in 1971.
“Actually, we
tried it in 1970
but we were
rejected because
we didn’t have an
able-bodied crew
(no men),” said
Miller, 42. “But they let us in the next
year. We finished in the middle of the
pack on a boat called Sayonara.
“The first night was a breeze. But
the next night, about four o’clock in
the morning. I kind of hit the wall.
You have to learn to pace yourself. In
my experience, the race is won or lost
on Sunday night.”
Miller’s father, Don Snider, is sail
ing in the race, as is her brother,
Gary, and brother-in-law, Dave
Askew. Miller’s father and brother
are both Bayview members.
“I’m an honorary member,” said
Miller, who says Bayview produces
some of the world’s best sailors.
“I remember Ted Turner came here
one year with his America’s Cup boat
to race in our ‘pond.’ He didn’t win
and he never came back,” she said.
-PAID ADVERTISEMENT-
Believe in Steve!
Steve Fisher, has been the U-M head basketball coach since 1989.
Steve has always stood for integrity and good sportsmanship as well as
athletic excellence. It’s time for us to say, “We Believe in Steve” on...
July 24, 6-8 p.m.
At the Double Tree Hotel in Novi,
across from the Twelve Oaks Mall.
MC: MORT CRIM
Sport Giveaways. U-M Highlight Footage.
U-M Alumni Cheerleaders. Live Music.
Great Food. Athletes Autographs.
Scheduled to appear: Travis Fryman, Gary
Danielson, Tim McCormick, Mark Hughes, Leo
Brown, Dugan Fife, Freddie Hunter, Antoine Joubert,
Rob Lytle, Melvm Nieves, Lary Sorensen, Garde
Thompson, Way man Britt, Detroit Tigers,
Detroit Red Wings, Detroit Lions, Detroit
Pistons & former U-M players.
Silent Auction
A few of the celebrity donors and the items
they’ve put on the block are listed below:
Sergi Federov - autographed hockey stick
President Gerald Ford - autographed golf putter
Ken Griffey, Jr. - autographed baseball
James Earl Jones - autographed Darth Vader Mask
Michael Jordan - autographed basketball
Glen Rice - autographed shoes
Monica Seles - autographed visor
Proceeds from the auction go to C.S. Mott Children’s
Hospital and Special Olympics.
Admission is free but space is limited. Call for ticket information, (313) 961-4930.


PAGE 38
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
JULY 20, 1997
Lions’ Ross a happy camper
By Joe Adams
Journal Sports Editor
It’s the first training camp for Bobby
Ross as Lions head coach but, as
usual, there’s more talk about who
isn’t in camp than who is. That’s espe
cially true when the man who isn’t in
camp is Barry Sanders.
Sanders and No. 1 draft pick Bryant
Westbrook were no-shows when camp
opened Friday at Saginaw Valley
State University. Sanders figures to be
in camp soon, since his agents,
Lamont Smith and David Ware, were
in Pontiac last week trying to close a
deal, The Lions have reportedly
offered Sanders, who turned 29 on
Wednesday, a five-year, $27.5-million
deal that includes an $11 million sign
ing bonus. He is in the last year of a
contract that pays him $4.2 million.
“We’re optimistic we’ll get some
thing done, the sooner the better,”
Lions Chief Operating Officer Chuck
Schmidt said. ‘We have every inten
tion of making him a Lion for the rest
of his career. I see no reason why he
wouldn’t have many productive years
ahead of him.”
Schmidt wasn’t as certain about
Westbrook, putting the onus on his
agent, Eugene Parker. The Lions have
reportedly offered the draft’s fifth pick
a six-year, $ 13.8-million deal, but
Parker also has Baltimore’s Peter
Boulware, the fourth pick, and Seat
tle’s Walter Jones, the No. 6 pick, as
clients. Schmidt says Parker is wait
ing to see what the market will bear.
“How his situation sits depends on
the players around him,” Schmidt said
of Westbrook. “His agent is using one
player to set the rate for the others.
How (Parker) does influences how
he’ll be able to recruit clients next
year. Our offer is substantially above
what the No. 5 pick got last year.”
Ross is in no mood to wait. He wants
to get started on his first camp as
Lions coach.
“The offseason preparation has gone
well,” Ross said last week. “The guys
appear to be in pretty good shape, but
I haven’t seen them in pads.”
Ross likes the look of his offense,
especially tight end David Sloan, who
is coming off knee surgery.
“Sloan looks ready to go,” Ross said.
“It looks like the rest he had since our
last minicamp has helped him. He
looks like he has the quickness he had
prior to being injured.”
There are question marks every
where on defense, but Ross isn’t sure
the Lions will pick up another defen
sive lineman to fill the void left when
Henry Thomas was waived.
“I think the defensive line will play
better than people expect,” Ross said.
“They’ve got to stay healthy, but they
can be a pretty good group. I like their
athleticism and I like their speed.”
r
Rally in support of
Fisher is premature
Journal photo by REBECCA COOK
Coach Bobby Ross is finally going to see
how his Lions look on the practice field.
Even if someone becomes available
that could help the Lions, salary-cap
constraints might prevent them from
making a move.
‘We’re very tight,” Schmidt said. “It
will be very difficult to maneuver from
here on out. We have some flexibility
in case we want to do something but
not as much as in the past.”
The Lions will train in Saginaw
until Aug. 7, the day before the Lions’
second exhibition game, against Cin
cinnati at the Silverdome. The presea
son opener is Aug. 1 against Atlanta.
x cli ivci aiou ncio uaitiiiiuic o ± ctci 1 a guuu x xxrx^ uxx^xx uj.mj.ctu. m tiic onvciuuinc. aiic pi cocci-
Boulware, the fourth pick, and Seat- athleticism and I like their speed.” son opener is Aug. 1 against Atlanta.
Steady Labonte passes Gordon in heated points duel
By Christopher M. Singer , . R on Capps, driving Don “The
By Christopher M. Singer
Journal Staff Writer
While the Rainbow Warriors have
been putting seven victories together
for their driver, Jeff Gordon, defending
NASCAR Winston Cup champion
Terry Labonte has been quietly piling
up points with consistent finishes.
Gordon’s poor finishes in the last
two races cost him the points lead and
allowed Labonte, who has 13 top-10
finishes in 14 races, to claim it.
He now leads Gordon by three
points, 2,497-2,494, going into today’s
Pennsylvania 500 at Pocono Raceway
(1:05 p.m., TBS).
Pocono is a deceptively tough place
to race. It’s like a 2.5-mile super
speedway. It’s also like a low banking
flat track and a road course, but it
isn’t any of those things.
It’s hard to set up a car for three
very different turns and two long,
wide high-speed straights. Pocono is
hard on gearboxes, clutches, brakes
and engines.
The technical advantages gained by
running multi-car teams is reflected
in the Winston Cup points.
Hendrick Motorsports teammates
Labonte and Gordon are 1-2 in
Chevrolet Monte Carlos. Roush
Racing’s Mark Martin and Jeff Burton
are 3-5 in Ford Thunderbirds.
Dale Earnhardt, still winless after
42 races, posted his second straight
runner-up finish last Sunday and sits
sixth in points in his Chevrolet Monte
Carlo. The GM Goodwrench Plus
team, under new crew chief Larry
McReynolds, is getting it together.
Never dismiss “The Intimidator” or
his chances for an eighth Winston Cup
points title.
Toronto on tap
Team Penske’s Paul Tracy contin
ues to lead the points battle in the
PPG CART World Series, but he might
not be on top after today’s Molson
Indy Toronto (3 p.m., Channel 7 and
1:30 p.m., Channel 9).
The Penske chassis excels on high
speed ovals in low downforce trim, but
seems to be lacking grip in high down
force trim on road circuits.
The 11-turn, 1-784-mile temporary
street circuit in Toronto winds around
Exhibition Place on the Lake Ontario
shoreline.
Alex “Zig-Zag” Zanardi is becom
ing one of the more exciting drivers to
watch in Indy car racing. In Cleveland
last Sunday, he won his second tempo
rary street circuit race of the season in
his Ganassi Racing Reynard-Honda
by just refusing to give up or lose.
Meanwhile, Tracy’s teammate, A1
Unser Jr., placed fourth in Cleveland,
his best finish of the season.
Reunion pays off
The NHRA Winston Drag Racing
series kicks off its annual grueling
western swing with the Mile-High
Nationals at Bandimere Speedway in
Denver. Live final-round coverage is
set for 6:30 p.m. on ESPN2.
Ron Capps, driving Don “The
Snake” Prudhomme’s Camaro, will
be looking to repeat his first Funny
Car victory, which came at the inau
gural Gateway race.
After hiring Tom Anderson away
from A1 Hoffman late last season to
serve as crew chief on his new Funny
Car operation, Prudhomme fired And
erson when Capps did not qualify for
several races and was eliminated in
the first round at those races where he
did make the field.
Prudhomme called on old friend and
mentor Roland Leong to replace
Anderson. Leong took Prudhomme on
his first national tour in 1965 driving
Leong’s “Hawaiian” Top Fuel dragster.
Prudhomme won the season-open
ing Winternationals and the U.S.
Nationals in Indianapolis driving the
“Hawaiian.” Reunited after more than
30 years, the new team quickly gave
Capps a winning car.
Force’s fiery Fourth
John Force, still without a win in
Funny Car since February, experi
enced more bad luck during a July 4
match race in at London Motorsports
Park in London, Ontario, Canada.
The supercharger on his Ford
Mustang exploded, causing a fire. The
fire burned off his parachutes, causing
him to run off the end of the drag strip
into the safety sand trap. The blaze
then caused Force’s fuel tank to
explode. Force was unhurt but the
race car was destroyed.
HENNING, From Page 40
If Fisher and his program are exon
erated by the university and by the
NCAA after Michigan presents its
findings to the NCAA next month, a
celebration for the beleaguered coach
would be understood and in order.
But what if things turn out other
wise? What if the internal findings
parallel newspaper accounts of
NCAA violations? What if a booster
has, in fact, been greasing players’
palms while Fisher has been account
able for his program’s cleanliness.
What if U-M gets hit with heavy
sanctions? What if Fisher, as often
happens when a school is slapped
with probation, gets fired?
Why would people be lining up to
participate in a public - an important
distinction there - demonstration of
support for a coach whose program
faces many charges and whose school
could pay a devastating price for
neglect that a head coach must, fun
damentally, be held accountable for?
Granted, Michigan has not yet
been tied to any infractions by either
U-M or by the NCAA. Neither has
Fisher - who is entitled to due
process - been convicted of anything.
But the investigation should be
allowed to play out before celebra
tions, or unbridled displays of sup
port, are awarded a head coach who,
together with his team, stands
accused amid heavy evidence of some
serious irresponsibility.
“Steve Fisher’s touched a lot of
lives,” said Michael Duggan, Wayne
County deputy executive and one of
the rally’s organizers.
Duggan said if charges against
Fisher are corroborated, then the
rally “is our embarrassment. It does
n’t change my confidence in the fact I
don’t think he did anything wrong.”
Fisher affects people in that way.
He has, for years, been one of the
genuinely pleasant people in college
sports. The quarrel here isn’t over
personality or citizenship.
The disagreement is that this rally
has an “Our Steve, Right-or-Wrong”
air to it. For all of Fisher’s personal
appeal, it seems there’s some ques
tionable judgment in showing sympa
thy to a person who, if serious find
ings are corroborated, was at the
switch during a period of misbehavior
that has no excuse or defense.
That, for now, is an “if.” No one is
saying what will happen until the U-
M findings, and the NCAA’s evalua
tion of them, are made public.
But if they do prove true - and
past experience in these investiga
tions suggests that U-M and Fisher
should indeed be fearful - there will
have been more constructive places
to have been on July 24 than at a
back-patting party for Steve Fisher.
This is serious stuff. Until the rul
ings have been made, any applause
for U-M’s basketball coach might bet
ter be delivered in private.


JULY 20, 1997
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 39
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ATTN:‘96-'97 College Grads.
*17,590
*98 WINDSTAR “GL” WAQON
• Driver tipping/slide seat
1 Speed control/tilt
1 GL 7 passenger buckets
1 Rear window defroster
■ Air Conditioning
■ Elec. AM/FM stereo/cass.
■ Pwr. windows/locks/mirrors
■ Bodyside molding
■ 3.8L SPI engine
4-spd. auto. O/D trans.
Floor mats
Deluxe wheel cover
Privacy glass
1 Remote entry
1 Cloth seats
1 4-wheel ABS
■ 3yr./36,000 mile warranty,
■ Front driver & pass, airbag
Stk. #80107
ATTN: ‘96-'97
College Grads.
*19,790‘
$1400 Factory Rebate
‘97 E150 “UNIVERSAL” VAN CONVERSION
4.6L EFI (V8) engine
• Elec. auto. O/D trans.
• RV converter trim
• Elec. AM/FM stereo w/cass.
• Passenger air bag
• Pwr. windows/door locks
• 3.55 ratio regular axle
• Cast alum, wheels
• Aux htr. A/C
• Speed control/tilt wheel
• Central air & heat
• Color TV w/remote control
• Rear power door lock
• Satin oak engine cover
• Rear AM/FM stereo cass.
w/headphones
• VCP w/remote control
• Pwr. tri-fold sofa
• Lighted valences
• Day shades
• 12 volt vacuum cleane
• First aid kit
• Six piece molded floor mats
• Tissue holder
• 3yr./36,000 mile warranty.
Stk. #75521
*23,290
full paint
leather trim
***24 month closed end non
maintenance lease w/12,000 mile
per year allowed. 15c per mile
penalty. Lessee has the option to
purchase the vehicle at lease end
at a price to be negotiated with
the dealer at lease inception.
However lessee has no obligation
to purchase the vehicle at lease
end. Lessee responsible for
excessive wear & tear. 6% use
tax due monthly. Rebates com
piled in price. *Plus tax & license.
Rebates and $1000 down pay
ment computed in price.
3480 JACKSON
AT WAGNER,
ANN ARBOR, Ml
1-94 EXIT #172, TURN LEFT
996-2300
ANN ARBOR
Hime mm
MUSTANG, COBRA, COUPES
AND CONVERTIBLES,
CONTOUR SVTS
Expedition—4.6 and 5.4 V8’*,
XLTs and Eddie Bouers
‘97 CONTOUR “GL SPORT’’
Pref. Equip. Pkg. 236A, full length console, AM/FM
stereo radio w/cass. man. control A/C, rear window
defroster, remote mirrors, Light Group, pwr. door
locks, front driver & pass, airbag, tachometer, 15"
unique alloy wheels, 2.0L DOHC 4 cyl. engine, 5-
spd. man. trans., remote keyless entry, pwr. side
windows, 3 yr./36,000 mile warranty. ATTN: ‘96-’97
College Grads. Stk. #73640
$12,590’
$2,200
Factory Rebate
‘97 RANGER “4x4” STX SUPERCAB
4.0L EFI V6 engine, 5-spd. man. O/D
trans., Pref. Equip. Pkg. 857A, Luxury
Group, A/C, speed control/tilt, anti
theft, remote entry, pwr. window, lot
& mirrors, prem. elec.
AM/FM/cass./clock, STX Group, cast
alum, wheels, rear jump seat, fog lamps,
sliding rear window, cargo cover, front driver &
pass, airbag, pwr. steering, all-terrain tires, 3.73
ratio limited slip axle, 4920 GVWR, super engine
cooling, CD changer, 3 yr./36,000 mile warranty.
ATTN: ‘96-97 College Grads. Stk. #78052
$18,690’
$1,400
Factory Rebate
“96 F350 “4-DR” CREW CAB PICKUP
Power Stroke Turbo Diesel
The Ultimate Towing Machine
Pref. Equip. Pkg. 671 A, XLTTrim, speed control/tilt,
A/C, pwr. door locks/windows, Chrome Appearance
pkg., 7.3L power stroke turbo diesel, elect. 4-spd.
auto, trans., 4.10 ratio limited slip axle, dual rear
wheels, floor mats, sliding rear window, spare tire &
wheel, swingout recreation mirror, prem. AM/FM
w/CD, alum, wheels, chrome rear step bumper, pri
vacy glass, remote keyless entry. ATTN: ‘96-97
College Grads. Stk. #65974
$25 j990* Factory Rebate
1J7H 50 “4x4” RAflESDE SUPERCAB
Pref. Equip. Pkg. 507A, XLT series, speed
control/tilt, A/C, 4.6L EFI V8 engine, 5-spd. man.
O/D. trans., P265/70R-17 OWL all-terrain tires, 3.55
ratio limited slip axle, GVWR 6000 lbs., pwr. win
dows & locks, tinted glass, skid plates, sliding rear
window, Trailer Towing Pkg., pwr. aero mirrors, Off-
Road Pkg., 17” alum, wheels, remote keyless
entry/anti-theft, 6-disc CD changer, speed control,
tilt steering wheel, 40/60 split bench seat, 3
yr./36,000 mile warranty. ATTN: ‘96-’97 College
Grads. Stk. #78159
$2,000
of options
at no charge
VARSITY
‘97 EXPLORER “SPORT’
Sport trim, floor mats, radio elec.
prem. w/cass./clock, Luxury Group,
Elec. Group, front overhead con
sole, floor console, fog lamps, P235
OWL all-terrain tires, 4.0 SOHC engine,
auto. O/D trans., 3.73 LS axle/trailer tow, pwr. sun
roof/windows, cloth sport bucket, pwr. door
locks/driver’s seat, rear wiper/washer, solar tinted
glass, 4 wheel disc anti-lock brakes, 3 yr./36,000
mile warranty. ATTN: ‘96-’97 College Grads. Stk.
$1,340
factory options
no charge
$22,390
$25,990
‘96 F350 “STARCRAFT”
CONVERSION CREW CAB
7.5 EFI V8 engine, elec. 4-spd. auto, trans., Inter.
Enhancement/Light Group, AM/FM
stereo/cass./clock, speed control/tilt steering, clear
ance lights, CFC-free A/C, pwr. door locks/windows,
Camper Pkg., tachometer, brt. low-mount swing-
away mirrors, LT215/85RX160 BSW all-season
tires, spare tire & wheel, leather seats, high gloss
wood accents, grab handle, chrome split running
boards, 10” chrome drop bumper, overhead con
sole. ATTN: *96-’97 College Grads. Stk. #4574
$1,600
Factory Rebate
‘97 E150
“W/W0RK BIN RACK SYSTEM”
4.6L EFI V8 engine, elec. auto. O/D trans., bucket
seats, pass, airbag, P235/75RXK BSW all-season
tires, 3.31 ratio regular axle, Heavy Duty Service
Pkg., Handling Pkg., 6700 lbs. GVWR, floor mats,
glass, fixed rear cargo door, work bin rack system,
A/C, elec. AM/FM stereo w/clock, front buckets, tint
ed glass, pwr. steering/front disc brakes. ATTN: ‘96-
’97 College Grads. Stk. #76359
^ . _ ... . E250, E350,
$17 490 V8s, V10*
▼ ■ » A|| jn Sfock
“97 E150 “CHATEAU” CLUB WAGON
XLT trim, del. eng. cover, privacy glass,
speed control, tilt, pwr. mirrors,
elec. AM/FM stereo w/cass.,
Insulation Pkg., A/C, Light Conv.
Group, pass, airbag, 4 wheel anti
lock brakes, Handling Pkg., chrome
bumpers, 7 pass, quad capt. chairs, alum, wheels,
tutone paint, 5.4L EFI V8 engine, elec. 4-spd, auto,
trans., P235/75RX15L OWL all-season, 3.55 ratio
limited slip axle, trl. tow class, A/C, hi-cap, Luxury
Group, remote keyless panic alarm. 3/ yr./36,000
mile warranty. ATTN: ‘96-’97 College Grads. Stk.
#77377
$1,900
Factory Rebate
$22,890’
Special Purchase
Just in time for summer
Save $1000s! Varsity Ford has just purchased alarge
selection for luxury Vans, conversion Pickups from
Starcraft, universal, 7-0-7 at dramatically reduced
prices. These savings we’re passing on to you! High
Tops, Low Tops, V10s, V8s & 6 cyts. Even power stroke
turbo diesels & E150s thru E350s, F150s thru F350s.
FULL
TANK OF GAS WITH
EVERY PURCHASE
ICHIGAN’S “A” PLAN
HEADQUARTERS
SALES OPE MON. &THURS. 9-9
TUES., WED., FRI. 9-6; SAT 9-5
SERVICE NOW OPEN
6 AM - 7 PM MON. thru FRI.
toll free 1-800-875‘FORD


PAGE 40
PAOJE 37: S^retary of State Wilier enjoys smooth sailing m Pmt44umm~Mackmae race ? says Bill Hails*
PAGE 38: Bass ready* for camp, even without Sanders, Westbrook, says Joe Adams*
Lynn
Henning
Joe
Adams
Fisher backers
jump the gun
by staging rally
O n a pure human-relations
basis, there’s not a lot
wrong with Thursday’s “We
Believe in Steve” rally at
the Double Tree Hotel in Novi. It’s a
show of support for a genial head
basketball coach, Steve Fisher, who’s
Journal photo by REBECCA COOK
It took Bubba Trammell a while to get used to being back with the Mud Hens in Toledo.
3 for The Show
Toledo prospects try
to catch Tigers ’ eye
in charge and under some fire at the
University of Michigan.
There will be a lot of dignitaries on
hand, a somewhat curious group that
includes Travis Fryman of the Tigers;
ex-Lions quarterback Gary Daniel
son, now of ESPN; and retired WDIV-
TV news anchor Mort Crim, who is
program emcee.
Everyone presumably will turn out
to pat Fisher on the back. Quite pos
sibly, they’ll urge him to ignore news
paper reports about alleged booster
payoffs and other assorted misdeeds
within the U-M basketball program.
To make this session something
other than a potentially unsettling
testimonial to a coach whose team is
under internal investigation, other
activities are planned. A couple of
important charities - Special Olym
pics and Mott Children’s Hospital in
Ann Arbor - will benefit from a silent
auction that’s also part of the rally.
Among items up for bid is, interest
ingly, a “60 Minutes” script auto
graphed by CBS broadcast journalist
and U-M grad Mike Wallace. His
involvement is a bit surprising,
although a CBS spokesman said Wal
lace signed for charity and was una
ware of a Fisher angle to the event.
Beyond auction items, there will be
a slew of free goodies available
Thursday, ranging from the custom
ary slices of Little Caesars pizza, to
(we are not kidding) 1,000 Steve
Fisher Face Fans.
All in all, an interesting party.
Maybe one that’s being held a bit pre
maturely. Here’s the rub.
See HENNING, Page 38
T OLEDO - When this season
began, Mike Drumright was
in Jacksonville, Bubba Tram
mell was in Detroit and
Frank Catalanatto had just arrived
in Toledo after spending spring train
ing in Oakland’s camp.
Now they are teammates with the
Toledo Mud Hens, the Tigers’ Triple-
A affiliate. Whether they will be
teammates a year from now in
Detroit is anyone’s guess.
They are all just one step away
from the major leagues, but nobody
takes the same path from Ned
Skeldon Stadium to Tiger Stadium.
Mike Drumright
An All-American at Wichita State
and the Tigers’ first pick in the 1995
draft, Drumright, 23, is the most cele
brated of the three and the Tigers
have the highest hopes for him. The
6-foot-4, 210-pound right-hander was
1-1 with a 1.57 ERA in Jacksonville,
See ADAMS, Page 36
That’s because the team announced
on Friday Scotty Bowman will return
as coach - and coach only - on a two-
year contract that will pay him
almost $1 million per season. Holland
will continue as GM. Senior Vice
President Jimmy Devellano will con
tinue in that role, but he won’t be
involved in the day-to-day running of
the hockey operations.
“We’re getting away from the com
mittee. We’ll be running a traditional
setup,” said Holland. “The general
manager will oversee the hockey
club.”
Bowman’s previous contract called
for him to serve the next two years as
player personnel director at $150,000
per season. Assistants Barry Smith
and Dave Lewis will also return.
Mike Krushelnyski won’t.
“As far as I’m concerned, it’s no
change from what I did before
because I never did the deals without
talking to Jimmy and Kenny,”
Bowman said.
As late as the morning after the
Wings’ Stanley Cup victory parade,
Bowman told owner Mike Ilitch that
he was finished coaching and was
going back to Buffalo to fulfill the
last two years of his contract. He had
told Devellano the same thing during
the Stanley Cup Finals. But Bowman
changed his mind and wanted to
return in the same capacity - coach
with player personnel power - he has
served in the last three seasons,
despite Holland’s contract.
Bowman was also well aware of
Holland’s contract. That’s what has
See HARRIS, Page 36
Bowman back
as coach, but
Holland’s GM
N ow we know why Ken
Holland has been acting
more and more like a gen
eral since July 1, the date
when his contract stipulated he
become the Red Wings’ G.M.